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Military possiblilities in my future... hmmm

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by PT1911, Sep 7, 2010.

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  1. PT1911

    PT1911 Member

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    So, I am 24, single, and have few obligations to my area. I am in shape, and have a college degree (bsn) and got to wondering about military possibilities and what those could potentially mean. Travel here, there, back to there, and wherever. It could potentially be a great opportunity to gain quite a bit of experience in the medical field as well as go back to school for further degrees. Of course there are the risks that come along with it. These days are pretty unpredictable.

    SO, lets make this gun related... I have a somewhat extensive collection of guns (estimate 30 or so between rifles, shotties, and pistols/revolvers.) With the inevitable and unpredictable travel that would come with this potential change, what are the most appropriate options for the guns? Hell, within the US the laws are so varied that one must damn near have a law degree to understand the differences from one state to another. I hate to even begin to try figure out what travel outside the US would mean.

    SO, in the opinion of the brilliant minds that make up this evergrowing compilation of my fellow gun nuts, what are the most appropriate options on the table should I decide to pull the metaphoric trigger on this decision?
     
  2. jim in Anchorage

    jim in Anchorage Member

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    30 guns at age 24? Impressive. Any family or friends who would store the guns for you?
     
  3. PT1911

    PT1911 Member

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    HA... yeah, i got the syndrome pretty bad... I have one friend who is the MOST likely candidate for someone I would trust enough to take care of my guns sufficiently. Family members are limited. Family members I would trust to the task are even more limited. I suppose that sort of answers the question right there, but still up for any suggestions as I will avoid inconveniencing him if possible.

    Then again, what is the inconvenience of an additional "couple" of guns to those who share the interest?
     
  4. Patriotme

    Patriotme Member

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    You will not be able to take your personal weapons with you overseas. You will also not be able to take any personal weapons with you depending on which base you're assigned to. It's not unusual to get a NRA story in which servicemen are banned from keeping their weapons on base (in the armory). I recently read a story in which those in base housing could not keep weapons. Those that had weapons off base had to register them with the military. The policies seem to vary from base to base. I would check the NRA site for more info.
    Good luck to you if you decide to join. With that said I would like to remind you to get everything in writing when dealing with recruiters. If it's not in writing then it's not guarenteed. Should you sign up for a MOS such as machinegunner, infantry, truck driver, etc and get a guarenteed duty station in CA, Hawaii, FL, etc you may find that your "Guarentee" doesn't count as the needs of the military come first. Anyway....if you're getting a guarenteed MOS, bonus, rank, etc make sure that it's in the contract. Should you get in a fight, go AWOL, etc you may find your contract guarentees voided. I saw this happen to a six year enlistee when I was in the Marines. Recruiters have a mission to put bodies in their branch of the military. They will twist the truth until it's like a pretzel to meet their quotas. If anyone tells you there is no quota they are lying to you. BTW, I worked for my recruiter (lying POS) for about a month after boot camp and got to see first hand how they operate. Don't get me wrong. They serve their country, have an extremely hard job to do and have a lot of stress. They do an important job. Just remember that they are not your buddy and deal with them as you would a car salesman.
     
  5. Ragnar Danneskjold

    Ragnar Danneskjold Member

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    You could always go Guard and just lock your guns up with family or a very trusted friend while you're away. That's what I did. Been in the Army National Guard for 3.5 years now, and in that span I have had time to get another Associates, complete a police academy, and go back for my bachelor's. All with some hefty financial assistance courtesy of all of you (thank you btw). IMO, the Guard is the best of both worlds. Solid military training and experience, the chance to participate in the War on Terror, all while maintaining your home life and continuing your education. AND, you won't have to totally part with your guns for multiple years.

    And to echo the above poster...get everything in writing before you go anywhere. If your recruiter says, "they'll take care of that when you get to your training center" he's lying. Get everything you want, on paper, before you sign anything or go anywhere. And btw, if you go enlisted, you can use those college credits to get in as high as an E-4 right from the get go.
     
