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Should I Worry?

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by RatDrall, Mar 11, 2010.

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  1. RatDrall

    RatDrall Member

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    I got a very good + condition S&W Model 64 from J&G sales a couple of weeks ago. The outside was in fantastic condition and the action feels brand new. I opened it up and thought there was rust everywhere, but it was just some really caked on brown crap that came off with some Gunscrubber. After it the action was degreased I coated everything with Breakfree CLP. I wiped it down the best I could, short of disassembling any further than removing the sideplate, then dry fired it until the excess oil ran out around the trigger.

    Upon further inspection there is some rust in two places. The first place is inside of the cut on the hammer where the firing pin rotates. The second area is underneath the trigger, in those rectangular cuts. The rust is in the corners where it cannot be gotten to with any tools that I have.

    My first question is: would you worry about it? I coated the rusty areas with Breakfree so I don't think it will get worse, and it doesn't seem to affect function one bit.

    A new hammer and trigger will cost about $100 plus the cost of having a gunsmith fit them properly.

    I was considering taking both parts out and soaking them in that acid that eats rust. I know how to remove the hammer, how difficult is it to get the trigger out?

    Thanks for any advice :D
     
  2. Old Fuff

    Old Fuff Member

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    Since the model 64 is a stainless steel revolver, and the exterior is in "fantastic" condition, I wonder if the brown stains are dried-out rust preventative rather then rust itself.

    Since you don't want to completely disassemble the gun (a wise choice if you don't know how) I would suggest that you buy some inexpensive Marvel Mystery Oil (available at any automobile store or department) and a disposable meatloaf pan (from any supermarket).

    Remove the front sideplate screw, and then unlatch the cylinder and slide it and the yoke forward and off the frame. Then pull the yoke forward and off the cylinder. If you have not done so, remove the stocks.

    Cock the hammer and place the frame, cylinder assembly, and yoke into the meatloaf pan, and pour enough oil over the parts to submerge them. After several hours lower the hammer and put the frame back to soak some more.

    After 4 or 5 hours remove the parts from the oil bath, and use an air hose to blow out excessive oil. Wipe off the exterior with paper towels and then safely dispose of them. Pour the remaining oil back into the original container because it can be used over and over.

    Reassemble the revolver. Some brown stains may remain, but it won't rust - if indeed it did in the first place - which is questionable.
     
  3. harmonic

    harmonic member

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    http://thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=397027

    Be advised, sometimes itty bitty springs have a notion of going airborne, and they're not too easy to find on carpet.
     
  4. RatDrall

    RatDrall Member

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    Wow, thanks for the link. I am going to call Brownells and order some S&W specific tools and just take the hammer and trigger out and bathe them in muriatic acid. Now to find where I can get some acid...
     
  5. GRIZ22

    GRIZ22 Member

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    I'm with Old Fuff on this. The description you gave of the innards supports this. I've bought more than one old gun from someone (Grandpa's, has been sitting in the sock drawer for 60 years) that looked great from the outside but looked like everything inside was rusted. Turned out to be dried oil.
     
  6. MachIVshooter

    MachIVshooter Member

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    You don't need any special tools to tear down the lockwork on a smith. Just a good screwdriver set, small needle nose pliers, a pick and good eyes/careful hands.
     
  7. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    Needle nose pliers???
    What's that for???

    rc
     
  8. RatDrall

    RatDrall Member

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    I called Brownells and they couldn't find good eyes and careful hands, so I just ordered the other stuff.

    Thanks for the help guys!
     
  9. W.E.G.

    W.E.G. Member

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    Dried lubricant, chicken-grease, mucosal excretions, with a dash of Eaue-de-Doodahdey aftershave.

    Don't think any of that is rust.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. bdb benzino

    bdb benzino Member

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    I purchased a model 10 that was sweet on the outside and when I poped the side plate there was brown gunk in mine as well. A little scrubbing with a brush and cloth soaked with Otis gun cleaner, and it looks like new!!

    Good luck!!
     
  11. RatDrall

    RatDrall Member

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    W.E.G. that is a great picture. The orange and brown spots are what wiped off of my internals, but there is still rust on my hammer and trigger, which are not hard chromed, or whatever kind of coating is on the hammer in the picture.
     
  12. SwampWolf

    SwampWolf Member

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    Looks like good ole WD-40 that has sat in the crevices for a while-ask me how I know...:(
     
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