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Pietta SAA, Black Powder version

Discussion in 'Blackpowder' started by Jason313, Jul 8, 2018.

  1. Jason313

    Jason313 Member

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    I have a question, what are the dimensions of the cylinder in the SAA BP, specifically, how deep are the chambers compared to a 1858 NMA? I ask because in the pics ive looked at, it appears to be a shorter cylinder than the 1858, but could simply be that it is thicker in the SAA and gives that appearance. I just want to know if the chamber depth is going to be equal or close to, my 1858? If nobody on here is personally familiar with the SAA BP, i imagine the dimensions of the cylinder are pretty close to the SAA cartridge models, on the outside at least, so that would give me an idea of it also. I want the gun, cant own a firearm (picked up a drug possession charge 25 years ago) so this SAA is the closest i can get, but i dont want to compromise on power so if the chambers hold less charge (by too much) then i might have to think about it a bit more. Thanks in advance, you guys on here are great and have been a big help to this Noob (who has fallen in love with BP).
     

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  2. AlexanderA
    • Contributing Member

    AlexanderA Member

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    Yes, the chamber depth of a cap-and-ball SAA is shorter than that of a Remington '58. That's because a good bit of the length of what would have been the cartridge has to be used for the nipples and the nipple seats. On the other hand, the Rem '58 has plenty of room even for a cartridge conversion cylinder.

    If you are comparing strictly cap-and-ball designs, the Rem '58 is more practical than a retroconverted SAA. For one thing, the '58 has a usable loading lever. The ejector rod on a SAA is not a loading lever.
     
  3. paul harm

    paul harm Member

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    If you're a felon it's against the law to own a C&B revolver converted to handle cartridges be they BP or smokeless. I would suggest you go back to court and with a clean record for 25 years try and get your record cleared, not find a way to get around the present laws.
     
    milemaker13, GRIZ22 and red rick like this.
  4. 45 Dragoon

    45 Dragoon Member

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    Don't think he mentioned shooting cartridges. He even put a picture of the S.A. revolver he is posting about in his post. It's a cap an ball revolver.

    Mike
     
  5. drobs

    drobs Member

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    Blackpowdershooter 44 has a nice review of the Pietta 1873 BP revolver:

     
  6. AlexanderA
    • Contributing Member

    AlexanderA Member

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    As the video points out, this gun must be loaded with the cylinder out of the weapon, due to the lack of a loading lever. That alone would be a deal breaker if you want a gun for practical shooting.

    Also, directly addressing the OP's question, the video shows that loading a full 30 gr. of powder in a chamber can be problematic. Indeed, the chambers are considerably shorter than those of a '58 Remington.
     
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  7. drobs

    drobs Member

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    Uberti also makes one of these 1873 C&B revolvers. Not sure about chamber capacities on it though.

    I have a real nice shooting Uberti 1873 Hombre in 357mag. I've read that Uberti 1873's are a little nicer than Pietta 1873 revolvers. I prefer Pietta for cap and ball revolvers.

    I agree with Alexander, I like being able to load black powder on the gun. Having to use a loading stand is a negative to me.
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2018
  8. paul harm

    paul harm Member

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    Dragoon, I don't see in the picture a loading lever or nipples, so I'm just going to assume it's a cartridge gun. But then I just went to Taylors' web site and found the 1873 BP revolver. What a brain storm, make a C&B revolver to look like a cartridge gun with a special hammer and without a loading lever. They must sell a ton of these. Guess I'll never understand how some people think. I mean, I can load any C&B revolver with a loading stand. I sure don't need one that was made where that's the only way to load it. Not with standing the stubbies some of you guys make for yourself. Jason, why are you worried about power if the only reason you could use the gun for is paper punching ? And, is there a good reason you want a gun that looks like a modern cartridge gun ? Most of us shooting BP do it because we like doing things the way they were done a 150 or 200 years ago and want our firearms reflecting this. Just a couple of thoughts.
     
  9. 45 Dragoon

    45 Dragoon Member

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    I'm pretty sure the revolver was made in response to the wants from the European crowd (to have a revolver that looks like the most famous six-gun in the world!). Naturally, some shooters/collectors in the States would want one as well so they are offered here.

    BTW, I doesn't appear that he's trying to "get around present laws" (your first assumption). He's asking questions about a cap and ball revolver and I'm pretty sure he's aware of his situation. That being the case, the " power" element might be a concern if this particular revolver was the only available instrument in case of a self defense situation.

    Mike
     
  10. Mizar

    Mizar Member

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    Exactly! In most European countries owning a replica percussion revolver requires less paperwork compared to cartridge weapons, or none at all. And that revolver, although a fantasy gun, is considered "replica" by the laws.
     
  11. paul harm

    paul harm Member

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    Whether BP or modern, I don't believe he can use it for self defense. I'm not sure, but the minute it's used for just about anything, a felon is breaking the law. A good friend who's run a BP gun store for 45 years had a fellow wanting to buy a BP revolver and ask about the cartridge conversion for it. When he found out the man was a felon he was told not to come into the store or try to buy a gun. Now each state could have different laws and what's legal in one may not be in another. Now if someone is buying a gun, any gun, and the intention is to use it so you could shoot someone else even in self defense, then I don't know for sure, but I'd have to think that would be against the law if you're a felon. Just my feelings.
     
    milemaker13 likes this.
  12. 45 Dragoon

    45 Dragoon Member

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    I figured it was"feelings".


    Mike
     
  13. Eyrie G. Dogg

    Eyrie G. Dogg Member

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    I ordered one of those faux SSA’s from Cabellas way back in the mid ‘90’s for two bills. As often happened in those days with Cabellas it arrived pretty beat up with major milling marks and the action did not function properly. It handled well but within an hour I was over that particular mod and sent it back and got one more 1860 instead and never regretted the decision.

    Possession would be the offence, use may be another matter entirely. I know, how do you use it without possessing it, but ...

    Self preservation being the first law of nature and all - if a felon suddenly put themselves in possession of a firearm under exigent circumstance to legitimately protect themselves or others they would have the defense of necessity available. That would require some sort of emergency though and would only be good for the duration of the threat. Prosecutors know this and so no DA is going to charge our previously convicted felon for possession because of him reasonably resisting getting killed or seriously hurt. If they did charge a possession violation the defendant could/would assert the defense and any rational jury would acquit. Sometimes the law is an ass - but not always.
     
    expat_alaska likes this.
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