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Rain gear.

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by Owen, Sep 4, 2007.

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  1. Owen

    Owen Moderator Emeritus

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    what is everyone using for rain gear? what do you like/dislike about it? I'm not actually using it for hunting but I figure there will be some strongly held opinions in here.

    Right now I'm looking at the marmot and mountain hardwear stuff.
     
  2. Polishrifleman

    Polishrifleman Member

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    I've got some Wall's quiet hide (or something like that) for pants a Filson oil cloth jacket, and a browning gore tex bucket hat.

    The biggest thing I don't like about rain gear is that it doesn't breath at all and you get just as wet with sweat as you do from Rain if you are an active hunter. I don't sit still too much so personally don't like raingear but it is a must in the Pacific NW.

    In the mist I prefer a good pair of gaiters, a wool jackshirt, and that browning hat.

    If you find something that breathes I am interested.
     
  3. Owen

    Owen Moderator Emeritus

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    i'll actually be using it as a shell/windbreaker as well as for rain, while backpacking.
     
  4. countertop

    countertop Member

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    I've got tightly woven German Army wool pants and a bright red Marmot rain jacket
     
  5. stevelyn

    stevelyn Member

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    Helly-Hansen.
     
  6. sm

    sm member

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    Depends on temps as to how I layer.

    Outer coat is waxed cotton, with a wool liner that I can remove and just wear the wax cotton shell.
    If I should tear this, easy to re-sew, and re-wax.
    One reason I have stayed with waxed cotton, while everyone else went to Gortex or other new offerings.

    I still prefer silk in cool temps to wick moisture off my skin into other fabrics, like cotton.
    Silk socks then cotton or wool keeps feet dry, and dry feet are less prone to get blisters, be it hot, cold dry or wet.

    Wool...wool again is naturally able to resist water and keep one warm if wet.
    Downside is wool gets heavy when wet.
    Even a felt hat (wool) is great for keeping water off face, ears and neck.
    I prefer the "cowboy" or "Aussie" style.
    The waxed cotton hats are great! Barbour's hat, rolls up nice in a pack .

    Summer I have a tight weave "shell" from Woolrich, with a hood that fits into the collar. This nylon (?) or whatever it is, repels water like crazy!
    It comes with a small stuff pouch.

    Wax cotton pants work well, then again it depends on temps, conditions and all.
    I snagged some wool pants with suspenders from a Army Surplus years ago, and they repel water, keep me warm , and really warm if used with hip boots or chest waders.

    I wear these over regular pants, silk lowers, reg pants then these.
    I can slip these off, wet, mud , dirty, and my reg pants are dry and not dirty for the return home.

    Hiking and emergency use, the emergency blankets repel water real well.
    Cit a hole and use like a poncho...

    Army Surplus Ponchos are handy for trail work, keeps both you and the pack dry.

    Location and temps dictate...as always.
     
  7. koja48

    koja48 member

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    Filson chaps when pheasant/coyote hunting, light quiet cloth upper if it's drizzling. Any rain jacket can get a bit warm, but I have nothing bad to say about the Filson chaps, or other Filson products, other than I wish I could afford more of them.
     
  8. Owen

    Owen Moderator Emeritus

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    sm,

    That's interesting that you actually like cotton. The general consensus among the outdoor yankees is that "Cotton Kills" because it gets wet, stays wet, and makes the wearer very very cold. In the Boy Scouts it was common to send kids home from cool/cold weather camping trips if they were wearing jeans or sweatshirts. I suppose if its waxed it shouldn't actually get wet, but still, interesting.
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2007
  9. Art Eatman

    Art Eatman Administrator Staff Member

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    Waxed cotton is a different animal from plain old cotton. It's as close to waterproof as you can get, absent the 20th century's discovery of plastic and suchlike.

    Think of western movies, with guys wearing "dusters", which basically were cotton overcoats that had been impregnated with wax. Same deal for those old covered wagons which crossed the Great Plains.

    Art
     
  10. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Member

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    If it is a light rain, I often tough it out with no protection except my head. A hard rain is just plain miserable to be out in. My rain gear is geared toward wearing it only a short time and not hunting in it long (or walking). So, I have a heavy parka that is oversized and will fit over my coat. On really windy days (and cold), I have been known to put on my rain gear to break the wind. Not fun to be cold and miserable; wet cold, and miserable is even worse.

    Some rain gear is noisy. But honestly, in a rain storm, there is lots of noise already and I don't worry about it. I have a new digital camo suit that I intend to try out that is supposed to breath better. I'll slip my orange vest over top of it, just depends on how long the rain lasts, but I always have a blaze orange hat on during gun season. The disposable plastic bag ponchos work too and they only cost about a buck. I keep one of those in my day pack or vest for the just in case times.

    Frankly, if it is going to rain all day, I don't go out unless it is opening day or the first few days after. Getting sick for any deer is not worth it to me. In years past, I would suffer any kind of weather; not any more. For archery season when I hunted, it's usually warm, so I don't worry about it and the rain often makes hunting better.
     
