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I have to get over having a pretty target

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by ChickenHawk, Oct 15, 2006.

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  1. ChickenHawk

    ChickenHawk Member

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    At home when I practice dry-fire I can draw and shoot quickly and easily.

    I just got back from the range. 150 rounds mostly at 15 yards through a hole that blows about 4 inches out of the middle of my target.

    Here's the thing, when I'm actually shooting at something I know I hesitate as much as a second longer, and the trigger definitely feels "harder" to pull.

    I'm certain it's because I love those pretty targets with the center blown out so I take longer to get the shot off. I really think it's holding me back from being a better shooter though.

    Anybody else struggle with this? Got a good technique to break this habit? Or should I just get over it and pull the darn trigger harder at the range?

    Thanks,
    ChickenHawk
     
  2. bumm

    bumm Member

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    I've noticed when I'm having a frustrating day with lots of flyers, I'm generally concentrating too much on the target. When I dry fire, I put all my attention on the back sight picture... that is, keeping the front blade in perfect position in the back notch. When I start thinking more about how I dry fire, let the target go blurry and concentrate on keeping the back sight picture motionless, my groups tighten up.
    In other words, pretend you're dry firing.
    Marty
     
  3. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    Set your target up farther away and change it more often so you can't spot your shots as you go. That will let you concentrate on the aim and break.
     
  4. RH822

    RH822 Member

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    Use different targets if your range allows it. I shoot much better (less group consciouses) using a small 3-D targets like pop-cans, plastic 20oz bottles or clay pigeons. With a target that small (defensively speaking) a hit is a hit regardless of group size. Shooting at smaller 6"x6" paper target would probably produce the same result if your confined to an indoor range.

    RH
     
  5. ChickenHawk

    ChickenHawk Member

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    Hmmm, I must not be getting the point you guys are trying to make to me.

    Won't I be MORE target conscious if I change the targe more often? The way I typically shoot, the only holes I notice are the ones which don't go through the middle since the first 20 rounds pretty much starts to make a hole. If I keep putting up fresh targets I'll see every shot.

    Truth is, I don't look for holes while I am shooting. I did break myself of that bad habit. But, after each magazine I'll stop and look down range for flyers.

    Jim, If I move the target further back, won't that make me want to pause even longer to insure I'm sight aligned?

    I think I am taking pretty good shots when dry-firing. I'm just trying to find a good way to get my actual shooting speed up to my dry-fire speed.

    Does that make sense? :eek:

    Cheers,
    ChickenHawk
     
  6. 10-Ring

    10-Ring Member

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    It's tough...I find myself doing basically the same thing. I sometimes find it difficult to let go and allow all that training to kick it & all that muscle memory that's been developed do its thing and just shoot like you know you can.
    it take a bit of practice...it's a Zen thing :scrutiny: Just trust in the force Luke :cool:
     
  7. Standing Wolf

    Standing Wolf Member in memoriam

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    When I was learning to draw as a boy, I found myself laboring endlessly over fine detail in pieces that were often poorly composed. By and bye, it occured to me deliberately to "waste" paper by trying to work as fast as I possibly could. Detail? There was none—but my compositions suddenly began to take on life.

    In due time, I began to "waste" entire sketch books, which is to say: deliberately worked as quickly as possible, abandoned pieces almost at the outset, and rampaged on to their successors.

    I don't still draw much, if only because digital art tools are so much more flexible and extensible, but thinking that way is still very much with me.

    It might be worth your while to "waste" a great many targets, each with one or two or three shots. That will work if you're keen on the shooting rather than the net result of your shooting.

    Best of success to you, eh?
     
  8. Geronimo45

    Geronimo45 Member

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    Maybe you should just get a blank sheet of paper and shoot it instead - see how fast you can fire with all the rounds in that sheet.
     
  9. ChickenHawk

    ChickenHawk Member

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    That's exactly what I'm keen on, and probably exactly what I should do. I'm going to give this a try and stay with it for a while to see how it works out over a period of time.

    Good suggestions. Thanks! Still open to more! :)

    Cheers,
    ChickenHawk
     
  10. facedown

    facedown Member

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    Maybe you should just get a blank sheet of paper and shoot it instead ...

    Excellent advice. I mostly shoot paper plates - 2 dinner size side-by-side or four snack size in a box shape.
     
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