Quantcast

Holding a flashlight

Discussion in 'Strategies, Tactics and Training' started by UKTN, Aug 23, 2006.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. black bear

    black bear Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2004
    Messages:
    417
    Location:
    Long Island N. Y.
    I use Pachmeyr PAC SKIN in some of my flashlights, it improves the grip and is a great insulator from the cold in lights that are left in the trunk of the car.

    Here is a picture of the new version and the old sleeve.

    S5300069.jpg

    The new version is Neoprene with a self stick surface.

    black bear
     
  2. Falconeer

    Falconeer Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2005
    Messages:
    577
    Location:
    Pagosa Springs, CO
    I took a tactical handgun training class a couple of months back and flashlight technique was covered. There are a couple of problems with the 'hold the flashlight away' method:

    1) It's providing no support to your strong hand, and in fact probably weakens it due to sympathetic muscle contraction
    2) Most shooters (especially untrained) miss to the low left. You're more likely to be 'hit by a miss' if they're shooting at an extended to the left light.

    My $.02, YMMV.
     
  3. george_co

    george_co Member

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2003
    Messages:
    133
    My question regarding techniques which have the GG squarely facing the BG is: are these techniques based on the assumption that the GG is going to have a bullet resistent vest on (LEO), and that they are safer if they have the vest squarely towards the threat? With the light directing the attention (and aim) directly at the protected area? Whereas, most of us home defenders only have the hair on our chest to deflect bullets, and most of us aren't superman.
     
  4. kbarrett

    kbarrett Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    97
    Location:
    Southwest WA
    Hmmm .... during a home invasion, the butler should awaken me, and tell me:

    "Burglar for you sar....",

    and then hand me my burglar pistol, and release the hounds.

    He should then stand about 20 feet away from me and illuminate the burglar with something resembling an aircraft landing light with two 12 volt lead-acid cells slung under it.
     
  5. MBane666

    MBane666 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2004
    Messages:
    244
    STRONGLY recommend Firearms Academy of Seattle lowlight class and/or SUREFIRE class!

    I've been lucky enough to take both, and what I learned is thatflashlight techniques are situational. I worked with Bill Rogers back in the early days and learned my low light techniques directly from him. Marty's class and subsequent SUREFIRE classes with Bill Murphy have really expaned my knowledge base.

    Alternately, watch SHOOTING GALLERY...I try to do a low light class every season.

    Michael b
     
  6. DMK

    DMK Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    8,816
    Location:
    Over the hills and far, far away
    I'm not willing to bet my life on that gamble.
     
  7. DMK

    DMK Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    8,816
    Location:
    Over the hills and far, far away
    LOL! Get your butler a weapon. Then he can add "Would you like for me to dispatch him for you sir?" and you can get back to your beauty sleep. :p
     
  8. RobMoore

    RobMoore Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2007
    Messages:
    721
    Location:
    Eastern Shore MD
    With respect to the three main techniques I've seen used and taught, I would think the one that lets you see your adversary and put multiple rounds into him as quickly as possible is the best one. For me, thats "back of the hands together".
     
  9. BOONER

    BOONER Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2006
    Messages:
    324
    only answer is for you to get out and train/
    HANDHELD FLASHLIGHT TECHNIQUES

    A hard look at the various techniques for employing a flashlight with a handgun.
    By Ken J. Good
    Photos by Ichiro Nagata
    Most law enforcement shootings occur during the hours from sunset to sunrise when ambient light is either greatly reduced from normal daytime levels - even when artificial lighting is available - or is virtually nonexistent. Low-light shootings undoubtedly comprise the majority of citizen shootings, such as a shop keeper thwarting an armed robbery or a home owner defeating an intruder. There is an obvious reason for this similarity between police and civilian gunplay - criminals are more active after sundown.

    Because most shootings occur in low-light conditions, it is not only desirable for police and civilians to become proficient at shooting with the aid of flashlights, it's absolutely crucial. Being skilled and comfortable at operating a firearm and a flashlight simultaneously empowers you with two significant tactical advantages. First, you are more effective in any gross motor activity if you have subconsciously ingrained the skills. You are unlikely to become distracted by equipment issues if you have thoroughly learned a technique. Just like having your gun handling skills hard-wired into your subconscious through repetition and practice, so too is it important to ingrain flashlight techniques into your reflexive skill-set. Second, by learning flashlight techniques as part of your gun handling skills, you are able to maintain the proper mindset - confident, controlling, dominating any actual or potential threat.

