Lead balls per pound.

Discussion in 'Blackpowder' started by hawg, Dec 24, 2021.

  1. hawg

    hawg Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2011
    Messages:
    1,648
    Location:
    Mississippi
    If you ever wanted to know how many balls you can get from a pound of lead, I found this chart.

    hENv6PZl.jpg
     
    1KPerDay, hrt4me, gobsauce and 4 others like this.
  2. bersaguy

    bersaguy Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2011
    Messages:
    1,321
    Location:
    Tampa Bay
    Recently found this out, and find is very interesting that the 2 most common pistol calibers, 36, and 45 correspond to 100 and 50 balls respectively. Not sure if that's coincidence, or something that was taken into consideration in the days before elongated projectiles. Sure are a lot of 100ga pistols out there;)
     
    hrt4me likes this.
  3. Eyrie G. Dogg

    Eyrie G. Dogg Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2018
    Messages:
    335
    Was .36 common before the Patterson or .44 prior to Walkers?
     
  4. bersaguy

    bersaguy Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2011
    Messages:
    1,321
    Location:
    Tampa Bay
    Eyrie G. Dogg and hrt4me like this.
  5. Armored farmer

    Armored farmer Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2010
    Messages:
    10,498
    Location:
    South Eastern Illinois
    Of course that's how we get guage numbers...12 ga is 12 balls/lb
    20 ga is 20balls/lb.
    Etc
     
    whughett, hrt4me, gobsauce and 2 others like this.
  6. hawg

    hawg Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2011
    Messages:
    1,648
    Location:
    Mississippi
    .36 was popular in rifles but they took .350 balls
     
    Eyrie G. Dogg and hrt4me like this.
  7. bersaguy

    bersaguy Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2011
    Messages:
    1,321
    Location:
    Tampa Bay
    Exactly, 12 balls, thats a dozen, makes sense, 16 balls...16 very common, 16, oz in 1 lb, its a highly divisible number, used for centuries in British currency, 20 ga, nice round number, 28 balls per lb.......uh.....idk....must be French:D
     
    hrt4me and troy fairweather like this.
  8. StrawHat

    StrawHat Member

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2007
    Messages:
    4,865
    Location:
    NE Ohio
    In revolvers, the 31 was probably the most popular caliber. It doesn’t fall in line with the 44/36 idea.

    Kevin
     
    gtrgy888 likes this.
  9. gtrgy888

    gtrgy888 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2021
    Messages:
    342
    Location:
    Western US
    That doesn’t seem coincidental. It must have simplified logistics enormously to know an approximate weight per number of lead balls. It also accounts for the .36 Navy being more commonly used in union Army service with .44’s reserved mostly for troops facing horses (cavalry, dragoons). Twice as many shots for the same weight carried. If the .36 made the same enemy casualties with half the lead and 3/4 the powder, why waste resources going heavier?
     
    hrt4me and bersaguy like this.
  10. StrawHat

    StrawHat Member

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2007
    Messages:
    4,865
    Location:
    NE Ohio
    It has also been mentioned that the weight of a conical bullet in the lesser caliber equaled the weight of the larger caliber round ball. Not sure if that has more meaning than gauges of round ball. To me, they are both arbitrary and meaningless.

    Kevin
     
    Blackpowderwarrior likes this.
  11. gtrgy888

    gtrgy888 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2021
    Messages:
    342
    Location:
    Western US
    A 140 grain .36 conical over 21 grains of powder (a maximal loading) is nearly the same in terminal impact as a 147 grain .44 roundball over 21 grains of powder (a light loading), so there is a degree of overlap. Similar to the 9 mm vs. .45 acp debate, those who shoot the lighter caliber don’t see a necessity to upgrade for a mere 100 foot pounds extra, and those shooting the heavier caliber see no reason to shed that marginal ballistic advantage.
     
    hrt4me and StrawHat like this.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice