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Not again.......! Feral Hog Control in East Texas

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by Flintknapper, May 13, 2009.

  1. Terry Vincent

    Terry Vincent Member

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    image.jpeg Thought I'd use this as a demonstration of what the bullet is up against on a 250 lb boar. The shoulder area is covered with this subcutaneous, nearly inflexible sheath. The heavy bullets utilized in big bore rifles have no difficulty penetrating this protective covering on both sides of the boar! The sheathing is also responsible for a lack of blood trail unless there is a substantial hole provided by the bullet.

    I offer this as information for new hunters contemplating using light speedy, frangible bullets. Please remember there is approximately two or more inches of muscle and ribs to defeat before the bullet gets to the heart/lungs on a broadside shot.
     
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  2. Flintknapper

    Flintknapper Member

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    ^^^^^ While a thick shield is not necessarily present on every Boar you encounter, it certainly 'can' be.

    As noted in the post right above this one, you might very well need to penetrate 2-3" (or more) of hide, shield, muscle and bone...BEFORE you get to the goodies. And that assumes a 'broadside' shot.

    I've also shot hogs (of either sex) that were caked in dried mud. Their hair a matted mess.

    Even so....just about any well constructed bullet will penetrate all of this, but it is still something to think about.

    I've always suggested a person use a 'heavy for caliber' bullet of rugged construction when going after hogs. Because you just never know what you will be presented with. It could be anything from a slick, shiny 90 lb. Sow to a 300 lb. Boar caked in mud with a 3" shield.
     

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  3. Ole Joe Clark

    Ole Joe Clark Member

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    Glad to see activity on this thread. One of the main reasons I check this forum every day.

    Good hunting.

    Have a blessed day,

    Leon
     
  4. Terry Vincent

    Terry Vincent Member

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    Flintnapper as usual is correct in his advice. Be prepared for the worst possible shot presentation and condition, not just the best ones. What caliber you choose to hunt hogs will drive your success ratio, and this includes the heavy for caliber bullet of thick jacket construction which offers the most penetration for whatever cartridge you choose to hunt with.

    Forest Gump's mother's advice about chocolate and life can be just as applicable about hunting hogs......... You never know what you will get.
     
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  5. Flintknapper

    Flintknapper Member

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    So....I decided I would take advantage of the nice, cool weather we were having here yesterday and go sit on a stand for awhile.

    I went to the bait site about 2 p.m. and hand broadcast some corn. This bait site has elevated stands set at 40 & 100 yds from the corn. I intended to sit on the 40 yd. stand because I wanted to try and get a couple of hogs 'in line' and hopefully take two with one shot. I try to be efficient...when I can. ;)

    The hogs have been coming in around 7 P.M. so I thought if I got on stand by 6 O'Clock that would be early enough and I wouldn't have to contend with so many mosquitoes. Sundown is about 7:30 p.m. and by 8 O'Clock its pretty much pitch black down there.

    So that was my 'plan' all calculated and figured out.....right? Just saunter down there, sit for an hour and enjoy myself. Watch the birds and squirrels and whatever else might come along....until the hogs get there.

    Left the house and drove down the pasture...stopping a few hundred yards short of my hunting spot. Walked to my stand, left my rifle there and went to go hook up the battery to the hog light....just in case they came in later. And that is where my 'plan' started to fall apart. I could see where a squirrel (or something) had chewed completely through one of the wires leading up to the light and it was too far up the tree for me to reach it to repair it.

    O.K. not ideal...but nothing to fret over. I have a light on my rifle and the pigs would probably come in before dark anyway. A took a quick glance at the feed site and my heart sank. ALL the corn was GONE. Except for some that I threw into the mud-hole it was ALL gone. The hogs had already been there and left. O.K. well..... THIS is not good.

    Well...what the heck, I'm already here and there is some chance that the hogs will come back before dark. So I get in my stand.... and the wind that previously was angling toward me is now swirling. Then it changes directions altogether....and starts blowing from my back toward the bait site! Come on....!

    At that point...I was thinking 'I might as well get down', this just isn't going to work. Then I thought about it a little more and decided to chance it. Since it was the second day after the front had blown through...as soon as the sun would set the wind would probably settle some. Then IF the hogs would come in from my left I might still get a shot off before they caught my scent. Not too much to ask....right?

    Right at sunset the wind began to settle and I heard a few twigs snapping in the distance off to my left but also from BEHIND me. What the heck? I stayed perfectly still and quiet and listened closely.

    Sure enough....something was approaching from an angle (to my left and behind me). Surely...this was not the pigs. They would had to have been out in the pasture to be coming from this direction.

    Soon I heard the sound of mud 'sucking' at hooves/paws/feet ? And then the first hog appeared, sloshing it's way though the muddiest part of the whole area. They NEVER come from that direction.

    They were no more than 25 yds. to my left when they went by my stand. How they didn't smell me I will never know. I just waited and let them come on in. They went directly to the 'mud hole' and starting rooting around in it for any left over kernels of corn.