    The first flashlight-and-gun techniques were designed around "regular" flashlights with designs that had remained basically unchanged for half a century. Such lights had thin metal or plastic bodies, held a couple of alkaline C- or D-cells, and used a comparatively weak bulb. Flashlights for law enforcement and outdoor use were gradually improved, becoming more rugged, reliable and technologically sophisticated. Long, heavy flashlights like the Kel-Light and the Mag-Lite became synonymous with "police flashlight" because, in addition to being comparatively bright, they could also be used as a baton or restraint device. Their common use by police encouraged the development of several flashlight-and-gun techniques. Flashlight design continued to evolve. Bulb and battery technology, together with ergonomic considerations, resulted first in more powerful beams from "regular" lights, like those sold by Streamlight in the early '70s, and finally into seriously bright and dazzling beams from quite small flashlights like those sold first under the SureFire brand by Laser Products in the mid-'80s.

    Smaller And Brighter
    The advent of small, powerful handheld lights, whose bodies are an inch or less in diameter, are now universally accepted by police officers, specialized military units, executive protection professionals and outdoorsmen. Although many shooting techniques that were developed for large flashlights worked equally well with the new, small flashlights, some did not, resulting in modifications of the original techniques or the creation of new techniques.The best known of the techniques that were initially developed for use with large-bodied flashlights is the Harries Technique, named for its developer, Michael Harries. The Chapman Technique is another well-known model, developed by longtime trainer and former IPSC champion Ray Chapman.The most popular of the new techniques developed for small lights is the Rogers/SureFire Method. A well-trained shooter should be at least familiar with all of these techniques. Depending on circumstances, each can have its place.

    The best way to grasp the positive and negative attributes of each technique is to try each at night or in dark conditions with both large and small flashlights, while shooting live ammunition. Keep in mind that while a static test of the technique without live-firing is certainly useful, the true value and applicability of each technique cannot be completely understood and evaluated until it is used under conditions closely approximating actual search, house clearing, SWAT, or combat conditions. Under such conditions, stress, fatigue, corners, obstacles and flashlight features will all have a significant effect.

    All Hands
    Essentially, you can divide all flashlight techniques into either "hands-together" or "hands-apart" methods. In a hands-together technique, the gun-hand and the light-hand are touching or are pressed together. An excellent example is the Harries Technique, probably the most widely taught flashlight technique. The idea behind the various hands-together techniques is to allow the operator to duplicate a proper two-handed firing grip, even while holding a large, bulky, round object. The primary advantage of a hands-together technique is to stabilize the shooting platform with scant regard to any tactical considerations such as ease of shooting around cover or transition of the weapon from hand to hand. Conversely, the hands-apart methods, in which the gun-hand and the light-hand move independently without contact, were designed primarily to maximize tactical considerations. The argument that a hands-apart technique sacrifices a two-hand firing grip is certainly well founded, however, the various hands-together techniques are, if you try them on the range and not in your living room, not nearly as solid as you might suspect. Recoil from even a 9mm, let alone a .45, tends to pull the isometric tension apart after a few rounds.

    And so while it is true that a hands-apart technique limits the shooter to firing strong- or weak-hand-only, in a CQB environment where firefights erupt suddenly and unexpectedly at close range, the ability to move quickly and fire from cover or around corners more than outweighs the disadvantage of shooting one-handed. Truthfully, the well-rounded shooter practices all of the techniques and uses whatever is best for a given set of circumstances. There is no "best" flashlight technique for a shooter any more than there is a "best" tool for a mechanic.

    Tactical Considerations
    When a flashlight is activated in a low-light situation, there is an almost irresistible urge- intensified under stressful conditions- to move the brightest part of the beam so that it shines on the point of danger or into a potential assailant's face. But in any of the hands-together techniques, the user's hands are locked or pressed together so that redirecting the beam also redirects the barrel of the gun. At a few yards distance, even a moderate adjustment of the flashlight beam can turn a perfect center-mass aim into a complete miss. Taking your eyes off the assailant to realign the gun is dangerous, and may well move the flashlight's central bright spot off the target again, starting the process over. Thus, it is imperative to be aware of this phenomenon and train accordingly.