  6. Patriotme

    Patriotme Member

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    One more thing.
    Recruiters try to fill their quota each month. Say that they have met their quota this month and have you and another guy (excess people...this is their dream come true) ready to go in. They may try to push back your month for arriving at boot camp in order to space out their people and meet a future quota. I went through this and finally told my recruiter that he broke my contract when he moved my enlistment date the first two times and if it happened again we were done.
    The higher your ASVAP score the more jobs that become open to you. If you're 24 then you've been out of the public schools for a while and you might want to brush up on the algebra. It might be worth it to buy the ASVAP guides at Barnes And Noble. Obviously the score required for a grunt is lower than that for a medic. There may only be one or two openings for your MOS open in any given month at your recruiting station. This may push back your enlistment date as well. Recruiting stations can swap MOS's and trade.
    The better you look (high ASVAP, no drug waivers, no DUI's, no dependents, fit, etc) the more barginning power you have.
    I don't want to blast recruiters too much because they have a very hard job to do, are unappreciated and have a great deal of stress. They do the job required of them but sometimes that job is kind of dirty and YOU need to look out for YOU. Once you make it through boot camp (they lose your body count if you drop out) you are going to be a memory to them.
     
  7. Bob R

    Bob R Member

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    Let's put the guns on the back burner for a while.

    If you go in the military as an officer and can do the 20 years, you will retire in your late 40's (maybe a little bit earlier). Be a hard charger and you will end up an O5, today the base pay for an O5 over 20 yrs is about 8K. You would get 50% of that as your retirement for the rest of your life. Be an exceptionaly hard charger and go higher.

    While there you will be given opportunities that most nurses can only dream about, responsibility and advanced education are two very big ones. I know several doctors that started off as an RN in the Navy and just went up from there with the Navy footing the bill all the way.

    Now for the guns.

    Find a local gun shop that you can try to talk into a long term contract for storage if you need it.

    While going to schools you will need it, you can't take your guns with you. You can always move your guns with you to your permanent stations. As long as you don't have NFA weapons I don't ssee a lot of issues with most of the places you can be stationed, other than CA or overseas.

    The gun situation will have to be dealt with as it arises, the situation could be different for each state you are stationed in.

    If and when you decide to pursue a military job, make sure you talk to a nurse recruiter so you can get to correct info on any questions you have. Just go to the service of your choice website and there should be something about contacting a nurse or officer recruiter.

    If I can be of any help, encouragement or a sounding board, just send an email to my listed email here.

    bob
     
  8. luigi

    luigi Member

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    You can make much more money out of the military than in. You also won't be owned by the government, The only way I'd join in your situation if they paid of your student loans
     
  9. loadedround

    loadedround Member

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    Have you considered preparing your guns properly for storage and renting a storage locker on a long term basis. Check different storage companies as it's possible that one may offer a good deal for a member of the military. Once you get situated and buy a house, a large gun safe will serve your needs on other deployments. As other's have said, get whatever is offered to you in writing (aka contract). Also check all three services for the best offer. A BSN should be a direct commision as a Captain, and an RN as a 1st LT. Remember an Air force Flight Nurse draws flight pay...a nice chunk of extra change. Good luck to you!
     
  10. rocky branch

    rocky branch Member

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    I grew up when service was a civic duty and an opportunity for experience, training and adventure.
    Money was of little consideration.
    You can do a single enlistment and decide what you want when that is finished.
    Meanwhile you will have somethings under your belt that shirkers only dream about.
    Plus first hand stories to bore your grandkids with.

    Initially, long term storage is your best option.
     
  11. MisterMike

    MisterMike Member

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    I spent a total of 27 years in the Air Force, combined active and reserve, and I loved it. This is not the right venue for advice on a military career, but I can offer a little insight into the gun ownership implications.

    I was not into firearms as much as I currently am, but I did have a handful of guns when I joined the military. I sold them fairly soon after joining, since I found that it was more trouble than I was willing to put up with to own them. First, you'll find that most military installations ban privately owned guns on base, requiring them to be locked up in an armory or stored in an off-base location. So, military housing--which I only ever used once anyway--is incompatible with gun possession.

    Also, you may find yourself at least occasionally stationed in locations where you can't own a gun. I had two consecutive assignments to the U.K., where, even back in the 80's, it wasn't an option.

    The bottom line? I loved my time serving in the USAF, and it provided opportunities that I would never have enjoyed elsewhere. Like most things, it is what you make of it. But, you'll find it, at a minimum, more difficult to own guns. For me, it was a price worth paying in order to serve my country.
     
