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Ruger .44 carbine (Deerslayer) Should I?

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by soonerfan85, Dec 10, 2012.

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  1. soonerfan85

    soonerfan85 Member

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    I have a chance to purchase a Ruger Deerslayer (.44 mag carbine) that's represented as being in very good condition. The picture I've seen of it appears to be very nice. Seller had been asking $700 but has dropped the price to $550. This is in local classified ad so it'd a FTF transaction. Only reason I didn't buy it yesterday is I'd have to drive 2 1/2 hours to go get it.

    I have no need for a rifle in .44 magnum, but then again I have no need for several firearms I've purchased in the past. BTW, this is supposed to be a 1961, first year for the .44 carbine.

    Any Ruger collectors out there care to comment on why I should or should not "pull the trigger" on this one?
     
  2. RPRNY

    RPRNY Member

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    At $550, you should pull the trigger on it. This is not a particularly collectable/valuable rifle, but, as I recall, this was Ruger's first long gun and it being marked Deerslayer is somewhat notable (Ithaca issued a cease and desist on trademark infringement in {1962?} so there weren't huge numbers made before it became the .44 carbine.

    Who doesn't NEED a .44 carbine? It's a must ;)
     
  3. Slamfire

    Slamfire Member

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    I have seen some ridiculous asking prices for Ruger 44 Mag Carbines from the 60’s. I never bought one so I don’t know if the rifle function and utility justify the price.

    As I recall the magazine capacity is five or four rounds, which is not much compared to the ten in my Marlin M1894.

    Parts will be a problem, they are always a problem for discontinued rifles if you break something. There are fewer parts for firearms made in limited quantity.

    Let me say, if you want it and the price is good, go for it. If I had a pile of surplus cash and nothing better to do I would get it. When I had to spend my money prudently, I bought a Marlin lever action in 44 Mag and still think it was an excellent choice.
     
  4. WardenWolf

    WardenWolf member

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    Rugers typically run forever. The only thing they'll ever need is the occasional spring job. I'd say go for it. A semi-auto .44 Magnum carbine is a great snag.
     
  5. soonerfan85

    soonerfan85 Member

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    I'd buy it primarily as a collectible. I'd rather find a used Marlin 336 in .44 mag as a shooter. Like was said, the carbine only holds 4 in the box magazine. Think I'll pass as I've got a couple of other safe queens and don't really need another. The 336 in .44 mag would make for a fun hawg gun.

    Thanks guys
     
  6. Welding Rod

    Welding Rod Member

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    I had an original 60s vintage. I think the serial number was 2,xxx.

    Had a great trigger from the factory. I wish I never sold it. I was a lot of fun to shoot.

    IIRCC it used a tubular magazine. I don't think the box mag was used until the 2nd gen gun came out many years later.

    If I was spending your money I would buy for $550, unless it was beat.
     
  7. CraigC
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    CraigC Member

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    Kinda simple really. Buy it if you want it, don't if you don't.

    That said, these were very well made rifles. Which is part of the reason for their demise. They were all milled steel, the receiver cut from a solid billet. They were expensive to make and Ruger probably didn't make any money on them. It wasn't until later that Ruger designed a new rifle compatible with investment casting.
     
  8. stan rose

    stan rose Member

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    Get it, if you don't enjoy shooting it you can get your money back by selling it.
     
  9. 6.5x55swedish

    6.5x55swedish Member

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    At $550 I would pass. They are not that hard to find and 550.00 is about an average asking price. My brother bought one off of a gun shop last fall for $350.00 and that was a deal worth jumping at, but 550.00 not so much. They are also expensive to shoot with ammo prices averaging about a buck per round.
     
  10. CraigC
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    CraigC Member

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    Everything that is not a 9mm, 38Spl or .223 is expensive to buy ammo for. That shouldn't keep folks from enjoying firearms chambered in other cartridges.

    http://www.midwayusa.com/category/reloading-supplies
     
  11. Strange Bob

    Strange Bob Member

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    I like them and that price seems pretty good to me. I've been trying to find one locally in good shape ... I prefer the tubular feed too.

    Pull the trigger on it!

    Probably a great zombie rifle too!
     
  12. DM~

    DM~ Member

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    I've had one for years and years, shot a few bucks with it... I've been thinking of getting it out and limbering it up.

    BTW, why would i need 10 rounds? If i can't get it done with the first couple, it's not going to get done!

    DM
     
  13. Legionnaire
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    Legionnaire Member

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    Welding Rod has it right. The original Deerslayer has a tubular magazine. The 1990s vintage Deerfield has a four-round box magazine. Both are fine guns, the earlier being more collectable.
     
  14. clem

    clem Member

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    I have one. It is marked "Deerstalker" and the serial number is #18XX. Which say's that it was made in 1962.
    You need to ONLY use jacked bullets in it. Lead rounds will clog up the gas port.

    Shoot!? Yes, it does and it works pretty good.
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2012
  15. joneb

    joneb Member

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    Are these Ruger 44 carbines finicky about the load used ? I'm guessing they prefer a 240gr bullet but will other bullet weights work the action reliably ?
     
  16. MCgunner

    MCgunner Member

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    Make for a fun hog gun. :D
     
  17. Kahr33556

    Kahr33556 Member

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    I had one,sold it 20 years ago because it would not shoot that good 3 to 4 inch groups at 50 yards
     
  18. saltydog452

    saltydog452 Member

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    We used one as a camping/companion gun. It didn't produce rifle like accuracy. Neither was the accuracy exactly awful. That was with, I think, 180 JHPs on top of a bunch of H110.

    It seemed to suit needs for that purpose, at that place, at that time.

    salty
     
  19. Gordon

    Gordon Member

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    Here is one with the original fiber optic driven red dot sight - the Weaver Qwik Point. Very fast up to about 50 yards after which the 10 MOA dot covers a lot! These guns like 240 jacket ammo and like not so blunt bullet profiles.
    018-2.gif
    019-3.gif
    BTW $550 is top $ around these parts and $450 is more like it
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2012
  20. CraigC
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    CraigC Member

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    I think we finally got the names right. ;)

    Ithaca Deerstalker, Ruger Deerslayer and the later Deerfield.
     
  21. joneb

    joneb Member

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    Oh dear ;)
     
  22. Fremmer

    Fremmer Member

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    That's a little high with the cost of gas for a 2.5 hour drive each way.
    Screw it, go buy it before somebody else does!
     
  23. 6.5x55swedish

    6.5x55swedish Member

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    My point was that it isn't a high powered rifle, it is a rifle (carbine)that shoots a handgun round. And an expensive handgun round at that... Basically an expensive plinking gun.
     
  24. NeuseRvrRat

    NeuseRvrRat Member

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    and an excellent hunting rifle in the woods
     
  25. Reloadron
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    Reloadron Member

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    If you don't buy it I'll drive down there and get it! :)

    I have owned several and really like those little .44 carbines.

    As compared to a Ruger 10/22:

    22%20and%2044.png

    22%20and%2044%20Bores.png

    44%20Ruger%20Name.png

    Ron
     
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