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new to handguns

Discussion in 'Handguns: General Discussion' started by kingcheese, Nov 15, 2012.

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  1. kingcheese

    kingcheese Member

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    And out of curiosity, what do you guys know about the stoeger cougar? As far as reliability and performance go?
     
  2. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

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    I owned one in .40 S&W. I sold it though, because I didn't like how snappy that cartridge felt. The gun itself was great for the price. It was very accurate, the ergos were great, and I would buy another one in 9mm or .45 in a heartbeat.

    I will admit thought, the finish is not the hardest, and I wasn't real impressed with how it was wearing. But, it was a carry gun, and that will cause the finish to wear faster. For home defense or range use, it is a good value for the price you pay. I'd also recommend it for a lower cost car or boat gun.

    I don't know that I would recommend it as "the last carry gun you'll ever buy" or anything. I just picked up a Springfield XDs for that role. Short mag for city, and longer mag for hiking, or Wal-mart. I also prefer stainless steel for carry. JMO.

    The Stoeger is a good gun though, and if someone told me they were planning to buy one, my response would be "Cool. Those guns are a good value and good shooters." Take it as you like.
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2012
  3. hentown

    hentown Member

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    The Glock is easier to get parts for, and they're inexpensive, and you can install them yourself with no special tools or training. My daughter's first handgun was a G26. She loves it. She had shot my .22lr Woodsman a few times, before I bought her the G26. However, I wouldn't hesitate to recommend a G19 or G26 o anybody as a first handgun.

    About a year ago, I gave some basic firearms instruction to the ex-wife of a well-known major-league baseball player. She's not a really large person, had not fired anything but a .22 pistol when she was a child...nothing since. I started her out with a few mags through my Colt Woodsman. We rapidly moved on to my G17 and G26. She bought a G26 the next week and loves it.
     
  4. budman46

    budman46 Member

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    kingcheese,

    it sounded like you had no handgun experience at all; that's why i recommended a .22.

    you might check springfield's xd(m). lots of gun for the money, 9mm ammo is relatively cheap, rugged and accurate.

    kodiak,
    .22's let you learn you how to shoot for less than $0.04 a round, wolf's steel-case 9mm is $0.20 a shot. after learning to shoot with a .22rf, recoil management is the only thing you need to add.

    personally, i've been reloading for more than 40 years, even casting my own bullets, so i can shoot big nasties for little $$$; i prefer revolvers because the brass doesn't require searching, but i still love my .22s.
     
  5. kingcheese

    kingcheese Member

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    I also reload, Im just new to the cc world
     
  6. Black Knight

    Black Knight Member

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    You are "new" to handguns right? You should go to as many gunshops and ranges as you are able and try every thing they have in stock. You can also check out the guns your friends have. Don't get stuck on just one type or caliber. This will limit you severely. There are many good double action revolvers out there that are quite concealable and more than up to the challenge of protecting and defending its owner. At work I must carry the issued semi-auto pistol but off duty I usually carry a 357 Magnum revolver. Also a 357 Magnum revolver gives you more bang for the buck; it will also chamber and fire the 38 Special safely. Two guns for the price of one. Check them out before you decide they are not for you.
     
  7. budman46

    budman46 Member

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    black knight said lots...

    a small frame .357 gives you a lot of flexibility...from .38 wadcutters to full-house .357's in a concealable package that is simplicity itself.

    one i loved was a taurus 605, ss, 2.5" ss .357.
     
  8. kingcheese

    kingcheese Member

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    Yeah, now I'm looking at a micro eagle(380acp) a g26, a cougar(stoeger make), and a mini 22mag revolver, all of witch where heavily recomended by,the owners of the 4 shops i hit up, but the mini revolver is what I'm going to look hard at, after asking about them and 3 guys pulled there's out and set them on the counter at the shop, it speaks volumes to me
     
  9. 460Shooter

    460Shooter Member

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    A ruger SP-101 or a Smith J frame is are always good options too. .357 is a great all around carry cartridge. .327 could be fun too.

    You know, I don't like to sound like a groupie, but I just picked up a Springfield XDs and I have shot it. As far as balancing ease of concealment, carry ability, and fire power, it is better than anything else I've seen in .45 acp. If you prefer 9mm, the S&W Shield is supposed to be great too.

    I've been carrying for about 5 years, and I've come to realize just how important carry comfort is. Having the right gun for that job is essential. If you haven't looked at those two options, I'd highly recommend that you do and give them some consideration.

    I hope your narrowing things down a bit.

    I always say start with purpose, then mechanics, and then form. What do I need this for? What type do I want to perform that task? What brand and build type do I prefer.

    Need, Want , Preference is a good order for narrowing things down.
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2012
  10. baghdaddy202003

    baghdaddy202003 Member

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    I prefer the XD 9mm myself. I think the grip angle is more in line with other popular platforms (this makes it easier to shoot many pistols with little difference felt). I think the gun operates flawlessly and is very reliable. Some would steer you to the Glock, which is fine. I dont like the grip angle on it at all! It does make it easier for a newbie to pick it up and get on target easy. The aggressiveness of the angle makes you push and pull which helps with recoil. But when you pick up another pistol and fire it you will shoot low every time.
     
  11. golden

    golden Member

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    My experience with the guns you mentioned

    Cheese,

    I have owned and shot some of the guns you mentioned.

    1. The KAHR CW9 was a very well made gun, but the light weight and slim grip made it something I had never experienced before. A 9m.m. that kicked too hard. It was accurate and reliable, but I found it so unpleasant to shoot, I sold it.

    2. The BERETTA Cougar, now made by STOEGER (which is owned by BERETTA) was a good shooter and very reliable. My only complaint was that the police trade in gun I bought had a worn out magazine and the the grip was to long. The grip is more like the BROWNING Hi Power, than the BERETTA 92. It also holds 15 rounds. I thought that the more compact L model made more sense, as it was easier to conceal, yet still held 13 rounds. Now STOEGER has re introduced an L model in 9m.m. A shooting buddy who really likes the Cougar design has one in .40 S&W and another in .45ACP. He love them and will be picking up a 9m.m. L model when he finds one.

    3. The SIG 226 is what I carried for about a year when I worked for the I&NS. It shot better than my GLOCK 19, but was noticeably heavier. The 226 is accurate, super reliable and very well made, but the grip is a bit chunky like most double stack guns.
    I fell in love with the old SIG 225 because it has a single stack magazine that held only 8 rounds, but fit my hand perfectly. It has proven to be one of the most accurate handguns I own.
    My wife liked it so much, she took it as her house gun. One word of warning on the SIG 225, older, police trade in models often will not feed hollow point ammo. I got around this by using COR BON Powerball for carry and full metal jacket ammo for practice.

    4. Another gun that I bought and has been a complete winner for me is the WALTHER P99 AS. This is the P99 with the traditional double/single action trigger. I have also shot the P99 QA with the GLOCK like trigger and did not like it nearly as much.
    The strong points are accuracy, fantastic double action trigger with a SIG like transition to single action after the first shot. The trigger is so good, I would be happy with a double action only version.
    The WALTHER was the first pistol to offer interchangeable back straps on the grip. I found the medium size fit me so well, it made my GLOCK 19 feel club like and I really liked the GLOCK.

    5. I have also owned and shot the SPRINGFIELD ARMORY XD. It is a fine pistol that has earned an excellent reputation. I have found it to be easy to shoot, reliable and accurate. If you like the GLOCK style of trigger, it offers a better shaped grip and the advantage of a grip safety that makes it even safer than a GLOCK. It also comes with some useful accessories in the box.

    Just my experiences,

    Jim
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2012
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