  12. alohachris

    alohachris Member

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    The OP's an RN-BSN. That's an automatic O-1 Comission, yeah?
     
  13. MisterMike

    MisterMike Member

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    Right. AFAIK, the services are all in need of nurses. Without dissing the enlisted corps, the OP should definitely seek a commission. First, it will pay better. However, on a much more basic level, the OP will not practice as an RN unless commissioned as one and brought into the nursing/medical corps.
     
  14. Bob R

    Bob R Member

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    It depends oon time as a nurse up to this point. It could be an O1 with accelerated advancement to O2(as little as one year), or with enough experience possibly straight to O2. As he is only 24 y/o I don't see enough experience to go in as an O3.

    bob
     
  15. LRS_Ranger

    LRS_Ranger Member

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    Alrighty.. Since God hates me, I got sent to be a recruiter for 3 years... So if you really want the scoop from a current NCO on recruiting duty, (I'll never be a recruiter, HA) PM me. There is some pretty bad info on this thread, and since it's not gun related, I won't bother to correct it on the public forum.

    On to the gun related part. You are not allowed to have guns in the barracks. When I lived in the barracks, I got a nice heated indoor storage unit and put a gun safe in there. That was where I kept all my stuff I didn't want to be "Inspectable" and then I just never told anyone about it. It was my "bat cave". This is not in any way against regulation, but being a private some things were better left unsaid. However you can have them at your on-base house. You will be authorized an on-base residence if you go in as an officer, or if you get married. Some bases are overcrowded and they are kicking E-4's off base, but I wouldn't count on that. If you have your weapons on your on-base residence, you must have them registered by the PMO, which is like the on base police. Any gun that goes on the base is supposed to be registered, so I registered my 30-30 as that was what I took on to go hunting all the time.

    If you live off base (a very good chance if you go in as an O) you will not have to register and there is no limit on what you can have. I have heard that they are currently trying to pass some regulations that will allow commanders to be able to control that, but I wouldn't count on it being an issue. In my old unit, everyone had guns and went hunting, and the commander would never have thought of trying to regulate stuff. If they do pass the reg it will be the most disregarded regulation in the army. Whatever. Nobody is coming over to my house to check on my stuff, and they sure aren't getting into my safe if they do.

    For deployments you will be authorized to store your personal belongings in either military storage, or one of your choosing. If you wanted you could load your safe in the back of your truck and drive it to your parents or something.

    I loved my time in the real army, and I can't wait to get back when I get done with this retarded recruiting gig. The army is where I met all the gun nut people that got me into shooting, reloading, hunting, IDPA etc. If you like shooting things, you can defanately find a place to fit in. If you feel the need to as well, you can get your firearms individually insured. I think I paid $100/yr for a 10,000 price limit with USAA. Not bad at all. Like I said, PM me and I will let you know how things are working now (with OCS too).
     
  16. Tacbandit

    Tacbandit Member

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    Deleted...
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2010
  17. SSN Vet

    SSN Vet Member

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    My wife's cousin's husband is an Army nurse and loves his job. He's now an O-3 and appears to be in it for the long haul.

    I don't know what the drill is in the other services, but I helped process in medical field types at the Navy Officer Program Recruiting Station where I went to college for a short TAD stint. If the Navy (or other service) isn't paying for you education, then you should expect some decent up front cash to sign on. In the navy, nurses come in as O-1s and docs as O-3s, and they all go through 8 weeks of Officer Indoctrination School (OIS, or "Knife and Fork School"), which is in Newport, RI.

    I think the military medical path is a great one, and think you will find that you get greater experience and responsibility in a shorter period of time than in the civilian workplace. Of course, your going to bust your a$$ more as well, and the miilitary will own you for some time.

    Education opportunities will be very good.... and highly encouraged. After you initial tour of duty, you should easilly be able to get into a mastor's program. Just keep in mind, that the standard "payback" is 2 for 1. Meaning that if the navy sends you to grad. school for a year, you will owe them 2 years of active duty afterwards.

    But you may very well be able to pick up your masters at night, having the navy re-imburse you the tuition costs and not have a contractual payback, as they didn't send you to school full time.