    There are two ways to simplify your training to prevent such a problem. When directing your hands-together flashlight and gun toward a potential target, or when sweeping them during a search, remember that the gun hand is the master hand. It's the driver, and the flashlight hand is merely "along for the ride," so to speak. Secondly, adopt the mentality that when the flashlight is activated, what you see is what you get. That is, be prepared to shoot with whatever part of the beam happens to be on the target. Don't get in the habit of trying to achieve a perfect "spotlight" view of the target every time you switch on the light. Instead, pay attention to where your gun is aimed. In a situation where a split-second could mean the difference between life and death, gun alignment matters most.

    Ken J. Good is the founding director of the SureFire Institute. Currently offering authorized SureFire Institute classes through Strategos International, Ken can be reached at 888-LOW-LIGHT or www.strategosinternational.com



    Harries Technique
    This technique is named after the late Michael Harries, a pioneer of modern practical combat shooting. The most popular of the hands-together techniques, the Harries was developed in the early '70s for use with large-bodied "police flashlights." The Harries Technique was embraced by Col. Jeff Cooper and became the predominant technique taught at Cooper's famed shooting school, Gunsite. It is widely used today and is well-suited to small flashlights. To employ the Harries Technique, the flashlight is held in an ice pick grip with the reflector, or lens, on the side opposite the thumb. The thumb or finger operates the on/off switch, whether it is a tactical tailcap like on a SureFire CombatLight or a body-mounted button. The shooter's wrists nest together and the backs of the hands are firmly pressed together to create stabilizing isometric tension. For large flashlights, the body of the flashlight may be rested on the shooting hand's forearm.







    Pros

    Works well with small or large flashlights.
    Aligns the flashlight beam automatically with the weapon's muzzle.
    Enables a steadier, two-handed support of the handgun prior to shooting.
    Less fatiguing with large-bodied flashlight that can be rested on the shooting hand's forearm, enabling extended use.
    Conforms well to the "low ready" position as taught at Gunsite.
    Excellent ergonomics for use with the Weaver stance.
    Cons

    Displacement of the beam from the muzzle during discharge of the weapon.
    Proximity of hands increases the chance of a sympathetic contraction - resulting in an accidental discharge- and greater likelihood of "hand confusion."
    Muzzle can sweep the flashlight hand or forearm during a hasty employment.
    Leads to self-blinding when a right-handed shooter attempts to navigate a corner or wall on his right side. This not only reduces the shooter's vision substantially but also silhouettes the shooter and other team members to all threats in the area.
    Light is located at the shooter's center of mass.
    Poor ergonomics for anything but the Weaver stance.
     
  10. BOONER

    BOONER Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2006
    Messages:
    324
    only answer is for you to get out and train/
    HANDHELD FLASHLIGHT TECHNIQUES

    A hard look at the various techniques for employing a flashlight with a handgun.
    By Ken J. Good
    Photos by Ichiro Nagata
    Most law enforcement shootings occur during the hours from sunset to sunrise when ambient light is either greatly reduced from normal daytime levels - even when artificial lighting is available - or is virtually nonexistent. Low-light shootings undoubtedly comprise the majority of citizen shootings, such as a shop keeper thwarting an armed robbery or a home owner defeating an intruder. There is an obvious reason for this similarity between police and civilian gunplay - criminals are more active after sundown.

    Because most shootings occur in low-light conditions, it is not only desirable for police and civilians to become proficient at shooting with the aid of flashlights, it's absolutely crucial. Being skilled and comfortable at operating a firearm and a flashlight simultaneously empowers you with two significant tactical advantages. First, you are more effective in any gross motor activity if you have subconsciously ingrained the skills. You are unlikely to become distracted by equipment issues if you have thoroughly learned a technique. Just like having your gun handling skills hard-wired into your subconscious through repetition and practice, so too is it important to ingrain flashlight techniques into your reflexive skill-set. Second, by learning flashlight techniques as part of your gun handling skills, you are able to maintain the proper mindset - confident, controlling, dominating any actual or potential threat.

    The first flashlight-and-gun techniques were designed around "regular" flashlights with designs that had remained basically unchanged for half a century. Such lights had thin metal or plastic bodies, held a couple of alkaline C- or D-cells, and used a comparatively weak bulb. Flashlights for law enforcement and outdoor use were gradually improved, becoming more rugged, reliable and technologically sophisticated. Long, heavy flashlights like the Kel-Light and the Mag-Lite became synonymous with "police flashlight" because, in addition to being comparatively bright, they could also be used as a baton or restraint device. Their common use by police encouraged the development of several flashlight-and-gun techniques. Flashlight design continued to evolve. Bulb and battery technology, together with ergonomic considerations, resulted first in more powerful beams from "regular" lights, like those sold by Streamlight in the early '70s, and finally into seriously bright and dazzling beams from quite small flashlights like those sold first under the SureFire brand by Laser Products in the mid-'80s.

