New Western rig

bangswitch

Member
Joined
Aug 17, 2014
Messages
1,963
Location
western NC
After waiting 6 weeks to have it made, I got a double rig from Texas Gunslinger Co. I wanted something on the plain side, I might do some tooling myself and add a concho to the holster middle strap, but I'm happy with them as-is. The workmanship is excellent and the leather is first-rate. The setup is kind of stiff right now, but I'm going to treat the leather and try to soften it up and mold the holsters to the guns better. I wanted something a horseman would wear, rather than a gunslinger rig. The right side holster is for my 5-1/2" Uberti 1873 Colt clone, the cross-draw is for my 7-1/2" Taylor's Remington 1875 clone. I chose the cross-draw for the longer barrel, makes it easier to draw. The gun belt has 24 loops in back for cartridges. Both guns are chambered for .45 Colt. I've been thinking about joining SASS or a similar single action group and playing cowboy in my reclining years. Not interested in serious competition, but it looks like a lot of fun.
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Gun leather is supposed to be stiff. You don't want it to get soft. That's a nice rig even if it isn't historically correct.
What's not correct? Not that it matters, really. It does what I want, but would be interested in how you tell historical accuracy. Is it the method of manufacture, or the hardware used, etc?

I want to make it a bit more supple and conform better to the revolvers, not to really soften it up. I'm not concerned with it getting beat up or "dented", it's a utilitarian holster. There were instructions that came with it about oiling it and flaring the top edge a bit and I'd like to make the belt form to me a little, rather than it feeling like a metal band. What leather treatments would you recommend? The maker did not recommend neatsfoot oil as it would darken the leather too much (not an issue with me) and could degrade the stitching (weaken it over time), which would be an issue.
 
What's not correct? Not that it matters, really. It does what I want, but would be interested in how you tell historical accuracy. Is it the method of manufacture, or the hardware used, etc?

I want to make it a bit more supple and conform better to the revolvers, not to really soften it up. I'm not concerned with it getting beat up or "dented", it's a utilitarian holster. There were instructions that came with it about oiling it and flaring the top edge a bit and I'd like to make the belt form to me a little, rather than it feeling like a metal band. What leather treatments would you recommend? The maker did not recommend neatsfoot oil as it would darken the leather too much (not an issue with me) and could degrade the stitching (weaken it over time), which would be an issue.

Supple is softening. It can make the leather stretch. Original holsters covered all of the cylinder and hammer except sometimes the tip of the hammer was exposed. Hammer thongs weren't used. The holsters held the gun tight enough to keep the gun from falling out and usually took two hands to pull a gun. One to hold the holster down and the other to pull the gun. Leg ties weren't used either. Anything you use for treatment is going to darken it some. I use saddle soap. You can wet mold it by dipping it in water and wrapping the gun in plastic wrap and putting it in the holster and working the leather around until it's formed to the gun and letting it dry. This is the rig I used in SASS. It's a direct copy of an 1880's double loop except for the hammer thongs.

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Just make sure to keep the suede clean otherwise it is terrible for gun finish. The suede will catch and hold onto dirt and other grit creating almost a sandpaper effect over time. A smooth liner is alot better on finish cause it's easier to just wipe down occasionally.

Pigskin is best.
 
Supple is softening. It can make the leather stretch. Original holsters covered all of the cylinder and hammer except sometimes the tip of the hammer was exposed.
I undercut the holsters about half an inch today where the trigger guard contacts them. It allowed the gun to sit deeper in the holster and cover the cylinder and a little of the loading gate, but the trigger is still exposed. I like the deeper fit. I may re-do the border stitch where I did the undercut, but it would only be for looks, as it doesn't do anything else.
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Nice looking rig. I would do nothing to the leather. It will form to fit you with use just like leather boots and shoes do, Called breaking in and it will retain it's shape. Soft and supple doesn't do that. I guess if you have no dust suede leather will be OK. If you do it will catch and hold it and act like sandpaper. We have plenty of dust in this area and one suede lined holster was enough to wean me away from them.
 
Supple is softening. It can make the leather stretch. Original holsters covered all of the cylinder and hammer except sometimes the tip of the hammer was exposed. Hammer thongs weren't used. The holsters held the gun tight enough to keep the gun from falling out and usually took two hands to pull a gun. One to hold the holster down and the other to pull the gun. Leg ties weren't used either. Anything you use for treatment is going to darken it some. I use saddle soap. You can wet mold it by dipping it in water and wrapping the gun in plastic wrap and putting it in the holster and working the leather around until it's formed to the gun and letting it dry. This is the rig I used in SASS. It's a direct copy of an 1880's double loop except for the hammer thongs.

WGseGLsl.jpg
The holsters in the pic have the kind of coverage (of the actual gun) I prefer.

I'm kind of in the market for another cross draw holster with that kind of coverage and a closed bottom.

It gets damned dusty where I ride.
 
Came across an old box of gun stuff in a storage cabinet that I though I'd lost.

Included in it was my Bianchi 1898 "Gun Fighter" rig for the 6-1/2" Ruger Blackhawk .357 Magnum.

Felt like Marty McFly.

Not my photo

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