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Setting Up My Home Range

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by petrey10, Dec 26, 2012.

  1. petrey10

    petrey10 Member

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    Ok guys I just moved to a new property and have put up a 7' high berm about 20' long. Now I just need to put up some targets. I will be shooting anything from 22lr to 9mm FMJ (glock 17) to 25-06 from 100+ yards.

    I would love some steel targets but man would I be scared of a ricochet. But a dueling tree or some swingers or "fall down type" targets would be a lot of fun.

    Really just looking for ideas on what some of you have setup.

    Right now I am setting two 4x4s in holes and concrete so I can run a 2'x8' sheet of plywood to staple paper targets to.
     
  2. 3rdcoach

    3rdcoach New Member

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    Plywood is too expensive. Use celitex
     
  3. clamman

    clamman Member

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    I run a equipment rental store. I use worn out diamond cutting blades for targets. They hold up to most anything for a while except centerfire or 17HMR
     
  4. petrey10

    petrey10 Member

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    I don't mind buying steel ar500 targets but I want my range to be safe so when my wife or a buddy or two want to come over and shoot I don't have to worry about anything.
     
  5. Mencius

    Mencius Member

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    Sorry, don't know much about ricochet and steel targets, not much experience with them.

    Seems like you would want something that is easier to replace than the plywood. After you get a few hundred holes in it you may need to replace. A frame that you don't actually shoot (as much) might be a thought.

    I am actually going to be moving to the country in a year or so and am thinking the same thing, what kind of backstop should I put up. I thought about getting a bunch of used tires and filling them with dirt. Maybe getting enough to make the tire wall 10' wide and 4 tires deep, offsetting them to make sure there are no gaps.

    Another thought I had too was about filling the thing with lead and then having that seep into the ground water and such. Obviously, don't want to eat any blackberries that might grow up on the hill, but I would rather keep the lead as contained as possible. I thought about putting a plastic tarp on the ground and then some sort of cover on top to keep the rain out. Dunno, might be a little too worried about it...
     
  6. petrey10

    petrey10 Member

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    i just built a dirt berm.... I don't have anyone in my shooting direction for well over a mile
     
  7. Dave P

    Dave P Senior Member

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    Lead does not leach into the ground water.
     
  8. col_temp

    col_temp Member

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    If you angle the targets a bit and make them so they hang you shouldn't have to worry too much about ricochets.
    Make sure you use sand or dirt with out rocks in the backbround and below the targets and you won't have any issues.

    Out local range actually uses old tires at the end of the range. When the bullets hit the steel plates behind them (Angled not squared!) the rubber catches the fragments.
    Get a couple of old tractor tires instead of the plywood!
     
  9. ColtPythonElite

    ColtPythonElite Senior Member

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    I shoot steel several times a week. If the target is angles toward the ground a bit, the bullet will go down. Or, I should say what is left of it. Lead bullets tend to splatter even with a .22 lr. About all I find left of .22 lr is a small round button that is about a thick as a credit card. You can see it fly off the steel. The rest just splatters.
     
  10. Ehtereon11B

    Ehtereon11B internet infantryman

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    I have done some research into this myself since I plan on buidling my own range in the next few years. Most of the people I listen to for buidling backyard ranges are people like hickok45 who is often quoted on here. He uses AR500 steel targets. To avoid ricochets he faces them at a slightly downward angle to deflect rounds into the dirt. He also doesn't shoot too close, I think his closest handgun target is 15 yards. And he uses FMJ or cast lead rounds, no hollow points or anything fancy.
     
  11. Hunter125

    Hunter125 Member

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    As for a target stand, I used old pallet wood and made it so I can cut a 1/2" sheet of plywood into 12" x 4' strips and just slide a new strip into the stand. No need to take a drill with me or wrestle old rusted screws or nails out first, just slip a new sheet in. One sheet gets me 8 backs and if you cut them all at once they don't take up much space. And the pallet wood is easily replaceable if you get a stray shot, low or no cost. Of course you could increase the dimensions, make it 24" or 36" x 4".

    I have had it for almost two years now and have gone through about 6 backs. I'd say they last 200-500 rounds of .40.
     
  12. Chuck R.

    Chuck R. Senior Member

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    I’ve also got my own range; pistols out to 30 meters and rifle from 100-500 meters. All of my steel targets are made of AR500 from either Arntzen targets or Quality Targets. I have a couple permanent stands, but mostly use portable stands from Arntzen so I can switch up the COFs we setup.

    Shooting properly made steel, that’s in good shape, that’s properly hung (angled downward) is the key to safe shooting. Shooting damaged/dimpled steel is a recipe for excessive splash back.

    IMHO AR500 is the way to go, it is expensive, but so is shipping regardless of what steel you buy. Softer steel will dimple and dent over time. Might as well cry once and get it over with.

    http://www.arntzentargets.com/

    http://www.qualitytargets.com/servlet/StoreFront

    Chuck
     
  13. loose noose

    loose noose Senior Member

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    I have access to a public/private range, and what I did is I took 2 square tubular 2" steel pieces about 2' in length, and welded a base about 2.5' around the upright square tubular steel. I then split 2X4s down the middle, and made a frame. The wood frame sets in the steel square tubular pieces, and is very solid. BTW, I cover the wood frame with cardboard. When the cardboard gets shot out I just replace the cardboard. Works for me. The stand is fairly heavy and holds up in the wind very well. I got the idea when I was a Police Officer, that is what we used. The total cost to make the stand is about $25.00 - $50.00, but they last a lifetime.:D
     
  14. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    7" is too low for a berm at those ranges. You need a high enough berm with enough material thickness at head height to ensure that the highest power round can not penetrate. You need enough height that at the maximum range you'll be shooting that the top of the range is well and clearly above a head high target.
     
  15. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    hso beat me too it. A bigger backstop would be much safer, if not downright necessary.


    I shoot steel a good bit. If set up correctly, and not shot at from too close, and safety glasses are worn, it is plenty safe. I just got a new piece of steel from jcsteel on the group buy. Excellent stuff.
     

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  16. petrey10

    petrey10 Member

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    Any pictures on how u set those up?
     
  17. Jenrick

    Jenrick Senior Member

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    I buy waxed cardboard backers from LEtargets , and use zip ties to attach them to a piece of 550 cord. I have another pair of cords along the bottom that braces them from blowing forward or back in the wind. Very cheap setup, and surprisingly durable.

    -Jenrick
     

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