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Scout Rifle Build

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing and Repairs' started by locnload, Dec 2, 2012.

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  1. locnload

    locnload Member

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    Need advice from the gunsmith guys here. I really like the concept of the Ruger Gunsite Scout Rifle, but I don't really have any specific use for one and can't justify spending $900 or so. What I do have though is an old sporterized 303 British Enfield that I inherited some 30 years ago from my dad so it has a great deal of sentimental value and I have no plans to get rid of it. What I had considered, was modifying the old 303 to the "Scout Rifle" concept. Shorten the barrel a bit, add a muzzel break, and attach a picitiny rail on top to mount a forward mounted scope. Not quite the same as the RGSR but it works for me. The action works smooth, its acurate, and the only reason I stopped using it to hunt with was because there really was no good way to mount a scope and I had moved to Colorado where thats kind of a big deal. Several years ago when I took it to a local gunsmith to see if he could attach a scope he just said,"buy a new rifle son" it would be cheaper. Well I did, got a good Modell 700 in 30-06 that has taken a number of muleys, but that 303 put a lot of whitetails, and bear in the freezer when I was a kid, and its staying around.
    What do ya think, possible, worth it, cost effective? :confused:
     
  2. Sam1911

    Sam1911 Moderator

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    The scout rifle concept really only has one benefit -- the ability to use stripper clips to recharge the gun.

    If that's what you want, XS Sights has really cornered the market on that type of mount: http://www.xssights.com/index.php?nID=scopemounts&cID=Scope Mounts&pID=scopemounts

    The real issue may be finding a scope you really like that has the long eye-relief you need and still provides a usable field of view at the sort of magnification that you're starting the whole project in order to get. Scout scopes work pretty well at 1-2.5x magnification or so, but up at higher power levels they really lose out to standard eye-relief models.
     
  3. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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  4. rbernie
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    rbernie Member

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    That's kinda parochial. :) Actually, the scout rifle has a second benefit - handling. It's much easier to carry afield and it's much better balanced for offhand shooting than rifles with optics over the center and rear of the receiver.

    The issue that usually comes up with putting optics on an old milsurp (whether in a forward mount or a more traditional rearward mount) is the poor stock fit that results; the buttstock is shaped for use with the iron sights and you'll not get a proper cheekweld with it once you raise the optical centerline an inch above that of the iron sights. For my No4MkI scout, I wound up using an old Fajen Monte Carlo style buttstock; it didn't look military, but it put my eye back in alignment with the optical centerline.
     
  5. JWF III

    JWF III Member

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    If you decide to gowith the scout, I have a Leupold IER (scout) scope that I've been wanting to sell.

    It was mounted on a Mini 14 and has less than 50 rounds fired with it in place. Great scope, I just couldn't get used to the scout concept.

    PM if interested. I can provide pics and other details.

    Wyman
     
  6. 40 rod

    40 rod Member

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    Just leave it as is, it's a fine rainy day or trunk gun as is if the original sights zero ok. The scout scope thing adds very little advantage , and any aftermarket conventional mount will wind up looking like a science fair project gone wrong.
     
  7. 35 Whelen

    35 Whelen Member

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    First, the Scout concept has much, much more worth than just "the ability to use stripper clips to recharge the gun". I built a .308 caliber Mauser based Scout 20 or so years ago and despite having a dozen and a half more centerfire rifles in my safes, the Scout is the one I pick up 90% or so of the time when I go out for meat. The ball of the once Parkerized bolt handle now shines like chrome from having cycled the rifle countless hundreds of times and I have long since lost count of the number of deer and hogs taken by the rifle when used by my oldest daughter and I. The most recent just two weeks ago today. I took an 11 point with the rifle as he was at a dead run about 80 yds. out. My wife liked mine so much that I built one for her as well. So, ignore the naysayers as I doubt any of them have much more experience with Scout rifles other than seeing them at gun shows. Now to answer your question(s)...