  11. Devonai

    Devonai Member

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    In the past seven years I have spent many a day in the hard rain while wearing a Gen 1 ECWCS Parka. If it's really coming down I'll add the matching pants, which have large zippered legs for donning over boots.

    I can't recommend this parka/pants combo enough. It breathes great and keeps you dry. The only thing to watch out for is your gloves, if you need them. If your gloves get soaked, the water will wick up your arms and soak your shirt sleeves.

    The clothing isn't as quiet as non-waterproof fabric, so it may not fit your needs. If you can get to an Army/Navy store I would definitely check it out and see if it's too noisy for your liking. Bear in mind that there are cheap "Tru-Spec" knock-offs in the $30-$40 range that are far inferior. A genuine Gen 1 ECWCS Parka should cost $60-$90. A Gen II Parka is up around $250, but other than a stowable hood I don't see much of an advantage to them.
     
  12. salthouse

    salthouse Member

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    Cabelas Dry Plus gear has served me well. Wet snow, rain, and cold temps of northern Maine have not been a problem. Priced a little lower than the Gore-tex gear it seems to be every bit as good imo.
     
  13. Skoghund

    Skoghund Member

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    Just bought a Gore-Tex hunting jacket. The trousers are on order. They cost a fortune but i hope i'm warm and dry this winter. Standing out in the pouring rain or snow while hunting the dog for hours is no fun without the proper gear.
     
  14. sm

    sm member

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    Art-

    Thank you.

    owen,
    As Art shared, this tight weave and waxed goes way back in history.
    Egyptian cotton was considered the best due to properties of the cotton and how tight the weave.

    Sailors also used for sails, and the clothing they worked in the elements in, hats, jackets, pants, or bibs made from wax cotton. Wool "watch caps" will fit under a waxed cotton hat.
    Gets a big chilly in the North Seas.

    Barbour [tm] goes way back in the history of the UK, still worn over in Europe.

    Now some of my wax cotton is gone (fire) still besides just getting bigger, and outgrowing it, one coat is still in use by a lady, and that jacket I wore back in the 70's.
    It has a few places re-sewn, like where a barbed wire fence and I had a disagreement, still it sewed back, and re-waxed just fine.

    Current coat, with button in wool liner, I bought in early 90's.

    I know of one waxed cotton coat that has been duck hunting since before the Depression.
    Granddaughter now wears it. I was with her grandma when she wore this coat at age 82, and using a old Model 12, duck hunting. We had to ask her to NOT shoot, she was felling the ducks and the clients were not getting any shots.
    "Well, when they do shoot they miss with them fancy smancy guns" :)

    Gortex and other modern rain gear makes a unique sound in the woods, like synthetic stocks on guns do.
    Wax cotton, has a different, more "natural sound" .

    I was raised to keep in mind if out and about, I had to have equipment that worked, and could be kept up.

    Now I have never seen or heard of a Zipper going bad on a Barbour jacket, pants set.
    I have on other more expensive newer fabrics.

    Button are my preference, lessens chance of a stuck , then getting busted Zipper.
    Buttons are easier to re-sew on, and a spare or two will not take up much room, them again a stick can be fashioned to make a "button".
    Easier to "work" when hands are cold.

    Ragg Wool gloves are another thing I believe in, I like the fingerless ones, as they allow one to used a knife, shoot, use a compass and all, while being worn.
    Keeps hands warm , even while wet.

    Nothing wrong with new stuff, I understand weight considerations.
    Just IMO, the old adage applies to a lot of "equipment:

    Ninety percent of fishing lures are made to catch fisher-person's wallets - not fish

    Natural fibers such as silk, wool, and waxed cotton are proven, and have been for a long long time.
    Equipment the same way.
    Compasses do not require batteries.
    Number 2 pencils are easy to sharpen with a knife, and there is no ink to freeze.

    Hypothermia can set in at 40* F.

    Some folks got turned around, when the GPS went down.
    They traveled light, had new gear, and could not get a fire to start.
    Rain gear torn, ...in a pickle they were.

    Old scratchy wool blankets - even in the rain. One fashioned into a "tent" and my Zippo started a fire in the wind. Yeah the blankets were heavy, scratchy, but they really appreciated being warm in the wet.
    They did not even mind eating Vienna Sausage.
    "Tea lights to start a fire?"
    "Yep, in a hurry, but I could have used B-Day candles just the same".

    My take - Mother Nature can be cruel.
    Common sense, proven equipment will keep one alive.
    Graves are full of heroes , and folks that let newfangled and egos get the best of them.
     
  15. koja48

    koja48 member

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    Ninety percent of fishing lures are made to catch fisher-person's wallets

    Thanks, SM . . . took me back 50+ years or so. I was learning to tie trout flies, & they weren't turning-out quite like the pictures. As I sat at Dad's bench in disgust, Pop came in picked one up & asked what was wrong. "They're ugly," I said. Dad's response: "There's 2 kinds of flies, Son . . . those that catch fish, and those that catch fisherman. Long as you can tie the first kind, I reckon you don't have to worry about tying the second kind." Smartest man I ever knew . . . and I still wear Dad's red-checked Woolrich jacket, even if I can't button it up and it does fit me a mite too quick . . .
     