    Smaller And Brighter
    The advent of small, powerful handheld lights, whose bodies are an inch or less in diameter, are now universally accepted by police officers, specialized military units, executive protection professionals and outdoorsmen. Although many shooting techniques that were developed for large flashlights worked equally well with the new, small flashlights, some did not, resulting in modifications of the original techniques or the creation of new techniques.The best known of the techniques that were initially developed for use with large-bodied flashlights is the Harries Technique, named for its developer, Michael Harries. The Chapman Technique is another well-known model, developed by longtime trainer and former IPSC champion Ray Chapman.The most popular of the new techniques developed for small lights is the Rogers/SureFire Method. A well-trained shooter should be at least familiar with all of these techniques. Depending on circumstances, each can have its place.

    The best way to grasp the positive and negative attributes of each technique is to try each at night or in dark conditions with both large and small flashlights, while shooting live ammunition. Keep in mind that while a static test of the technique without live-firing is certainly useful, the true value and applicability of each technique cannot be completely understood and evaluated until it is used under conditions closely approximating actual search, house clearing, SWAT, or combat conditions. Under such conditions, stress, fatigue, corners, obstacles and flashlight features will all have a significant effect.

    All Hands
    Essentially, you can divide all flashlight techniques into either "hands-together" or "hands-apart" methods. In a hands-together technique, the gun-hand and the light-hand are touching or are pressed together. An excellent example is the Harries Technique, probably the most widely taught flashlight technique. The idea behind the various hands-together techniques is to allow the operator to duplicate a proper two-handed firing grip, even while holding a large, bulky, round object. The primary advantage of a hands-together technique is to stabilize the shooting platform with scant regard to any tactical considerations such as ease of shooting around cover or transition of the weapon from hand to hand. Conversely, the hands-apart methods, in which the gun-hand and the light-hand move independently without contact, were designed primarily to maximize tactical considerations. The argument that a hands-apart technique sacrifices a two-hand firing grip is certainly well founded, however, the various hands-together techniques are, if you try them on the range and not in your living room, not nearly as solid as you might suspect. Recoil from even a 9mm, let alone a .45, tends to pull the isometric tension apart after a few rounds.

    And so while it is true that a hands-apart technique limits the shooter to firing strong- or weak-hand-only, in a CQB environment where firefights erupt suddenly and unexpectedly at close range, the ability to move quickly and fire from cover or around corners more than outweighs the disadvantage of shooting one-handed. Truthfully, the well-rounded shooter practices all of the techniques and uses whatever is best for a given set of circumstances. There is no "best" flashlight technique for a shooter any more than there is a "best" tool for a mechanic.

    Tactical Considerations
    When a flashlight is activated in a low-light situation, there is an almost irresistible urge- intensified under stressful conditions- to move the brightest part of the beam so that it shines on the point of danger or into a potential assailant's face. But in any of the hands-together techniques, the user's hands are locked or pressed together so that redirecting the beam also redirects the barrel of the gun. At a few yards distance, even a moderate adjustment of the flashlight beam can turn a perfect center-mass aim into a complete miss. Taking your eyes off the assailant to realign the gun is dangerous, and may well move the flashlight's central bright spot off the target again, starting the process over. Thus, it is imperative to be aware of this phenomenon and train accordingly.

    There are two ways to simplify your training to prevent such a problem. When directing your hands-together flashlight and gun toward a potential target, or when sweeping them during a search, remember that the gun hand is the master hand. It's the driver, and the flashlight hand is merely "along for the ride," so to speak. Secondly, adopt the mentality that when the flashlight is activated, what you see is what you get. That is, be prepared to shoot with whatever part of the beam happens to be on the target. Don't get in the habit of trying to achieve a perfect "spotlight" view of the target every time you switch on the light. Instead, pay attention to where your gun is aimed. In a situation where a split-second could mean the difference between life and death, gun alignment matters most.

