Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

"In praise of gunsmiths" or "Those $%&@*# Italians!"

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by PrudentGT, Jun 24, 2004.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. PrudentGT

    PrudentGT Member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2003
    Messages:
    203
    Location:
    Bay Area, PRK
    Friend from work was telling me about his troubled Beretta 85F a couple weeks ago. "Ug. It no shoot." So I (stupidly) offer to take a look at it. Slide stop spring is *missing* and trigger spring has sheared in twain. Okay. So I call Beretta for a couple of springs. One of the springs they sent was the wrong one, so I called again and today the trigger spring arrives. Nice customer service, BTW.

    I don't know who designed this thing, but let me tell you about the nightmare that installing this spring was. the spring has two loops. The front one lies horizontal in the frame and provides tension for the button that locks the takedown lever in position. The larger rear loop sits in the trigger and is held in place by the pin from the slide stop lever. Behind that is a hook that tensions on the pin on the front of the trigger bar. After an hour trying to first place the front of the spring into the takedown lever button and then trying to push the large coil into the trigger with no luck, I had to change tactics. I captured the spring in the trigger, with a toothpick where the trigger spring would go and lodging another toothpick where the trigger bar pin would go to tension it. Clipped the toothpicks flush with the trigger, put the trigger in the frame and painstakingly adjusted it so that I could juuuust slide the front of the spring into the takedown button (I used a fork to align the spring with the teensy hole in the takedown button). Sliding the slide stop pin into place and shoving the toothpick out was easy (it exits the opposite side of the frame). The pin from the trigger bar however was a whole different ballgame, however, since there's NO HOLE on the opposite end of the frame for the toothpick to exit from. So I ended up cutting the toothpick in situ as it were and easing it out. Pocket knife held the spring hook while I moved the trigger forward and managed to get the trigger bar pin in place, whereupon the spring hook fell nicely back into place. *WHEW* By now I know this thing inside and out, better than any of *my* pistols! It *was* nice to see a perfectly functioning pistol instead of the poor, sickly little .380 that I started with, but what a pain!

    Long story short, I have a far better appreciation for gunsmiths today. =)
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2004
  2. mete

    mete Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2002
    Messages:
    3,579
    Location:
    NY
    Take a close look at a gunsmith, you'll see that he has three hands !! I've been to gunsmithing school so I know all about that .
     
  3. TonyB

    TonyB Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    2,153
    Location:
    Schodack NY
    Those I-talians are famous for making great things that are hard to work on...like guns and motorcycles....my Father had a wiring problem with a MotoGuzzi years ago,and (after having my grandfather translated the manual)did a lot of cursing of our ancestors:D
    Just remember Italy is socalist(kind of like California)...:cool:
     
  4. Third_Rail

    Third_Rail Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2004
    Messages:
    4,981
    I found out a few years ago that when Italian goods do what they're supposed to, they do it well, and when they break, they REALLY break.
     
  5. Das Pferd

    Das Pferd Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2004
    Messages:
    350
    Sorry I couldnt help myself.
     
  6. Jim K

    Jim K Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2002
    Messages:
    17,752
    Hi, PrudentGT,

    I am not very familiar with that pistol but it sounds like you have (re) discovered the "slave pin" (although I understand it is now politically correct to call it a "helper pin"). Gunsmiths know all about these and how to use them, proving once more that gunsmiths, like most of us, get paid for what they know, not what they do. Gunsmiths also have a third hand, called a padded jaw vise. Don't do pistol work without it.

    Jim
     
  7. Penman

    Penman Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2002
    Messages:
    576
    Hence the gunsmith's favorite saying:

    "You want it WHEN?"
     
  8. nvrquit

    nvrquit Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2002
    Messages:
    339
    Location:
    Bernville, PA
    It would make a neat...

    ... T-shirt:D

    Das Pferd,

    Mind if I "borrow" the quote or perhaps you could let me know where same originated, so I could make sure that I'm not infringing on any others rights.

    Thanks!
     
  9. Treylis

    Treylis Member

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2003
    Messages:
    1,332
    Location:
    Tempe, Arizona
    It's a real old one, and unattributed originally, as far as I know. Go wild.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page