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Primer qeustion for 30-06

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by bchris2146, Sep 22, 2009.

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  1. bchris2146

    bchris2146 Member

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    I'm shooting a basic model 700 30-06 with 165 gr SSTs. Does anyone know if the primer (magnum or standard rifle) makes any difference in performance? Will it affect accuracy? The reason I'm asking is that I have some magnum primers I could be using.
     
  2. Roadkill

    Roadkill Member

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    I use magnum primers in both 30-06 and .308. With both guns I down load the powder 2 grains to compensate for the hotter primer ignition. The 30-06 is for a few bolt actions and a Garand, the .308 is for a M1A. There is a definite reaction in the semi autos even with the reduced load. The gas systems work better (to me anyway). In bolt actions I don't notice a difference. Accuracy is the same, I started using them when I ran low on standard primers.
     
  3. Remo-99

    Remo-99 Member

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    If your at or near a max loading just drop the charge back down and do a re-workup of the load.
    And like Roadkill I've also had the need to use mag primers with non ball powders in 308win(due to running out of standard primers), without any detectable differences in accuracy, between them.
     
  4. Grumulkin

    Grumulkin Member

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    I've frequently used magnum primers in cartridges of various sizes to get better accuracy. What I've found is:

    1. In cartridges the size of 308 Winchester and larger, there is no need to adjust powder charge when going from large rifle to large rifle magnum primers with one exception. Remington primers seem a little cooler so, if the load was originally worked up with Remington primers, back off a little. I've never used Wolf primers so can't comment about them. The ones I've used are Federal, CCI, Remington and Winchester.

    2. Many times there is no difference in accuracy, accuracy may be worse or accuracy may be better. I've found no way to predict results before hand; you just have to try it and see.
     
  5. Ben Shepherd

    Ben Shepherd Member

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    The BIG key here-

    What powder are you using? The slug won't care much which primer you use, but the powder sure will.
     
  6. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    I agree, knowing that would help...
     
  7. Beelzy

    Beelzy Member

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    Magnum primers are desired for those calibers in loads that will be used in extreme cold environments.

    Otherwise regular primers are just fine.
     
  8. Ben Shepherd

    Ben Shepherd Member

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    Most times that works if you back the charge off a touch. But a bigger tell is whether you are using a stick or ball powder. Standard with the former, magnum with the latter. This is just a generalization, and a current manual(or 3) should be consulted prior to loading ANY primer/powder combination.
     
  9. Bart B.

    Bart B. Member

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    Milder primers typically produce the best accuracy. But any primer usually gets the bullet out of the barrel.

    Years ago a friend reamed out primer pockets in .17 Rem. cases to use large primers, then shot primed cases (no powder) loaded with BB's shooting them in a 10 inch barrel through a chronograph. Primers producing the lowest velocity gave best accuracy in normal rifle loads.
     
  10. RTC

    RTC Member

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    What primer to use?

    My rule of thumb is 50 grains or more of 4350 or a slower powder gets a magnum primer. Any ball powder in just about every caliber gets a magnum primer. Magnum type loads in magnum handgun calibers get a magnum primer. Lighter loads in those same handgun calibers get a standard primer. 9mm's and 45's get standard. To get to the 50 grain level in rifle loads, you almost have to be using the 30-06 case family (6mm-06, 25-06, 270, 280, 30-06, 35 Whelen, etc.) or larger case.
     
  11. Ben Shepherd

    Ben Shepherd Member

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    Bchris2146-

    I reccomend you try somewhere between 55-57 grains of H4350 under that 165 Hornady SST(start at the low end and work up) Many members here on THR have had good results with a load in this range.

    I use standard primers with this powder and have had excellent results in doing so, but I have yet to test this primer/powder combo below 10 degrees F, down to that point however, no sign of squibs.
     
  12. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    Yep.

    As posted, what powder?
     
  13. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    When loading a 165/168gr bullet for the 30-06 I have gotten very good results with 57.0gr-58.0gr H4350 using a standard primer. (usually a Winchester of CCI large rifle primer)
     
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