    Ken J. Good is the founding director of the SureFire Institute. Currently offering authorized SureFire Institute classes through Strategos International, Ken can be reached at 888-LOW-LIGHT or www.strategosinternational.com



    Harries Technique
    This technique is named after the late Michael Harries, a pioneer of modern practical combat shooting. The most popular of the hands-together techniques, the Harries was developed in the early '70s for use with large-bodied "police flashlights." The Harries Technique was embraced by Col. Jeff Cooper and became the predominant technique taught at Cooper's famed shooting school, Gunsite. It is widely used today and is well-suited to small flashlights. To employ the Harries Technique, the flashlight is held in an ice pick grip with the reflector, or lens, on the side opposite the thumb. The thumb or finger operates the on/off switch, whether it is a tactical tailcap like on a SureFire CombatLight or a body-mounted button. The shooter's wrists nest together and the backs of the hands are firmly pressed together to create stabilizing isometric tension. For large flashlights, the body of the flashlight may be rested on the shooting hand's forearm.







    Pros

    Works well with small or large flashlights.
    Aligns the flashlight beam automatically with the weapon's muzzle.
    Enables a steadier, two-handed support of the handgun prior to shooting.
    Less fatiguing with large-bodied flashlight that can be rested on the shooting hand's forearm, enabling extended use.
    Conforms well to the "low ready" position as taught at Gunsite.
    Excellent ergonomics for use with the Weaver stance.
    Cons

    Displacement of the beam from the muzzle during discharge of the weapon.
    Proximity of hands increases the chance of a sympathetic contraction - resulting in an accidental discharge- and greater likelihood of "hand confusion."
    Muzzle can sweep the flashlight hand or forearm during a hasty employment.
    Leads to self-blinding when a right-handed shooter attempts to navigate a corner or wall on his right side. This not only reduces the shooter's vision substantially but also silhouettes the shooter and other team members to all threats in the area.
    Light is located at the shooter's center of mass.
    Poor ergonomics for anything but the Weaver stance.
     
  11. BOONER

    BOONER Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2006
    Messages:
    324
    part 2

    Marine Corps Technique


    The development of this technique is attributed to U.S. Marine Corps embassy guards. A hands-together technique, it is executed by grasping the flashlight in a sword grip with the thumb or finger on a body-mounted on/off switch. The rim of the flashlight lens is pressed forward against the tips of the firing hand's gripping fingers, even locking the fingers in place if the rim of the flashlight's bezel is deep enough, creating a stabilizing tension.







    Pros

    Surprisingly comfortable and stable, even with large flashlights.
    Keeps the flashlight beam well aligned with the gun barrel.
    Enables steadier, two-hand support of the weapon prior to shooting.

    Cons

    Limited only to side-switch flashlights with fairly large lenses.
    Displaces the beam from the weapon's alignment during firing.
    Proximity of the hands increases the chance of a sympathetic contraction of the gun hand when the side-switch is pressed, and can cause "hand confusion."
    Misalignment of the flashlight beam with the target can alter the alignment of the weapon with target, and vice versa.
    Light is located at the shooter's center of mass.




    Chapman Technique
    Named for Ray Chapman, one of the five original Combat Masters of the Southwest Combat Pistol League, founder of the Chapman Academy and the 1976 IPSC world champion, the Chapman Technique is a hands-together method that adapts well to an isosceles or modified isosceles stance. It is perhaps the second most widely taught technique, behind the Harries. To execute the Chapman Technique, the flashlight is held in a sword grip, but only with the thumb and forefinger encircling the body of the light. The technique was developed for use with body-mounted switches on traditional "police flashlights," hence the positioning of the thumb or finger to operates the on/off button. The other three fingers of the light hand wrap around the gripping fingers of the weapon hand, in an approximation of a normal two-hand firing grip. The arms provide stabilizing isometric tension.







    Pros

    Works with small or large flashlights.
    Aligns the beam automatically with the weapon's muzzle.
    Enables a steady, two-hand support of the pistol prior to shooting.Assumed naturally and easily by isosceles or modified isosceles shooters.
    Mimics closely a normal two-handed firing grip.

    Cons

    Limited only to side-switch flashlights.
    Difficult to perform for those with small hands or with a heavy flashlight.
    Displaces alignment of the light and pistol during firing.
    Fatiguing if performed steadily for more than a few moments, especially with large flashlights.
    Proximity of hands increases the chance of a sympathetic contraction of the firing hand and induces "hand confusion."
    Weapon can bang into the flashlight during a hasty execution.
    Difficult to use with an injured hand or arm.
    Attempted alignment of the flashlight beam with the target can alter the alignment of weapon with the target, and vice versa.
    Light is located on the shooter's center of mass.