    Getting a masters and then getting certified as a physicians asst. would be a good way to go imho.

    Don't let your guns play into the decision at all is my advice.

    As and officer you can usually live out in town if you chose to. And then it's no different than any other environment.

    I don't know what the other services do for extended deployments, but in the navy, you should still be elligable for your BAQ and VHA when you're deployed. So you just maintain your residence while you're at sea. Of course, if your stationed for shore duty over seas, it's going to be different, and much dependant on the country your in.

    If you can't live off base for some reason, you'll have to store your stuff. So just rent a storage locker and lay up your guns as appropriate.

    Good luck to you... whatever you decide
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2010
  18. ATBackPackin

    ATBackPackin Member

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    Hey I say as long as that is what you want to do and know what you are getting yourself into, I say go for it. The military is a totally different type of lifestyle, but it can be a lot of fun as well. Meet a lot of great people and travel places you may not have done on your own. As it was already said you could retire by the age of 45. After that you still have enough time to put into another 20 years somewhere else and get a double retirement.

    When I was in the Marines everybody had a lot of respect for the Navy docs. I think they will also give you money for your student loans you already have as well as give you money for furthering your education if you so wish.

    After you get out, unless you get a Big Chicken Dinner, I guarantee you will always get bonus points over other applicants for being prior military.

    DO NOT trust recruiters. I say again, do not trust recruiters. I'm not bashing them, but their job is to get you to sign that dotted line by just about any means necessary. My advise would be not to sign anything until you have triple checked everything from multiple sources.

    I had a friend in MCT that had two, not one but two, BS's and he wasn't sure what he wanted to do in the Marines so his recruiter sold him on going open contract stating that with his education the Marines would put him somewhere to utilize him the best. He ended up a cook.

    I scored a 94 on my ASVAB and my recruiter was doing back flips saying I could do anything I wanted in the Marines. I told him I wanted to be an aircraft mechanic. He told me there were no openings at the time, which I found out later was not true. I then said I wanted to be an MP, to which he said I couldn't because I had a couple of misdemeanors on my record, which I found out later I could have got a waiver for. So much for being able to do anything I want. I told him I didn't know then what I wanted to do and again a recruiter told me I should go open contract and the Marines would put where I could be best utilized with my scores. Stupidly I did, but I got really lucky. We were all sitting around the MEPS station the morning we were shipping off to Paris Island when a SSgt came out calling for me. I was thinking to myself what the hell did I do? He told me to follow him, that the MstSgt wanted to talk to me. At this point I'm really sweating bullets and trying to figure what on earth this could be about. We get to his office and I'm told to report to the MstSgt, so I do. He stands up from behind his desk and yells at me loud enough for everyone at the other end of the long hallway where we just came from could hear this conversation:

    MstSgt: Are you :cuss: retarded?
    Me: Sir?
    MstSgt: Don't call me sir, I work for a living. (my first one of those :p)
    Me: Sorry MstSgt, no I am not retarded.
    MstSgt: Did you really score a 94 on your ASVAB?
    Me: Yes MstSgt.
    MstSgt: Then why the :cuss: are you going open contract? Do you want to be a cook or a grunt?
    Me: No I do not MstSgt.
    MstSgt: Alright then, I'm signing you up for Electronics and Calibrations.
    MstSgt: You will thank me later dummy.

    Which I did many, many times and I only regret that I never got the chance to thank him personally. I ended up a 2841 and I really liked it. I did however end up in a grunt unit, 6Th Marines ND Mar Div. Can't complain though because I also ended up a motorcycle courier in the field and we went to the field a lot.

    Bottom line is do not sign anything until you are absolutely positive you know what it is and have it in writing.

    As far as the guns, let someone you really trust keep them until you get to your duty station. You said you have a friend you trust that much and I wouldn't think it would be a burden especially if you say he can get some playing time with them. I'm pretty sure officers can have private guns on base housing, but yes you will have to register them. However, I doubt you will get base housing for a while if you want it at all, so you can keep them in your house off base.

    Best of luck and keep us updated. I'm sure there are plenty of vets here that would give you some great advise via email or PM.