    I got my rifle up and frantically started looking for any two to get close together. I knew they would not be there for long. They were either going to smell me and run....or give up on the corn and leave in short order. Finally...one hog came up behind another but was facing it (creating a 'T'). This looked to be as good as it was going to get.

    I would have to hold really high on the back of the first pig in order to hit the second one in the head or neck. So be it.

    At the shot....both pigs went down, but the one in the front got right back up and ran 'humped up' about 30 yds., went under the fence line and barely made it to the creek where it expired.

    So...in the end when the bad and good luck were weighed...the 'good luck' (AKA dumb luck) tipped in my favor and we were able to get two more pigs out of the population.

    Game camera just happened to get most of it. Had to edit the video (lighten it) so you can see it. It was actually MUCH darker in real life.


     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2018
  6. Keyfer 55

    Keyfer 55 Member

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    Those hogs like chicken compost!!
     
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  7. Flintknapper

    Flintknapper Member

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    Hogs like everything. If it contains at least one calorie and they can get their mouth around it, they'll eat it.
     
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  8. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    I saw old spotty tonight. He was very cautious coming out of the woods. I could see him with my 10 power binocs, but it was almost dark, just enough light to tell he was ol' spotty by his outline. I didn't use the light, should have. Thought I could place the shot without it, but the target was very faint in the dim light. Thought I'd heard him drop, but then I guess he was running off 'cause I took the dog out there and she didn't find him. I found no blood at all, so I guess I blew it. Shoulda kicked on the friggin' light, but I still don't trust they can't see it and he was real careful coming out of the woods. Shoulda, woulda, coulda.....DANG IT ALL!
     
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  9. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    Well, I didn't miss him, just didn't find him, and he was in plain sight!!!!! He was laying in the sendero on the neighbor's place not 20 yards from where I shot him. My feeder is along the fence line. He's probably 250-300 lbs, might have been a little rank, anyway. He's feeding the buzzards back there. RIP Ol' Spotty. Your memory is seared into my brain. gr_grin.gif He was a wiley old pig, a worthy adversary. I'd have butchered him if I'd thought to have just GLANCED with a flashlight over in that sendero on the other side of the fence. Oh, well, a good pig is a dead pig. It was a rather dark night last night.

    I hit him low in the shoulder through the heart right where I'd intended and my 154 SP opened up a big exit wound, yet no blood that I could find by flashlight. Bummer. At least now I'm not questioning my marksmanship. :D Neighbors will be happy. They've been begging me to take ol' spotty out. :D He's done damage in their 17 acre patch of woods.
     
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  10. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    Ol' Spotty lies in repose on the Rollin' G Ranchette. He lived a good, long life tearing up every inch of dirt he came across and eating all the corn he could. He's now admired by flocks of buzzard fans. You were a good adversary, ol' boy, RIP and may one of your youngsters come to my feeder some evening. gr_grin.gif

    46-albums51-picture409353.jpg
     
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  11. BigBore44

    BigBore44 Member

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    I’ve said this many times. I hunt with a 444 or 45-70 and I’ve mad many pigs not bleed a drop that I could spot. And I’m good at finding blood. Luckily I’ve never lost one because they usually just drop. That’s why I tell my buddies that go after them with AR’s in .223/5.56 to shoot them in the neck or ear.
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2018
  12. Double Naught Spy

    Double Naught Spy Sus Venator

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    And they need to understand that shooting "behind the ear" isn't a good location and that when shooting into the neck, they really should be trying to hit the spine for a CNS shot or being shooting with a hog quartered such that the bullet enters the neck and then hits the head. There is a lot of room for error with the vague "neck" description.

    Here is where I shot my 2nd hog that had a partially healed "behind the ear" shot through the neck. Skip to 2:45 in the video for the example.

     
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  13. Flintknapper

    Flintknapper Member

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    And this little piggy did NOT go 'Wee-Wee-Wee' all the way home.

    I was sitting at the computer this evening a bit after sundown. Looking up some information, when I heard my wife ask 'is that a group of hogs at the end of the pasture'?

    I got up and looked out the window...and sure enough there were six hogs rooting up the pasture about 275 yds. out.

    I went and grabbed the 7mm-08, told my wife to not the let the Dachshunds go to the door leading to the back porch.

    I stepped out on the porch cranked the scope back down to 10 power (wouldn't need 15 for this), lit up the reticle and started surveying the group. All looked to be about the same size...so I just settled in on the one most in the open.

    I had no sooner pushed the safety off...when I heard one of our dogs barking at the top of its lungs from somewhere in the living room.

    'Maddie' the oldest Dachshund had jumped up in the rocking chair to look out the window and see what I was doing. Well...she spotted the hogs out in HER pasture and was not happy about that.

    The hogs of course heard the barking...even through double paned windows and being more than 250 yds. distant.

    It alarmed them just enough to start them moving toward the tree line. I took a walking shot on a sow that was moving the slowest, but still hit her about 4"-5" behind the shoulder. I think I had my lead right...but just pulled the shot (rifle kinda rested on the porch rail).

