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Pros and Cons?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by Leafy Cronmer, Mar 9, 2010.

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  1. Leafy Cronmer

    Leafy Cronmer Member

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    Simple question, What are the Pros and Cons of a hammer mounted firing pin?
     
  2. Thaddeus Jones

    Thaddeus Jones Member

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    Pros, reliable, easily replaced if not, "looks" right.

    Cons,................dunno. TJ
     
  3. Dave T

    Dave T Member

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    Biggest "pro" would be that they worked fine for well over 100 years and it usually is a good idea to not fix what isn't broken. It is also simpler in that there are less parts involved and often simpler is better.

    That all being said, Ruger has used a floating, frame mounted firing pin in their single actions center-fire revolvers for over 50 years and I've never heard of one breaking, so...

    Dave
     
  4. 1980

    1980 Member

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    Hammer mounted firing pin is supposedly less safe than the transfer bar mechanism that Ruger uses and can not be dry fired without risk of damage.
     
  5. RonBernert

    RonBernert Member

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    You are both right, and the first time I have heard of a firing pin on a ruger jamming is posted right now.. Ruger Service Six issue is the post. Not sure if this is the exact problem, but it seems to be..

    http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=510297
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2010
  6. Confederate

    Confederate Member

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    There's nothing wrong with either system if they work -- and they both seem to. I like the mounted "fang" look of the external hammer-mounted pin, and they certainly would be easy to repair even in a post-apocalyptic societal breakdown. On the other hand, the internal pins on Rugers are almost indestructable.

    Bottom line: It doesn't make much difference which you have. It's like belly buttons -- innies or outies -- either works!
     
  7. Leafy Cronmer

    Leafy Cronmer Member

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    Thanks for the info guys, that was bugging me for a while.
     
  8. lojax

    lojax Member

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    I like the way you put it confederate
     
  9. Dave T

    Dave T Member

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    Not trying to start a fight but I've dry fired S&W center fire revolvers for close to 37 years without there being any damage at all. The Rugers I was referring to in my earlier post don't have transfer bars, they were all 3-screw Blackhawks of varying calibers.

    Dave
     
  10. 1980

    1980 Member

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    Some say it is OK to dry fire those revolvers and some say it will damage the firing pin. I don't own a S&W and was only repeating what I have read. Notice I said you risk damage, not you will damage. Not trying to start a fight either.
     
  11. jad0110

    jad0110 Member

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    I agree with Confederate. It doesn't make much difference to me either way from a functional perspective, but form-wise I prefer the look of hammer mounted firing pins.
     
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