    The scope mounting issue can be addressed with one of these depending on exactly which Enfield you own: XS SIGHT SYSTEMS - SCOUT SCOPE MOUNT I've used this mount on both my Scout projects and they're very well made and solid. I'd strongly suggest you use a Scout-specific scope. Both mine are made by Burris and of very, very good quality, but the Leupolds I've seen were of great qualty as well. With regards to the muzzle brake I'd certainly fire it before I installed one. The few brakes I've been exposed to made the rifles intolerable to fire without hearing protection such as in hunting situations.

    Here's a shot of both the rifles I've built and as you can see, they're anything but "a science fair project gone wrong". Bear in m ind that both these rifles were rock-stock military arms when I started with them, in fact both of them wear their original stocks...slightly modified, of course;)

    The wifes, finished last year just in time for deer season:
    [​IMG]

    ...and mine, finished in time for 20 or so deer seasons:
    [​IMG]

    Good luck!
    35W
     
  8. dirtyjim

    dirtyjim Member

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    one of the easist ways to do a scout on a milsurp is to have the barrel d&t'ed for a thompson contender mount.
    buy the scope and mount, the install the scope in the mount and position it where it works best. then mark the barrel. remove the scope and take the barreled action and the mount to your smith and tell him to mount this here.
    done and shouldn't cost you over $75+scope & mount
     
  9. Sheepdog1968

    Sheepdog1968 Member

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    I find my 30-30 lever action with a scoup scope, back up irons, and a 16.75" barrel makes a handy scout like rifle. I like it so much so that I take it out more than anything I own. In fact, I like it so much that it has stopped me from want to get a proper scout rifle.

    As others have mentioned, it might cost more to convert what you have to a scout rifle than just to buy a used Ruger scout. Now, if you have the technical skills to do the work yourself then that is unlikely to be the case.
     
  10. thunder173

    thunder173 Member

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    Back in 1963 a gentleman put together a "scout" type mounted 2X Weaver Scope for my Dad on a Winchester 94 lever action 30/30. The concept is not all that new. I still have this gun,...and it is still set up the same way. It went to deer camp this year,..as it does almost every year. It shot minute of deer for my dad until he passed in 1979. Odd thing about that gun. He shot right handed. I and my younger brother both shoot southpaw. I check the zero every year, but haven't ever had to reset the scope.
     
  11. Sheepdog1968

    Sheepdog1968 Member

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    I would love to see a photo of it.
     
  12. ApacheCoTodd

    ApacheCoTodd Member

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    I never really paid too much attention to the "Scout" concept when Cooper was pushing it but it seems what I did glean from scanning the odd article was that his idea was executed as a total package rather than a concept with added options. As well as the main conceptual user being a guide or hunting scout.

    So, what I took from his push was:

    -short action
    -integrated non-obtrusive bi-pod
    -forward mounted optics (ocular or visual versatility for the "Scout"/guide)
    -detachable magazine
    -big game capable round
    -handy, light and relatively short packaging

    Anyhow, that's how I repackaged the writing back in the day of it being pushed. I kinda let that ship sale when folk started to apply "rules" to the concept.

    I remember thinking a "Jungle" carbine with a pistol scope was made to order at the time excluding ammo interchangeability with the hunters being guided or scouted for.

    I wonder if Gibbs would re-barrel with one of the shortened barrels they were putting on their jungles?
     
  13. Jaag

    Jaag Member

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    Scout concept

    I agree with 35 Whelen. Once you have one it may well be your go to gun.
    Several years ago I picked up a Savage 110 in .308 just to have a spare deer rifle around. It was a really good shooter and one day the bug bit and I transformed it into my version of a scout rifle.
    I used a B-Square scout mount for a Rem 700 that required a couple of holes be drilled and tapped. I did pay a few bucks for that service but other than that it was a relatively inexpensive conversion. I cut the barrel to 18" and crowned it with a Manson tool. I had a red dot already and decided to use it instead of buying a LER scope.

    The end result was a rifle that carried and balanced nicely. I shot several deer with it. The set up had its limitations as compared to a traditional scoped bolt action but nonetheless has a place in the cabinet.

    If you want one, I say go for it. If you aren't happy with the results you can always make it into a carbine.
     
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