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H&R Revolver help, how do I open it up?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by Peter M. Eick, Feb 19, 2009.

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  1. Peter M. Eick

    Peter M. Eick Member

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    Short story is my father in law has had to move to a home and my mother in law found an H&R model 822 revolver in the house. She showed it to me on the video phone and it is definitely an H&R style of revolver. Looks like a double action but I could not see how to open it up and even figure out if it is empty.

    How do I explain over the video phone to her to even open it up and make it safe?

    Pictures or explicit instructions would help a bunch.

    By the way, she says it is an 822 model but I think it may be a 622 model. My guess is it was bought in the 60's and looks in nice shape.
     
  2. buckeye8

    buckeye8 Member

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    There should be a little button on the left side of the frame just in front of the cylinder. Push the button, and while holding that button, pull the cylinder pin straight out of the cylinder. The cylinder will fall freely once the pin is fully removed.

    Note: I do not have experience with this exact model, but I think all the 600 series H&R's work this way.
     
  3. goodtime

    goodtime Member

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    If it's a more modern double action, the pin just below the barrel that goes through the center of the cylinder will pull forward (in the direction of fire,) and then the cylinder will swing out to the left just like any other revolver. If it's older, buckeye8 said it.
     
  4. Haywood

    Haywood Member

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    The 622 cylinder comes out all the way it dose not swing out. Just pull on the center pin.
     
  5. Peter M. Eick

    Peter M. Eick Member

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    I did not see any buttons on the side of the frame anywhere on the video camera. I will ask her tomorrow to just pull the pin out completely and see what happens.

    Thanks a bunch.
     
  6. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    I don't find a model 822, but there is a model 832. It has a crane/yoke - and the cylinder swings out to the left. To release it, pull the ejector rod forward.

    There is a model 622. It has a solid frame, and you remove the cylinder to eject the fired rounds. To remove the cylinder, look at the front/left side of the frame where you would expect the yoke to be (but it isn't). There is a button, somewhat like the cylinder latch on a Colt Single Action Army. Push it inward and hold it while pulling the cylinder pin forward and out. Thereafter the cylinder can be picked out of the frame. Reassemble in reverse order.

    If you can determine the exact model, and or what cartridge it is chambered for, I will try to pin it down. It might help to know the approximate barrel length and butt style (round, square,or western style).

    To add: Apparently there are 1960's era model 622 revolvers that don't have the button latch. In place of it is a simple spring and ball that fits into a groove in the cylinder pin. To remove it, simply give the pin a hard pull forward and it will come out. Thereafter the cylinder will fall out. Reassemble in reverse order. Might be a good idea to do this over a bed or stuffed chair.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2009
  7. Sauer Grapes

    Sauer Grapes Member

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    I am looking at mine right now. No buttons or such, just pull pin under barrel.
    22 cal.
     
  8. Sauer Grapes

    Sauer Grapes Member

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    I am looking at mine right now. No buttons or such, just pull pin under barrel.
    22 cal.Model 622
     
  9. woad_yurt

    woad_yurt Member

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    First, put the gun on safety cock. It's a 1/2 cock, sort of, about 1/8" up from full rest. There should be a tab under the cylinder pin on the front of the frame below the barrel. Push it in (towards the rear of the gun) and pull the pin forward and out. Make sure you catch the cylinder or it'll fall out and get dinged.

    It's a lot easier to put back in when in the safe cock mode as the slightly raised hammer doesn't interfere with the cylinder's rotating. The safe cock is how it should be carried. Or, the hammer can fully rest in between rounds. Is yours a really old one? What's the serial number letter prefix? Does yours have a star ejector in there?
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2009
  10. XD9WBT

    XD9WBT member

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    Have her call a cop and have him do it.
     
  11. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    Not unless it's an older one. Since police departments switched to autoloaders there is little or no training regarding revolvers, and the little there is, is about hand ejectors. I know of instances where a patrolman (or woman) had to call a supervisor to help them unload a cylinder-gun.
     
  12. Duke of Doubt

    Duke of Doubt member

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    Very true, Fuff. Years ago, a police officer was mystified by several pistols I had. These were not exotic guns. You may assume the officer is trained and qualified on his own duty wepaon, but most of a patrolman's duties do not revolve around firearms identification and operation, so he is no more likely than Joe Citizen to know anything about it or how safely to clear it, unless he is a fifty-something.
     
