folks with hearing aids: do you wear them to bed?

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The past couple of days I had a couple of experiences that made me realize I probably need hearing aids. I have known that I have some hearing loss for quite a while but thought I would hear anything at night and wake up, I do hear things like tree branches scraping on the windows or rats trying to gnaw into the crawlspace vents and wake up immediately... but now I think that's because those happen right outside my bedroom.

Here are the two experiences: One, I was in the bathroom with the door closed, but no extra sounds like running water or fan... thought I heard a soft scratching outside but figured it was a squirrel... bla bla it was the mailman, who said he had both banged on the security door and rung the bell. I hear those sounds fine from my bedroom with the door ajar, but the bathroom is further from the front door and I had the door all the way shut. Two, today I was driving and saw a fire engine coming from the opposite direction, a long block away (what is that, 300-500 ft?), with lights flashing, about the time I completed my thought of "why are the lights flashing but there is no siren?" it had gotten closer and I heard the siren.

So I'm wondering, if there are any folks here who use hearing aids, do you wear them to bed? If not, what's your plan in the event of an intruder?
 
Yes, I am making an appointment.

This being ST&T, I am asking whether others here who wear hearing aids wear them to bed at night, or if not, how they would detect an intrusion.
 
I have profound hearing loss on certain frequencies at 61 yo. I rely on a very alert German Shepherd for notification purposes. She is rarely more than a few feet away.
 
No. Isn't recommended by audiologists either. It'd be like sleeping with something stuck in your ear. The model I have a barely notice when I'm wearing it. Cheap they ain't either. Thing ran about a grand up here.
Like AndyJ says, a dog or even a cat will come get you if somebody breaks in.
If you can't hear well enough to hear a siren at 300 feet, your local Dept. of Transport or whatever Texas calls it can suspend your licence if you don't deal with it.
 
My youngest son wears them and does not wear them to bed under instructions from his audiologist. I'd suggest adding any measures that will alert you to an intruder if you're concerned, such as as a dog as has already been suggested, an alarm or additional locks or latches on doors and windows which will make it more difficult and noisier for someone who's trying to break in.
 
I have no input on the hearing aid subject other than I have some family members that have them and have been told not to sleep with them in. I'm not sure why that is.

As for alert systems, the ONLY thing a high tech alarm system has over a good dog is that in many cases the alarm system can notify local authorities the moment something happens.

But even then you're relying on response times, which can vary quite a bit. As far as being able to be alerted in order to defend yourself, a good dog is just fine. Best option is an alarm system and a dog IMHO.

Alarm systems can fail, a good dog won't.
 
To bed no. They spend the night in a moisture absorbing container to dry them out
 
If you can't hear well enough to hear a siren at 300 feet, your local Dept. of Transport or whatever Texas calls it can suspend your licence if you don't deal with it.
I wouldn't read too much into her "not hearing" the siren, since they don't always sound the siren continuously. They will often sound it only as needed.
 
Sunray said:
If you can't hear well enough to hear a siren at 300 feet, your local Dept. of Transport or whatever Texas calls it can suspend your licence if you don't deal with it.

TXDOT does not administer driver licensing, TXDPS (Texas Department of Public Safety) does. They test your eyes not your ears. Deafness is not a disqualifier to licensing in the state. The state will issue you a decal to put on your car to notify LE that you are hearing impaired as they approach during a traffic stop.

We just had a cold front come through that dropped the temps from the low 100s/high 90s into the mid 80s. Even with good ears, widows up, and AC on I'll bet you would be hard pressed to hear a siren.
 
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I wear hearing aids. I do not wear them to bed. The feedback into your ear from the pillow would be horrible.
I have a dog for the alerting. I have seen some cool tech WRT vibration mode devices touching the bed to wake you as an alarm clock does. No reason this couldn't be used as an intrusion alarm.
 
Thanks everybody. :)

I have security doors and very good window latches, and the windows are never opened. Two sides of the house are lighted dawn to dusk, the other two sides have motion detector lights. Someone would have to ignore the possibility of being seen and break a window to get in, but after my recent experiences I'm no longer certain whether I would hear the breaking glass if it was a window at the opposite end of the house and I were asleep at the time. I had an idea for a low-tech alarm system of strings of jingle bells on every window, but I guess that's now also out.

Have thought about a dog from time to time, one big problem with that is that for some reason fleas totally love me and I'm very sensitive to the venom. If anybody has a foolproof method to keep a dog and the house free of fleas, I'm all ears. :)

In my mind there are three types of people who break into houses:
1. professionals - they are not going to target my modest house when there are huge expensive homes only a block away.
2. what I call "rational" criminals, who just want a quick way to get money for drugs or whatever - these are lazy and would probably decide to look for an easier house rather than chance being seen breaking a window.
3. crazies - there are quite a few of these around here and they are totally unpredictable, this is the group that I worry about.
 
If hearing broken glass is a concern, there are alarm systems with glass break or motion detectors. I installed a Simplisafe system a while ago and has been happy with it. Both of these features are available through them.
 
If hearing broken glass is a concern, there are alarm systems with glass break or motion detectors. I installed a Simplisafe system a while ago and has been happy with it. Both of these features are available through them.
That looks quite attractive, thanks a lot for the tip. :)

Do you have the glass-break sensors in your house?
 