    Ayoob Technique
    Developed by famed shooting instructor Massad Ayoob, whose resume also boasts a career as a law enforcement officer, prolific writer and martial arts instructor, the Ayoob Technique is a hands-together method that utilizes isometric tension to stablize the gun-light platform. Practicing this technique emphasizes the fact that it is best suited for a quick, even unprepared and sudden, response to a nearby threat. It is less suited for searching or for prolonged operations such as house clearing. The technique is at its best in a fast and dirty CQB environment. Users find that it is not the most conducive method for shooting at assailants beyond a few feet.

    To employ the Ayoob Technique, the flashlight is grasped in sword grip with the thumb or any finger on the side-mounted on/off switch. The thumb of the flashlight hand is pressed against the thumb of the weapon hand, creating isometric tension that steadies the weapon. The hands may be held near the body in a ready position or the arms may be extended in a firing position. A variation on this technique calls for the thumb of the flashlight hand to be pressed inward just below, but still in contact with, the firing hand's thumb, thus somewhat lowering the angle of the flashlight beam. Another variation calls for pressing the fingers of the light hand against the fingers of the weapon hand, which significantly reduces the amount of wrist rotation required.







    Pros

    Assumed easily from a normal (sword) grip on a flashlight with quick, gross motor movements.
    Beam aligns automatically with the muzzle and is directed into the assailant's eyes at close range.
    Excellent close-in technique such that the flashlight can be held close to body, reducing the chance of loss due to an assailant's grabbing or accidental contact with objects.

    Cons

    Limited only to side-switch flashlights.
    Displaces the alignment of the beam and the barrel during firing.
    Fatiguing if performed steadily for more than a few moments, especially with large flashlights.
    Proximity of the hands increases the chance of a sympathetic contraction of the gun hand when the side-switch is pressed, and can cause "hand confusion."
    Weapon tends to bang into the flashlight during execution.
    Misalignment of the flashlight beam with the target can alter the alignment of the weapon with target, and vice versa.
    Light is located at the shooter's center of mass.




    FBI Technique
    In this often-maligned technique, the flashlight is held in a sword or ice pick grip, with the weak arm extended well away from the body. Often the technique involves extending the arm upward. Also, the lens of the flashlight is held slightly in front of body to avoid illuminating the user. The weapon is held in any position desired, well out of contact with the flashlight hand. The FBI Technique is probably the oldest formally taught flashlight-and-gun technique. The technique was originally emphasized as a way to prevent the user's flashlight from "marking" his exact position. By moving the light away from the user's body, an assailant who simply shot at the light source would be less likely to hit the agent. Some disparage this technique as outmoded. Advocates of specific hands-together techniques generally express this view. However, the fact is that a relaxed, movement-oriented, unstructured version of the FBI Technique, employed with proper cover, is extremely useful in room-clearing tactics and in dynamic firefight situations. This technique was frequently portrayed with the operator in a low crouch, the so-called "FBI crouch." This shooting position is separate from the flashlight technique and the two should not be considered intertwined.







    Pros

    Works with both small and large flashlights.
    Eliminates the displacement of either the beam or the firing grip upon firing.
    Reduces the chance of a sympathetic contraction of the hands that could result in an accidental discharge as the trigger is squeezed simultaneously with pressing the light's on/off button.
    Minimizes the possibility of "hand confusion" in which the user muddles up which hand has the gun and which has the light - not as far fetched as it sounds in a high-stress CQB fight.
    Enables searching with the flashlight without simultaneously pointing the muzzle with the beam, a consideration for home owners with small children or anyone who might reasonably encounter a "no-shoot" during a search.
    Peripheral light illuminates the front and rear sights, if desired.
    Minimizes exposure of the user's body during room clearing or firing around obstacles.
    Masks the precise location of the shooter - the original premise is still valid, although limited by ambient conditions such as reflective walls.
    Transitions well to the Neck Index Technique.
    Adapts for shoulder-fired weapons and transitions easily to the SFI shoulder-fired weapon technique.
    Supports the principle of "light-and-move," a fundamental tactic of low-light combatives, and can be extremely deceptive if utilized properly.
    Optimizes bilateral operation for ambidextrous shooting.

    Cons

    Limits the user to shooting one-handed.
    Difficult to maintain alignment of the beam on the threat.
    Fatiguing if performed steadily for more than a few moments, especially with large flashlights.
    Hard to use with an injured hand or arm.
    Precise, instant alignment of the flashlight beam with the target requires extensive practice.