    Shawn
     
  19. Dokkalfar

    Dokkalfar Member

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    I would suggest looking at OCS or Guard, depending on how much you want to be involved with the military. I'm kind of doing both, with the SMP program (ROTC/Guard). Basically, here are the options I would think would be best for you:

    - Straight National Guard. You'll be able to join a unit close to where you live (usually within an hour's drive) so having civilian living quarters is not an issue, you'll be able to maintain your firearms there and not worry about armory storage, registration, etc. However, you will still need a civilian job as once-a-month doesnt pay very well (you'll likely go in as E4 or E5 pay, based on college hours/degree. I have 58 so far and started my Guard as E3, though once contracted with ROTC its bumped up to E5.)

    - SMP program/ROTC. This'll enable to to go for a Master's program, and have the Guard/Army pay for it. You'll still be in the Guard/Army until you finish and graduate, but in a non-deployable status, and you'll incur a 4-year or so obligation with the Guard or active duty. You'll have the same non-issue with your firearms as above while you're in school, but once you graduate, if you go the Army route you'll have the armory/friend storage issues.

    - OCS. This'll get you straight to officer corps, since you already have a bachelor's degree. You will have the same issues with firearm storage though.



    Overall, with a degree and military aspirations, going for the officer corps is definitely a better choice. Better pay, benefits, and so on.

    For your firearms, Guard would be a good choice as you can simply keep them at your residence, and not have any other issues with armory or needing a friend/family to 'buy' them from you.
     
  20. ichiban

    ichiban Member

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    Lots of good advice here. The only thing that I can add is that if you store your guns with family or friends make sure that they are in a safe and make sure the safe is bolted down. Depending on the location, you might want to equip the safe with a dehumidifier as well. Getting them on the homeowners insurance policy would probably be a good idea as well - bad things happen even to good people. Best of luck.
     
  21. ms6852

    ms6852 Member

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    Well I'm retired military and personally would recommend it. It is a great career and at times it may seem idiotic, it is never mundane. Your days will alway be different but the job you do is fulfilling. I never had issues with the guns I owned. Granted I had to register them on post...(in reality you don't) but it is better if you do my guns were alway in my apartment. I did get stopped once for speeding in Fort Campbell Kentucky by the MP's and asked me if I had any firearms. I said yes they checked out the serial #'s and since they were registered they let me go. So from my own personal experience, I have never had problems but I never owned as many as you did. Someone mentioned for you to store them in a storage facility. They now have those that are humidity control. Rent the place and when you finally get a good idea on how military life is and you can rent your own apartment you can alway keep them their with you. Sending them overseas is another issue but when you are stationed there you could always become a member of the Rod and Gun club in which you could learn the local laws and customs. By the way I retired at 39 years get free medical and prescriptions and started my second career immediately afterwards in which I will be eligible to retire again in 5 years at the age of 59 with another pension. Live is good.
     
  22. leadcounsel

    leadcounsel member

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    Been there done that and have the Tshirt -

    I'm in the Army and have a respectable gun collection. I can speak from first hand experience. I'm an officer and guessing you'll pursue that route (that would be my advice, no offense toward enlisting of course).

    First, the military is ODDLY, anti-gun. And generally anti-most of your civilian rights. When you join you are owned. As long as you can be cool with that and play the game you are fine. Because really, most of us (civy or military) answer to someone anyway, right?

    1) You will go through a training phase, likely some sort of Officer Basic Schooling/Course. Probably a career field phase (medical), probably someplace in the Virginia/DC or that metro-area. Then you may go through an infantry basic phase. These courses often change and frankly have been ramped down due to budget cuts and the drawdown in Iraq and pending exit from Afghanistan. Don't know where, but some of it may be in Ft. Benning, GA. Regardless, privately owned weapons are frowned upon on military bases/installations; meaning it's a real hassel, and you should travel with the bare essentials (1 handgun, maybe 1 longgun maximum). There is red tape involved and you'll have to store it in the unit arms room IF you are allowed to bring it at all. Call ahead.

    2) After probably 6 months or so of training you'll be assigned to your first duty station. You may have a chance at some point to elect your top 5 choices. If you are lucky you'll get one of these, but the Army will send you where it needs you (Army needs trump). Other services are the same. Choose these locations wisely. Research the heck out of the areas and bases. It's an important decision and if you were sent to California, for instance, you may not be able to bring certain weapons or hi cap mags. For many people they pick the 'cherry' locations based on weather, sightseeing, etc. But I look at the politics of the location - some are more gun friendly (CCW, purchase laws, etc.).

