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The crappiest gear you have is better then the best gear you don’t

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by daniel craig, Apr 2, 2020.

  1. CarJunkieLS1

    CarJunkieLS1 Member

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    With deer hunting there are a few things I do not skimp on and that's Boots, Knife, warm clothing, and bullets, broadheads.

    I've used the same gear for the last 4 years, except for boots my old ones wore out. It keeps we warm, isn't noisy and if I do my part animals don't see or smell me.

    The only new gadget type thing I started using this year is a spray called "Nose Jammer" I'm a believer and won't hunt without it.
     
  2. T.R.

    T.R. Member

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    I started out deer hunting with a borrowed Winchester 30-30 and carried a sharp scout knife in my pocket. Other than a drag rope, Dad's Zippo lighter, and hunting license that was about it for gear. But I did buy an orange hat and vest. I hunted with that Winchester until I bought my own rifle at age 16. Then a Camillus hunting knife was purchased that featured two good sized blades. Since those long ago times, a few other gear items have been purchased but I continue to hunt without a backpack.

    TR
     
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  3. George P

    George P Member

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    In would rather have less gear/stuff that is of the highest quality and will last than cheap stuff I have ti replace (usually at the worst moment). My hunting boots are US-made Danners; have had them for almost 40 years and been resoled twice.........still going strong. My old hunting coat (until I got too damn fat) was a US-made LL Bean brown duck coat; had that for over 30 years
    When it comes to things you MUST rely on to stay safe/alive or get you out of a situation, you buy once, cry once and move on; I fell the same way about guns - give me a few guns of utmost reliability and quality over a safe full of cheap junk every time. I am not saying every gun has to be a Korth or a Wilson Combat, but it also doesn't have to be a Jennings or Hi-Point
     
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  4. Highland Lofts

    Highland Lofts Member

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    I have been hunting for fifty years.
    I never got into the high end gear or guns. Maybe if I hunted far away and back.in a remote camp I would buy different equipment, but my hunting consist of going to my hunting spot. Hunt from a couple of hours to stilling from dawn until dusk for deer in Upstate New York. I wear a pair of the high Muck boots, warm close a fold up knife and a straight blade knife. A couple plastic grocery bags, a average manufactured gun.
    Marlin 22 magnum for squirrels.
    Ithaca model 37, 12 gauge full choke for turkeys.
    Winchester Super X3 for ducks & geese.
    For deer nothing fancy just average rifles.
    Remington 788 in 243 cal.
    Ruger 77 in a few different calibers.
    Marlin 336 in 30/30
    I have a few more rifles of other manufacturers, but nothing fancy.
    When I was young i used cheap scopes, simmons, bushnell of what ever.
    Once I got established in life I like Lepould of Redfield scopes in the working mans price.
    Under $300.

    I do not shoot much over a hundred yards at deer so I don't need a more expensive scope or gun with upgrades.
    Never been a high end kind of person and never will be.
    Give me my run of the mill gun, a Schrade or Case knife, dry boots, warm cloths, my reloaded rifle ammo for deer or a pack of CCI22 magum bullets or average shotgun shells for turkey, ducks & geese and I'm happy.
     
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  5. buck460XVR

    buck460XVR Member

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    I look at hunting gear, like I look at other tools of trade. You weigh what you have in your budget against your legitimate needs. You buy the better quality for tools you use the most and where quality is crucial to doing the job right or comfortably/safely. If you ride a ATV/UTV to your heated deerstand, do you need the same boots, than if you are camping in the mountains for a week stalking elk? Do you need the same backpack? Do you really need Filson/Eddie Bauer Safari clothing for the hunt or is it so you look cool in the pictures? Do you spend all your money on a high priced firearm that you use for a day and a half on opening weekend, and then skimp on ammo and time to sight it in properly? How many folks budget money and time for practice? Tools for hunting should be like tools for woodworking/construction. They should be an investment to be depreciated over a period of years, not just the few days we are in the woods this year. One should invest in the best they can afford, but do it wisely. One needs to prioritize their equipment and spend their budget appropriately. I grew up, like many baby-boomers, before Gore-Tex and Thinsulate. Our standard hunting boot was a pair of 5 buckle overshoes with our work/chore boots. Walk all day and your feet were soaking wet from the inside. When I first started to hunt, there were no real readily available hunting gloves, just jersey work gloves or the mittens my mom knitted for us. They got wet, they got cold. Wool was king for both a hunting jacket and pants. While they kept you fairly dry, they got heavier as they got wetter. I remember days when hunting in wet snow or drizzling rain, when my shoulders hurt at the end of the day, from the weight of my old mackinaw. Didn't stop the memories from being made or the quality of the hunt itself. Didn't have a Mr. Heater sittin' next to me on stand, and would shiver off a thousand calories a day. That's why we learned to still hunt, or make slow drives to our buddies, to warm up. Buy what works for you, not to impress your buddies. I used army surplus for years and still use quite a bit of it. The old camo patterns work just as well as the newest. It was also well made and held up well. I buy hunting clothing/equipment a lot of times in the off season when it's on clearance. Like with eloading components, I buy what I think I might need in the future when I see it at a good price, not when I need it.
     
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  6. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Member

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    I'm kind of a minimalist, less is more type of thinking. I hunted the eastern woods, never that far from a car that I needed tents, sleeping bags, etc., just warm clothes for sitting in the woods from dawn till dusk if necessary.

    Used a shotgun for a while, then lucked into a Redfield scoped Browning BLR lever action in .308, and it was my deer gun from then on.

    So, not really an equipment junkie, used the same items for decades and never really thought they were deficient.
     
  7. LoonWulf
    • Contributing Member

    LoonWulf Contributing Member

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    So speaking of making due with crappy gear....I went hunting in slippers on Saturday because I forgot my boots. Not first time and not the last lol.
     
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  8. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Member

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    I guess the snow wasn't too deep. lol
     
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  9. LoonWulf
    • Contributing Member

    LoonWulf Contributing Member

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    one of the upsides to living in Hawaii.... lava rock being a downside
     
  10. HB

    HB Member

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    $700 in fuel to scout will get you a lot further than a $700 scope.

    Cover the basics. The man who stays in the woods the longest wins.
     
  11. Speedo66

    Speedo66 Member

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    I scrambled over lava rock one time on Maui, agree, nasty stuff. But year round seasons on some game are definitely a plus.
     
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