Hello! I was born profoundly deaf (on the edge of legal deafness)and have worn hearing aids since the age of 3. ( I am 46 now) Trying to wear to bed will also result in constant feedback manifesting itself as a sharp whistling. Plus it can cause some damage. I have to wear the more powerful behind the ear models so that is more susceptible to that.

As for alarms, you can obtain alarm clock, phone, and door bell rings via a visible flashing light, in addition to a bed shaker mode for alarm clocks.

With my hearing aids I can hear relatively normal, serving 15 years as a paramedic and 8 as police. I pretty much guarantee sirens didn't help either....:eek:
 
Hello! I was born profoundly deaf (on the edge of legal deafness)and have worn hearing aids since the age of 3. ( I am 46 now) Trying to wear to bed will also result in constant feedback manifesting itself as a sharp whistling. Plus it can cause some damage. I have to wear the more powerful behind the ear models so that is more susceptible to that.

As for alarms, you can obtain alarm clock, phone, and door bell rings via a visible flashing light, in addition to a bed shaker mode for alarm clocks.

With my hearing aids I can hear relatively normal, serving 15 years as a paramedic and 8 as police. I pretty much guarantee sirens didn't help either....:eek:
Thanks for sharing. :)

I can thankfully hear OK close up. If G-d forbid somebody broke a window in my bedroom while I were asleep there, I would hear it and wake up. But I'm no longer confident I would hear a breaking window at the opposite end of the house.

Being that I recently changed to a wireless doorbell (the wired one stopped working and handyman was unable to fix it), moving the part that makes noise (the "receiver") was just a matter of picking it up from where it was and moving it elsewhere. So it's now centrally located in the house. But from the room where I normally sit it now sounds like some kind of chime from my cellphone, as opposed to the doorbell it used to sound like when it was in the same room as me.

Last year it happened to me twice that I didn't hear someone who came up behind me outdoors -- once on the street where it turned out to be a friend out walking at the same time as me, the other time in a parking lot where the person wanted to know if he could take my empty shopping cart given that there weren't any in front of the store. I wrote both experiences off as having been preoccupied and not doing a good enough job of situational awareness but now in retrospect I realize I probably actually didn't hear them. Very grateful both situations were harmless.
 
Hello! I was born profoundly deaf (on the edge of legal deafness)and have worn hearing aids since the age of 3. ( I am 46 now) Trying to wear to bed will also result in constant feedback manifesting itself as a sharp whistling. Plus it can cause some damage. I have to wear the more powerful behind the ear models so that is more susceptible to that.

As for alarms, you can obtain alarm clock, phone, and door bell rings via a visible flashing light, in addition to a bed shaker mode for alarm clocks.

With my hearing aids I can hear relatively normal, serving 15 years as a paramedic and 8 as police. I pretty much guarantee sirens didn't help either....:eek:
So since you are a LEO I assume you go shooting at a range in order to train and practice. Do you wear your hearing aids when you are there? With regular ear pro as well? Or how do you handle it?
 
In cooler weather shooting pistols I leave them on under electronic muffs. Makes it very convenient while talking.

With rifles or hot weather where sweating can damage them over time I just remove them and use plugs and muffs turned off.
 
In cooler weather shooting pistols I leave them on under electronic muffs. Makes it very convenient while talking.

With rifles or hot weather where sweating can damage them over time I just remove them and use plugs and muffs turned off.
Why do you turn the muffs off when you don't have the hearing aids on? I can at least hear that somebody's talking to me with the muffs turned on, although last time I couldn't understand what they were saying.
 
I am on or past the line of legally deaf in volume. With my hearing aids out I can only hear the loudest sounds faintly. I do have bass hearing but high pitch loss, or rather never had it. Thunder if close, banging on wall next to me, ETC......

I turn the muffs off to save the batteries, and even if on I could not hear any conversation. Think a faint underwater sound is close to what I hear without them.

Due to this deafness I can and have sleep thru a tornado, thunderboomer storms, and loud outdoor activities.

Without my hearing aids in to block the direct sound pressure waves I am very sensitive to loud noise such as gunshots. I can be around outdoor shooting of 9mm pistols without muffs but with the hearing aids on and can tolerate it, it does get hurtful after a bit.
 
I am on or past the line of legally deaf in volume. With my hearing aids out I can only hear the loudest sounds faintly. I do have bass hearing but high pitch loss, or rather never had it. Thunder if close, banging on wall next to me, ETC......

I turn the muffs off to save the batteries, and even if on I could not hear any conversation. Think a faint underwater sound is close to what I hear without them.

Due to this deafness I can and have sleep thru a tornado, thunderboomer storms, and loud outdoor activities.

Without my hearing aids in to block the direct sound pressure waves I am very sensitive to loud noise such as gunshots. I can be around outdoor shooting of 9mm pistols without muffs but with the hearing aids on and can tolerate it, it does get hurtful after a bit.
Oh, so the answer really depends on the degree of hearing loss. OK, I get it now.

Thanks very much for your time and energy answering my questions. :)
 
I'm on my 4th set of aids, VA gives me the latest every 4 to 5 years. Do I wear them to bed, never, they into the case.

In my case my wife could hear a mouse walk across the hardwood floor.
 
My father has hearing aids and he does not wear them to bed.
Come to think of it he doesn't wear them half the time when he's up, so I'm not sure how helpful that is. :)
 
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