    After a few years at duty station #1, you will move again. Wash rinse repeat.

    At each location you need to decide whether to buy a home or rent. Merits to both and drawbacks to both. You are able to break leases with no penalty under the ServiceMembers Civil Relief Act with deployment or PCS orders. PM me and I can go into more detail if need be.

    With deployments you have to chose whether to store your stuff or leave it in your house or with family. Again, these are tough choices that we service members make. Storing stuff is a PITA, but often worth it. On the other hand, it's nice to not have to pack and unpack constantly.

    As far as storage and moving - the military will pay a private company to move your stuff and store it until you get to your first duty location. It will move guns, but they aren't very gentle about it. I had some damaged. And they are NOT stored in climate controlled storage. However they are insured. The movers will not move ammo (and a list of other hazmat). I personally moved my most important guns and all my ammo (a real pain). If you store your guns with anyone ensure that you have photos and a receipt. Many guys get BURNED from theft or "breakins" etc. If you store your guns in a pre-paid or month-to-month storage, ensure that it's climate controlled and you pay all in advance. If you accidently fall behind the storage unit can sell your guns at auction! Yup it's true.

    Advice - research each branch because that will make or break your happiness. Hate water. Don't join the Navy. Of the services, the Marines have the best arms training but the Army has the most access to cool schools (I think). The Airforce has the best living conditions. The Marines have the worst living conditions and equipment. Etc.

    I would erase any idea of joining the military just to shoot guns. It is frankly rare that you get an opportunity to shoot cool stuff. Sure it happens, but in my career I've had very few chances to go shoot really fun stuff. The Army generally makes range day miserable and you will hate range day. So don't join just to shoot some full auto.

    I love my career overall, but you must understand that there are very dark days at times, particularly on deployment. It was a good choice and I'll likely stay in a lot longer, but it is the hardest career I could ever imagine having.

    All in all, I've grown a tremendous amount in the Army - I've learned a lot, experienced things I'd never believe I would, and the most important thing is that I am proud of who I've become and the service to the United States in a time of Army conflict. I've served along side great men and women in Iraq many many times. I am RICH with experience.
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2010
  23. Victor1Echo

    Victor1Echo Member

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    What experience are you going to get? If your parents rasied you right the only thing the military will teach you is how to live with a bunch of idiots. Honestly I never knew how stupid people could be until I joined the ARMY. It sucks even worse if you've been to college. Good luck!
     
  24. SSN Vet

    SSN Vet Member

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    I guess my parents were negligent, as they never taught me how to split atoms, drive a ship, navigate, program TLAMs or slip SEALS into enemy ports covertly. :)

    There is a good point burried in there though.... don't enlist on a "whatever the service needs" contract, or guess what? They'll give you a really crappy job that no one else wants. And all of the armed services have an abundance of really crappy jobs that need filling.
     
  25. Sky

    Sky Member

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2010
    Messages:
    2,927
    Location:
    Texas
    What ever branch of service you decide to join you will see, hear, and do things most mortals can only dream of. That's a good thing.

    You can become a wounded vet or crispy critter.... Not a good thing.

    Being an officer is a big plus! Even a Warrant officer. More money.. good thing.

    I look back and some of the greatest moments of deeply understanding myself and mankind came in the military. Having said that the Military in peace time kinda sucks.
    If you are a Medical Doctor/Nurse peace time would be a God sent blessing...I just hope if that is your chosen field you are the best you can be.

    Seems like all the guys who can eat a 3 day old dead cat and walk 10 miles and still fight are some of the first who either voluntarily get out or are RIF (reduction in force) when the fighting stops. Saw many Majors Rif with 16 years service. Which means no retirement. That's not a good thing.

    Military was good to me but I did not get crippled or become a crispy critter. Signed up and got to do exactly what I wanted to do.

    Think I would buy a "safe" cosmo or grease my guns and wrap tightly in wax paper and place at a storage facility for $50 to $75 a month and insure the contents. Have seen guns dug up in jungles with nothing more done to them. No rust clean and fire.
     
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