  16. Owen

    Owen Moderator Emeritus

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    Steve,

    I believe in tried and true as well, but i'm going to be carrying this stuff, on my back, for 2200 miles.

    A duster weighs more than my tent and sleeping bag together.

    Sound? Sound is good. Don't wanna sneak up on any bears by accident, buty I have a jingle bell for that...
     
  17. sm

    sm member

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    Time of year and expected temps?

    I've traveled who knows how many miles in 21 days , in July up in Canada via Canoe and Portaging.
    My rain gear was a old old Woolrich "nylon" of tight weave with no lining.

    In the fall, I did this Canada bit for 5 days, School break, and bit nippy, and used a Waxed cotton coat with wool liner and waxed cotton pants with flannel lining.

    Bears? We had an understanding, if they would not mess with us, we would not kick their butts.

    Heck we could not even fish with live bait according to rules, you can forget having a firearm.
    Not only do bears run fast, they move in water pretty fast too.

    Made sense to us to paddle over and watch the bears swim, Heck I was armed with a Zebco 33 or a fly rod - don't mess with me and my pard in a canoe. :p
     
  18. eliphalet

    eliphalet Member

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    Working several seasons in the Western Cascades of Washington State with guys that work outside year round, the general consensus seemed to be Helly-Hanson.
    I use a long to below the knee coat with a hood and will try to get by with just that here in Idaho along with good boots. No more than it rains here we will avoid it if possible, can't do that on the western side of the Cascades.
     
  19. Owen

    Owen Moderator Emeritus

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    march to whenever. 5 to 7 months Suppose I shhould add that I'm starting in Georgia, and working my way northeast.
     
  20. salthouse

    salthouse Member

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    I am all for old school, but lets not forget that a lot of people on the Oregon trail died of exposure wearing wool/waxed cotton, etc... Modern materials are a real advance that can make your experience more pleasant when the weather turns to &%$#.
     
  21. Mantis

    Mantis Member

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    Appalachian Trail?
     
  22. Owen

    Owen Moderator Emeritus

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    yes, the AT.
     
  23. pfrnkln

    pfrnkln Member

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    Tried and true...

    I have my old mil poncho - it may be bulky and noisey but it keeps me and my gun dry - also - in the event I may get ... "confused" it makes a handy tent. I recently got a "packable" rain gear set on closeout at Gander Mt.
    I may give that a try but I thinks the old poncho will be with me forever.
    Thats just my 2cents
     
  24. redneck2

    redneck2 Member

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    I have an uninsulated Gore-tex archers jacket that I got at Gander Mountain. Hood flips up and has storm cuff and storm hood with drawstrings. Pretty much totally waterproof, and light.
     
  25. 12GA00buck

    12GA00buck Member

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    I have done extensive long distance backpacking, mostly on the PCT. I'm kinda tired and do not feel up to writing a multi volume post, so here's a couple books that will answer all your question's in great detail. Hunting and Thru-Hiking are VERY different activities with different gear requirements.

    Basically you want a water resistant wind shell for general use and light rain, this will breathe better than the best W/B gear and keep you from getting soaked in sweat.

    Also you will want a set of quality W/B rain-gear for the serious storms. W/B rain gear can be coated (cheap), a laminate (better more $) or multi layered membrane (e.g. gortex)

    In really wet weather an umbrella will be a godsend. It's very common among trekkers in other country's, but less so in America. Golite and Montbell make umbrella's designed for backpacking.

    -The Backpacker's handbook, Christ Townsend, 3rd edition
    -Beyond Backpacking, Ray Jardine
    -The complete Walker, Colin Fletcher, Chris Rowlins, 4th edition

    A couple websites too.

    www.backpacking.net
    http://www.aktrekking.com/

    This is the gear I pack for long backpacking trips

    -Golite Hex, basically a Tepee made with silnylon 2lbs, 4oz/ ground sheet
    Sierra Designs 20 degree mummy bag, synthetic insulation
    Golite Gust, Alpine pack 4800 cu.
    Closed cell foam sleeping pad ¾ in
    Wool socks, sealskin socks
    Running shoes, or winter boots/ snowshoes, depends on season/terrain
    Trangia alcohol stove, Titanium cookware, or MSR white gas stove for melting snow in winter
    Windshell, W/B rain gear
    Merino wool top and long johns,
    Synthetic base layer
    Fleece jacket/vest or synthetic fill mountaineering coat (golite buzz)
    PUR/Katadyn water filter
    Platypus water bladders
    Week supply of food
    Outdoor research dry bags for all the gear
    Drop Point hunting knife
    Ice Axe as needed for terrain .(e.g. Glaciers, mountains etc.)
    Umbrella
    Walking stick, black walnut
    GPS, compass, topo maps
    Fires starting kit, sewing kit, general odds and ends.
    Supply of Cigars, coffee, tea, good book
    Fishing pole or gun, depends on the particular trip.
    I try to keep my total weight for a weeklong trip between 25-45 pounds, depending on the season and duration.
     
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