    Hargreaves Lite-Touch Technique
    Named for Mike Hargreaves, a former British Army operator and bouncer at a boisterous bar called the Cavern Club in Liverpool, England. Mike has been a full-time firearms instructor for 20 years and a board member of IALEFI for the past 16 years. To employ the Lite-Touch Technique, the flashlight is held in the palm of the support hand. The method of deployment is to draw the pistol and light together, punch the pistol forward in a straight line at the target with the weak-hand pointing the flashlight like a fencing foil. The two hands come together, just like a two-hand punch-draw, but the weak-hand is under the pistol with the momentary tailcap pressed against the knuckles of the shooting hand.







    Pros

    Simple, effective, easy to learn. A gross motor skill, it requires less practice to ingrain than a more complex technique.
    Automatically aligns the flashlight beam with the muzzle.
    Enables steadier, two-hand support of the weapon prior to shooting.

    Cons

    Limited only to flashlights with momentary tailcaps, not with side-switch flashlights.
    Difficult to use with an injured hand or arm.
    Light is located at the user's center of mass.




    Keller Technique
    Named for Georgia State Police trooper, Van Keller, this hands-together technique has been described as merely a variation of the Harries Technique, however, it is quite distinct. To execute the Keller Technique, the flashlight is held in a sword grip, with the thumb on the on/off switch. The shooter's arms are extended outward, with the arm of the shooting hand below the arm of the flashlight hand. The wrists nest together and the back of the weapon hand presses firmly against the back of flashlight hand to create stabilizing tension. A complex motor skill, the Keller Technique must be practiced to create muscle memory in order to avoid having the pistol's slide slam into the wrist or forearm during discharge, especially when the arms aren't fully extended.







    Pros

    Aligns flashlight beam fairly well with the pistol's barrel.
    Enables steady, two-handed support of the weapon prior to shooting.

    Cons

    Limited only to side-switch flashlights.
    Displaces the beam's alignment with the pistol during firing.
    Fatiguing if performed steadily over time, especially with large flashlights.
    Proximity of the hands increases the chance of a sympathetic contraction of the gun hand when the side-switch is pressed, and can cause hand confusion.
    Difficult to use with an injured hand or arm.
    Precise, rapid alignment of the flashlight beam with the target requires extensive practice.
    Misalignment of the flashlight beam with the target can alter the alignment of the weapon with target, and vice versa.
    Light is located at the shooter's center of mass.




    Neck-Index Technique
    One of the newest techniques to be developed, the Neck-Index Technique, is the culmination of much experimintation. It is a hands-apart technique in which the flashlight is held in an ice pick grip and the handgun is held in either the strong- or weak-hand. The first published description of this technique appeared in a June, 1994 magazine article by Brian Puckett and, since Americans love nothing more than to pigeonhole things, it was immediately dubbed the Puckett Technique. However, a version of this technique for use with SureFire's compact, powerful lithium-powered lights was taught by Ken Good and Dave Maynard of Combative Concepts about two years prior to the '94 article. Puckett and Good now use the term Neck Index Technique.

    Employing the Neck Index requires that the light's reflector is held indexed against the jaw/neck juncture just below the ear, so that it moves in conjunction with user's head, yet blocks little peripheral vision. The thumb is placed on the momentary tailcap switch, if using a SureFire CombatLight, or a finger is positioned on the body-mounted switch, if using an old-style flashlight. For the older, large "police flashlights," the flashlight body is rested on the shoulder, indexed against the base of the neck. For compact, lithium-powered flashlights, the body of the flashlight, or the fist holding it, is indexed against the neck. The weapon is held in any position desired, out of contact with flashlight hand or arm.

    An ancillary benefit of the Neck Index Technique is that it utilizes the same basic position as the common method of cops when they interview suspects - resting the light on the shoulder in order to deliver a fast strike if the suspect suddenly becomes aggressive. By employing a similar position, the Neck Index Technique allows an ergonomic, tactical and even psychological benefit. The Neck Index Technique breaks from the trend of hands-together techniques that have been universal since the Harries was first introduced. The goal of hands-together techniques is to steady the shooting hand and keep the flashlight beam aligned with the gun barrel. Good and Maynard's dynamic combat techniques did not require this, and anyone who has tested different techniques in a CQB environment - and not just on the range - will agree that the ability to take cover and shoot bilaterally from around corners more than offsets the putative drawback of the Neck Index's less stability than a hands-together technique.