    Anyway, I could tell by the way the hog was running it wasn't going to go far...and in fact it crumpled just 20 yds. later.

    Hogs are getting pretty bold when they start coming up around the house. Coyotes know better.
     

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  14. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    Heck, man, I shot one not long ago in the back yard not 40 yards from my porch! But, it's thick woods here, no place to SEE over 100 yards except down the road out front. I think I mentioned that one further back in this thread, so I won't rehash it. :D
     
  15. Flintknapper

    Flintknapper Member

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    Yes, I seem to remember that you had 'moved' recently (in the last couple of years?) and that your new property and surrounding properties were pretty thick. I am right in the middle of the 'Piney Woods' so except for pasture land, power-lines or pipelines....you can't see very far.

    Keep after them. You and I will never put much of a dent in them, but we have to do what we can...right?
     
  16. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    Well, it gives me year around fun....and pork when I actually FIND 'em. LOL
     
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  17. 3Crows

    3Crows Member

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    I am all for shooting them and eating them but I wonder if they really multiply this fast or are they being released into the wild to be hunted?
     
  18. Blue68f100

    Blue68f100 Member

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    Yes to multiplying that fast. My neighbor had trapped some young sows, ~75 lbs. When he butchered them each one was carrying 2 piglets. These were not even a year old and starting to breed.
     
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  19. Flintknapper

    Flintknapper Member

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    Yes and Yes depending upon the State and current population.

    In Texas and other States with well established populations....the reproduction rate of the hogs is something that has proven unmanageable in terms of control.

    In other States (pretty much anything North of Oklahoma) the population increase (and spread) is most certainly due to folks bringing them in illegally and releasing them.

    I live in Deep East Texas which has had a population of wild/feral hogs since before the 1700's. BUT they were not large in number nor widely spread. In my area....we used to have what were called (colloquially) 'Pineywoods Rooters'.

    Typically, they were solid black, had long hair and a notably longer snout than the feral pigs we see today. Additionally, most had a distinctly different disposition than the pigs I see here now. Didn't matter whether it was a Boar or a Sow....about 50% of them required YOU to move/give way the others would leave first of their own accord. Unfortunately...their willingness to 'stand their ground' resulted in their demise.

    Pretty much everything I encounter now will beat a retreat at the first sign of danger.

    But what happened here (peaking in the mid 80's to early 90's) was 'Hog Doggers' would catch and release the hogs into different areas. Some would even raise pigs and release them into the wild so they would have something to run their dogs on.

    After those hogs became established....populations exploded and hunters (but NOT landowners) were thrilled to have something new to hunt. So...a somewhat 'tolerant' attitude allowed the hogs to spread further. To me they are a scourge, but some folks want them. In any case, they are here to stay now. Not unlike fire-ants.
     
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  20. Tinybob

    Tinybob Member

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    The only difference, it's hard to eat fire ants.;)
     
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  21. Flintknapper

    Flintknapper Member

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    They're just not very 'filling'.
     
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  22. 3Crows

    3Crows Member

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    Yes, from north Louisiana, piney woods. Familiar with the woods hogs of the region. Not native but had been much longer feral and much more devolved. And though tough, typically not as large as the "farm" animals I see about now and they were/are very aggresive.

    The fat shield on that one up post is impressive. It will not stop a 30-30 with a tough 170 grain bullet but if one feels better about it then a CLFP 405 grain from a Marlin 45-70 will lay him down fer ya. A .270, .308, 30-06 will put the smack on them hard too.

    Yeah, I think that some of these animals are farm animals released as free runners for sport. The damage they are doing in doing so is past what is gained for sport hunting them.

    But I am all in for hunting them feral pigs and hogs and feral cats while about it.

    We used to sit out in grade school under the pine trees for class, the school building was too hot. I recall my first encounter, a young lady was sitting all pretty listening to the teacher and suddenly she started screaming, covered with red ants. That was the end of that. Between feral cats and red ants the ground nesting birds and animals have taken a severe hit across their range.

    3C
     
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  23. alsaqr

    alsaqr Member

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    Until recently rednecks were releasing hogs in southern OK. The transport of wild hogs was largely unregulated. Additionally, Bubba was buying up hogs at stock sales and releasing them into the wild. Many of the hogs i killed in South central OK looked like dirty show pigs. Then the OK Dep't of Agriculture came up with a plan.

    The source of many wild hogs were the so called hog hunting ranches.

    1. A $25 license is required to hunt hogs at the ranches.
    2. A license is required for the transport of wild hogs.
    3. Transport of wild hogs now requires a permit valid for 24 hours. The request for the transport permit must include departure point, number of hogs transported and destination.
     
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  24. Tinybob

    Tinybob Member

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    If I'm remembering correctly the AGFC made it illegal to transport wild hogs in Arkansas a few years back, not even with a permit. I don't know for sure if that helped with the spread of them or not, but it couldn't have hurt.
     
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  25. alsaqr

    alsaqr Member

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    The OK Dep't of Agriculture did something else too. No new hog hunting ranches will be licensed.
     
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