Is a Yugo 24/52c just a rearsenaled czech vz24/g24t?

Discussion in 'Firearms Research' started by matchinson14, Jan 3, 2015.

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  1. matchinson14

    matchinson14 Member

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    I found a "Yugo mauser 24/52c" for sale for $300 online. I was wondering if these are just the same as a yugo 24/47 with intermediate action, or if a 24/52c is a captured cazech vz24/g24t with the large ring 98 action since the Germans issued something like 350,000 of them to troops. So is it a reworked Czech or is it pure yugo? It has the diviets cut into the stock for grip, unlike many of the yugos I have seen, but which all the czechs I've seen had.
     
  2. Jim K

    Jim K Member.

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    The 24/47 is a refurbished FN Model 1924 with an intermediate receiver, same as the Model 48. The 24/52c is a refurbished Czech Vz. 24, a "standard" Model 98 action.

    The confusion originated in 1924 when the new Yugoslav government bought Model 1924 rifles from Fabrique Nationale in Belgium. Earlier, FN had obtained the rights from Mauser to manufacture rifles based on an 1896 patent, which had a different breeching setup and a shorter action from the later M1898 rifles. FN later licensed the Yugoslavs to make those rifles and sold them the machinery and tooling. The Czechs, using German machinery obtained as reparations after WWI, manufactured a different Model 1924, with the so-called "standard" Mauser 98 action.

    Jim
     
  3. matchinson14

    matchinson14 Member

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    Thanks. That's about what I figured. Do you know if the refurbed vz24 's were purchased directly from the Czechs, or if they were captured during the war when the yugoslavs pushed the Germans out? Either way 300 dollars for a refurbed to like new condition vz24 seems like a good deal to me. Think I'll pick one up. Thanks for the reply.
     
  4. Jim K

    Jim K Member.

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    Yugoslavia purchased some 92,000 Czach Vz 24's in 1925-29 period from Czechoslovakia; they called them the Model 24c. (The "c" stands for Czechoslovakia to distinguish them from the FN Model 24). AFAIK, those were the basis for the 24/52c. As far as I can determine (and I will be happy to be corrected), most of those rifles spent the war in depots. The Germans apparently never made use of them and the guerrilla war against the Germans did not require any large number of rifles. Besides, the resistance got most of its arms from the Russians and the British, each of which supplied its favored faction, the Russians supporting the Communists under Tito and the West supporting the Chetniks under Mihajlović.

    One company claimed that the Model 48, named for that year, was a K.98k, and was made by the Germans during WWII, an absurd statement but one which some ignorant people actually believed.

    Jim
     
  5. matchinson14

    matchinson14 Member

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    ^From what I've heard that company was probably Mitchell's Mausers: who are notorious for shady product descriptions.
     
  6. matchinson14

    matchinson14 Member

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    So I'd essentially be getting an unissued vz24. That's great! I think I'll take the vz24/52c instead of the 24/47. The 47 is about 60 dollars less but from what I've heard the Czech models tend to be better quality on average.
     
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