    Pros

    Clear illumination of the sights and the target simultaneously.
    Natural transition from the FBI Technique.
    Works with small or large flashlights.
    Adapts to both side-switch and rear tailcap on/off modes.
    Minimizes muscle fatigue for large flashlights as the weight is borne almost entirely by the user's body.
    Eliminates beam/grip displacement upon firing.
    Reduces the chance of a sympathetic contraction of the hands that could result in an accidental discharge as the trigger is squeezed simultaneously with pressing the light's on/off button.
    Minimizes the possibility of "hand confusion" in which the user muddles up which hand has the gun and which has the light - not as far fetched as it sounds in a high-stress CQB fight.
    Enables searching with the flashlight independently of "sweeping" potential no-shoots with the weapon's muzzle.
    Aligns the beam with the target such that there is no effect on the alignment of the weapon with the target.
    Emergency strike can be delivered since the flashlight is "cocked" above the shoulder.
    Usable with injured hand or arm, as it virtually duplicates the body's natural "flipper position" of a wounded limb.
    Supports an aligned body position for movement in any direction.
    Excellent for ambidextrous firing during lateral movement.
    Transitions easily to "light-forward, weapon-back" deployment for maximizing weapon retention in close quarters.
    Supports the "power with light" principle of low-light combative tactics.
    Easy to use bilaterally.

    Cons

    User must shoot one-handed.
    Can create excess "splash" of light off the rear of the weapon if the user is not familiar with the proper applications of the technique.
    Light is located near the shooter's head.

    Ken J. Good was the founding director of the SureFire Institute. His company, Strategos International, conducts authorized SureFire Institute training for qualified law enforcement and military personnel. For more information on classes available, contact Ken at www.strategosinternational.com or call toll-free to 888-LOW-LIGHT.
     
  12. possum

    possum Member

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2005
    Messages:
    8,942
    Location:
    Concord, N.C.
    i use surefire handheld lights with the tailcp switch, so for easy on and off that is one but by no means the only reason why i hold it like you described. it also allows you to transition from different postions depeding on the situation at hand. also it gives me a better range of motion and alows me to put the light in more locations than i would be able to in the "dagger" hold!

    though this is the way that i hold a handheld light i much prefer weapon mounted lights instead. and regardless of what people say about the light goig where your gun does, ok there is a reason and a need for hand held lights if you have one but if you don't the weapon mounted can be just as good, i hav etrainned with both and i prefer the weapon mounted. i have had 0 isues usin weapon mounted lights on weapons, in the states or the sandbox.
     
  13. Old NFO

    Old NFO Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2004
    Messages:
    494
    Location:
    Arlington, VA
    I have used/trained with both the Rogers/Surefire and 3 cell Maglights. Each has it's advantages and disadvantages, but what ever technique you use, you MUST practice in low light or darkness until it becomes second nature...

    A word of caution with any hands together technique, if there is smoke/fog you will effectively blind yourself! We did a night shoot down in NC where a smoke pot was used to simulate a vehicle fire between you and the BG's- Everyone who used the hands together technique lost time/accuracy due to the reflection from the smoke. Those who were using single hand were able to drop the lights below the smoke and illuminate the target fairly quickly.
     
  14. sacp81170a

    sacp81170a Member

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2004
    Messages:
    2,410
    Location:
    Farmington, AR
    Jim, this was one of the techniques I was trained in, as well as the SureFire method, the Harries, the hypodermic technique, etc. I've seen more than one salty old patrolman or sergeant use the FBI technique almost exclusively when clearing built up areas. Why? Primarily because it's so natural. No funky hand placement to learn or get confused by, easy to maintain, and if you train to shoot one-handed you will hit what you're aiming at. A study of police dash cam videos of shooting incidents showed that in a large percentage of officer involved shootings, the shooting was done with one hand. Very few officers will take that nice two handed grip in the heat of the moment, they just draw and SHOOT!

    For this reason, we practice one handed shooting extensively. You almost always have something in your off hand that prevents you getting it into the fight immediately, whether it's a flashlight, a ticket book, or whatever. If you get caught at the academy carrying something in your gun hand you will be doing pushups for it. Not hitting your target shooting with one hand just means that you haven't trained properly.

    Once you've got that covered, use whatever technique you're good with and strikes your fancy. I like to keep it simple.

    Oh, and one more thing, try holding your handgun in high retention with anything but the FBI or neck index techniques. Lead around a corner with my gun and my light? No thanks.
     
  15. Erik

    Erik Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2002
    Messages:
    1,660
    Location:
    USA
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice