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Some DIY strops

Discussion in 'Non-Firearm Weapons' started by streak, Apr 6, 2019.

  1. streak

    streak Member

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    I decided to try my hand at sharpening on a stone. I bought a Norton India stone and made a nice walnut box for it. I then added a small paddle strop.

    sharpen1.s.jpg

    I found the paddle strop to be a bit light weight so then made a 12" x 3" version. Both coated with Dialux green compound. Results so far have been great. I recently also added a 2k Shapton Pro as an interim step between the the Norton and the strop with superb results. I used veg tanned leather glued onto plywood for the strops. The one below is rough side up, I also made another one with smooth side up. The knives in picture are the Honey Badger ball bearing flippers.

    strop5.jpg
     
  2. JohnKSa

    JohnKSa Moderator Staff Member

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    If you want to go really cheap, you can take a piece of solid cardboard, (not the stuff they make boxes out of, the stuff that's the backer on a notepad) and use a bar of Flexcut Gold to cover it in compound. Works really well for awhile and when it wears out, you throw it away and make another one. The bar will last pretty much forever and if you keep your eyes open, you can have an endless free supply of strop material.

    The wood-backed leather strops are definitely nicer and are very durable. I like the rough side up, but maybe for very fine edges, smooth side up is better.
     
    earlthegoat2 likes this.
  3. streak

    streak Member

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    John, my neighbor is in the leather business and he gave me this whole roll of leather. I cut pieces to size wet it and then rolled it with a heavy roller to harden it up. Then melted some of the green compound with some mineral oil and applied it to the dry leather. I then left the completed strop in a warm place for a few days allowing the compound to absorb into the leather. As a finishing touch I added a rubber base to stop the strop from sliding around during use.
    Not my neatest work but perfectly functional. I now just give the knives a few passes on the strop every week or so which really keeps the edge nice and sharp until it gets blunt enough to take back to the stones.

    leather.jpg
     
    Slamfire, Fiv3r, JohnKSa and 2 others like this.
  4. RA40

    RA40 Member

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    I've been meaning to make one up and this will motivate me. :) One of the skins I picked up was discounted due to the uneven thickness, that section/s will be good for this type of use. The make-shift is rubbed with white buffing compound.
     
  5. earlthegoat2

    earlthegoat2 Member

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    The flesh (rough) side of the leather can hold abrasive compound better than the hair (smooth) side.

    I use the flesh side for rougher grit compound and the hair side for finer grit. I have about a dozen strops like these around as I too am in the leather (and sharpening) business.
     
  6. Fiv3r

    Fiv3r Member

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    Stropping is so underrated. I learned the value of a strop when I got into heavy convex edges years ago when I started buying khukuris.

    I go super cheap and easy. I take an old piece of scrap leather from my sheath/holster projects and simply knead in car scratch polishing compound. For most steel it works just fine. All of my edc knives pop hair with very little effort and a little preventive stropping really saves on blade wear and tear of waiting to do a full sharpening when your knife goes butter dull. I only hone my knives when I damage them.
     
    sparkyv likes this.
  7. streak

    streak Member

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    @RA40 pleased that my post motivated you! Post a photo when you're done.
    @earlthegoat2 yes I agree. I have made one with smooth side up no compound and also tried smooth side up with compound. It took a lot more work but did manage to get the compound to stick. It's fun experimenting.
    @Fiv3r now that I use my strops regularly I am really beginning to see their value in maintaining edges between sharpening. My giant 12x3" one gets used many times a week between my EDC knives and the kitchen knives too.
     
  8. sparkyv

    sparkyv Member

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    I've done the same thing except mine is ~2" wide, streak. I even made one (saw a guy using one on the internets) that is small enough to fit in the small Altoids tin to fit in my pocket. Keep it by my recliner; works great in a pinch or when I'm too lazy to walk out to the garage.
     
    streak likes this.
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