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Gyroscopic stabilization.. hehe

Discussion in 'Handguns: General Discussion' started by powderific, Dec 26, 2002.

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  1. powderific

    powderific Member

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    Anyone here know of any occasions where someone used a gyroscope to stabalize a handgun for offhand shooting? I have always kindof wondered how it would work :D I know you can get gyroscope attachements to stick in the tripod mount of a camera, so why don't they make em to mount on those little flashlight/ accesory rails? It seems like something EVERYONE could use, how can you possibly be tactical without a gyroscopically stabilized pistol?



    :p
     
  2. 45R

    45R Member

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    I believe the new model Terminator in T3 may have such hands.
     
  3. C.R.Sam

    C.R.Sam Moderator Emeritus

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    How appropriate for Canon to come up with a stabalized handgun.
    Big bore of course.

    Quite doable.
    Recoil might make it precess violently to some unwanted direction.
    Not a good idea for a weapon tho.
    A gyro out of whack is not a pretty sight.

    Sam
     
  4. dd-b

    dd-b Member

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    Something like the Steadicam should work fine for shooting (but note that an actual Steadicam doesn't use gyroscopes or any other active technology; it's a wonder of balance and mechanical engineering instead).

    And you need video assist; the gun version of that would be a video camera mounted as a site, with display at a convenient place for the operator to watch it. (The geometry of the thing doesn't bring the viewfinder of the camera anywhere near your eye).

    Of course, the small-scale semi-pro steadicams for light cameras cost around $5k.

    I've applied things I learned in low-light photography to shooting, and vice versa. I've croggled some photographers (though not Oleg or Randy) by pointing this out on occasion. They both have the same problem -- holding something very still pointed in a precise direction.
     
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