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Portable oxygen?

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by Gary O, Aug 21, 2014.

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  1. Gary O

    Gary O Member

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    Do any of you folks take along a small oxygen bottle while hunting at high altitude? As I get older I feel the effects of altitude sickness more and more...thanks.
     
  2. Patocazador

    Patocazador Member

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    Depending on the altitude, a small bottle won't last long.
    Most people don't have trouble below 10,000' as far as altitude sickness goes but you have to get acclimated to that height. Several days at a lower altitude is usually enough. You will still get tired faster and 'winded' easily but the headaches, etc. should be under control.

    Ask your MD about Diamox (acetazolamide). http://www.traveldoctor.co.uk/altitude.htm
     
  3. jmorris

    jmorris Member

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    My Dad uses Boost canned oxygen sometimes when we visit my sister but it is not a long term fix. Do you know how high you can go and still feel ok?

    My wife for example is fine at 7000 ft +\- but doesn't do well at all at 14,000 even just sitting there.

    People are different and only you will know what you can stand. Might start out hunting as low as you can and move up from there.

    Also remember the hunt will be much less taxing on your body than packing out the animal. Don't "bite off" more than you can chew.
     
  4. longknife12

    longknife12 Member

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    Pace yourself and double the water.A little Tylenol and try to come up a couple of days early. Don't kid yourself, we that live here have to adjust!
    Dan
    ;)
     
  5. gamestalker

    gamestalker member

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    You know, now that I am no longer a spring chicken, I considered doing that this last spring, as I knew I was going to be hunting at elevations between 9,000' and 10,500'. But then I considered that I have been hunting at such elevations for quite a number of years, and rarely experienced much, if any difficulty. But my thoughts on this are that, if you know you have issues with altitude sickness, then yes, at least have a small tank with you, and maybe some medicine, just in case it gets to be an issue.

    Even moderate elevations of 9 or 10 thousand feet can have serious consequences for some folks, so make sure you are in good physical condition. And if it is at all possible, make a dry run, in other words if it's feasible take a trip to the high country and hike a couple slopes and see how you feel. That's in fact what I did prior to my spring hunt this year.

    GS
     
  6. jmr40

    jmr40 Member

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    Unless you have someone to carry it for you, you'd probably expend more oxygen carrying the extra weight than it would provide for you. I could see a small tank kept in camp for emergencies.
     
  7. Art Eatman

    Art Eatman Administrator Staff Member

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    They don't give them away, and a doc's prescription is needed, but "Life Choice" has a portable five-pound generator that works off a car's cigar lighter. On high production, its battery is good for an hour's steady use. I rarely use mine, having it mostly for "In case of in case." I didn't worry about such things when I was a young lad of only sixty. :D

    Maybe an albuterol "puffer" would help even healthy lungs for someone who's working way above their normal elevation above sea level. Dunno.
     
  8. Coyote3855

    Coyote3855 Member

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  9. bwhntr53

    bwhntr53 Member

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    Patocazador stated:

    "Depending on the altitude, a small bottle won't last long.
    Most people don't have trouble below 10,000' as far as altitude sickness goes but you have to get acclimated to that height. Several days at a lower altitude is usually enough. You will still get tired faster and 'winded' easily but the headaches, etc. should be under control.

    Ask your MD about Diamox (acetazolamide). http://www.traveldoctor.co.uk/altitude.htm
    __________________
    Life's short, have some fun.

    Bob"

    Since I am planning on hunting in Colorado, this September, I went to my Doctor and he prescribed the Acetazolamide ER for me. Prescription only. As I will be hunting from 9,000 to 11,000 feet in elevation. I will see how it helps out.
     
  10. WALKERs210

    WALKERs210 Member

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    One of my tanks that is not the smallest but still weights in around 5 lbs. My regulator is one that allows the flow rate to be adjusted from 1 liter up to 6 liters. With it set at 2liters it will last me for about 3-3 1/2 hours with no real physical excursion. The one that operated from a 12volt source and by battery might be more in line of what you need. The tank needs to be in a back pack to let the body carry the weight in a more even distribution. Best way to go is talk to your respiratory doctor and explain what your plans are. At least with my doctor he is much more concerned with what I want/need than him playing the "GOD' card.
     
  11. Kynoch

    Kynoch member

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    Make sure you're aware of the potential side effects. Nothing substitutes taking sufficient time to acclimate, good hydration and good physical conditioning.
     
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