  13. TehK1w1

    TehK1w1 Member

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    I recall an episode of "cops" where the perp had a gun with a euro-style mag release (I think it was a Makarov, but I don't remember) and the cop had to ask the guy how to remove the magazine.
    Just because they use firearms as a tool does not mean they necessarily know much about guns they do not use.
     
  14. Peter M. Eick

    Peter M. Eick Member

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    My issue is I need to get it open so my wife can bring it back on the plane. Obviously we need to check it in baggage and to do so you have to open it up and prove it safe to check it (or at least that is what I had to do). Thus I have to get it open "remotely" because I am not going up there.

    Since on the video I could not see any buttons or cut outs on the frame like an crane cutout, I presume that this all comes apart by pulling the cylinder pin.

    I will have to get her on the video phone again and try again.

    Thanks for the advice.
     
  15. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    Once you get the cylinder out I suggest that you put it in checked bagage, and the rest of the revolver in a second case (package or whatever). A revolver without a cylinder should make the folks at airport security very happy. :)
     
  16. XD9WBT

    XD9WBT member

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    Well it doesn't really matter which cop does it just so it gets done. I mean isn't that the main idea. Wouldn't it be much smarter to get someone with a little knowledge to try and do it instead of a woman with no knowledge and some written instructions.

    Sure seems like a better idea to me.
     
  17. RBGreen

    RBGreen Member

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    H &r 732

    Hi,

    My father has an H & R 732 that is around 30 years old that has never been fired. He forgets how to open it up. I tried pretty hard to pull the pin forward and it won't budge. I oiled it overnight and still no luck. All the parts move fine and it does not appear to be rusted at all.

    Any ideas how I get this thing open?

    Thanks
     
  18. James T Thomas

    James T Thomas Member

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    Another model to consider

    If the model number is an error:

    My model 999 is a "top break" revolver.
    This model can be determined by a large pin through the frame that the "action" rotates out of engagement upon.

    While holding the grip in your shooting hand; and taking care not to rest your finger on the trigger, and pointing the weapon in a safe direction, grasp the rear sight between your thumb and index finger and pull upward.

    If there is interference in breaking the pistol open and once you manage to do so; after removing the cylinder...

    Now that the gun is broken open:
    To disassemble the cylinder simply place a hard object against the "bobby pin" appearing metal tab, on the frame, in front of the cylinder and press inward. While maintaining pressure on this piece, simply withdraw the cylinder off of the post.
    -Then you can also remedy the interference problem by tightening the ejector rod. Twist it or run it down until it is fully seated. It is the rod that lifts the extractor "star".
     
  19. RBGreen

    RBGreen Member

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    Not a mistake on model. It is a 732. One piece frame and the cylinder should swing out to the left. Just can't budge it.
     
  20. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    Welcome to The High Road, although the circumstances are less then happy.

    There is indeed an H&R Model 732. To open the cylinder, pull the ejector rod forward about an eighth of an inch, and then swing the cylinder out to the left.

    If the rod doesn't want to move, point the muzzle up and then squirt some penetrating oil on the rod and the front of the crane so that the oil can run down into it. Excessive oil can be wiped off later.

    If the rod still won’t move, remove the stocks, place the revolver in a shallow pan, and submerge it in a bath of oil. I recommend Marvel Mystery Oil, which is an inexpensive automotive product sold in many if not most auto accessory stores, including Wal-Mart. After a few hours, remove the gun from the bath, and wipe off the oil – including the bore and chambers. If you have access to an air hose blow out as much oil as you can. Repeat the above as necessary until the ejector rod decides to move. Pour the remaining oil back into the original container, as it can be used over and over.

    And if you’re not working on guns you can pour it into your gas tank. :what:

    Really you can, read the instructions on the container. :D
     
  21. RBGreen

    RBGreen Member

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    Thank you

    Old Fuff,

    Thank you. I tried some regular oil, now I am on to the penetrating oil. I am sure I will get it open I just wanted to confirm my suspiscion that something was not right here. Should not be that big of a deal.
     
  22. Peter M. Eick

    Peter M. Eick Member

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    By the way, my wife opened it up the first time from the instructions. It was empty and she will bring it back when she drives up there this summer. No point in checking bags on the flight home and the hassle since she is driving.
     
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