Quantcast

Some Japnaese WWII Goodness

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by gun addict, Aug 19, 2013.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. gun addict

    gun addict Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2009
    Messages:
    489
    Location:
    Missouri
    I have a weird fascination with Japanese WWII militaria despite my ethnicity (Chinese(, anyway here are some typical equipments you would find on a junior grade IJA Officer at least in the start of WWII
     

    Attached Files:

  2. tyeo098

    tyeo098 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2010
    Messages:
    2,060
    Location:
    The Old Dominion
    Thats an awesome collection with an awesomely posed picture!
     
  3. Phantom Captain

    Phantom Captain Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Messages:
    594
    Location:
    Indiana
    Really nice collection! I have to admit I love Japanese culture and history too.
     
  4. content

    content Member

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2009
    Messages:
    2,015
    Location:
    South Carolina, born in Valley Forge Pa.
    Nice collection, they look to be outstanding examples. Intact mum is a plus.

    I've never seen an ammo box before, if that is one.
    How did you find the Katana?
     
  5. gun addict

    gun addict Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2009
    Messages:
    489
    Location:
    Missouri
    some more WWII posed pics, with a Yasukuni Shrine forged Gendaito sword, would've been one of my most prized possesion if some GI hasn't sawed part of the tang off :mad:

    Then again, he probably went through WWII and who am I to judge him?
     

    Attached Files:

  6. gun addict

    gun addict Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2009
    Messages:
    489
    Location:
    Missouri
    It is a Japanese front ammo pouch, early war before they figuered out that leather does not last well in humid jungle enviroments like Guandalcanal. Ive been collecting Japanese swords for awhile now and as rare as they are you can still find them locally with the right connection and if you ask the right people
     
  7. il_10

    il_10 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2009
    Messages:
    414
    Location:
    Virginia
    I was of the impression that the tangs of many family swords were cut off to be standard military length per Japanese military regulations. I could definitely be wrong about that and would certainly invite correction of that notion if wrong, as would, I'm sure, the WWII collector from whom I heard it.
     
  8. blitztech

    blitztech Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2013
    Messages:
    42
    This is very similar to what I've heard as well. I don't remember the specifics, but almost all were cut down to length for some reason I don't remember.
     
  9. Dr.Rob

    Dr.Rob Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2002
    Messages:
    16,149
    Location:
    Centennial, CO
    Good looking Nambu
     
  10. gun addict

    gun addict Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2009
    Messages:
    489
    Location:
    Missouri
    Thank you Dr Rob, for how late war it is the finish is suprisingly smooth and worksmenship still excellent, I send a pic of it to my parents and my mother immediately called it "ugly" and "looks like a one legged cripple":rolleyes:

    Most family swords that on mounted on Gunto pattern furnitures would either have the furniture custom made to fit the sword or extra whole drilled in the tang so that it would fit. However with my Yasukuni blade much of the tang was sawed off for no reason other than easy carry in dufflebag, fortunately the smith's signature was left intact and I was able to get some history of the blade
     
  11. HoosierQ

    HoosierQ Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2008
    Messages:
    2,575
    Location:
    Central Indiana.
    I would expect that the tang was cut off by a Japanese arsenal to make the sword fit Japanese Army standards. I doubt seriously if a GI would bother or even have a reason to do so. So I think the GI with a hacksaw is off the hook here. The number one vandal of fine (even exquisite) Japanese swords of all times was the Japanese military government during WWII! Thousands upon thousands of heirloom swords ruined (as far as collector value).
     
  12. gun addict

    gun addict Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2009
    Messages:
    489
    Location:
    Missouri
    Negative Hoosier, if the military wanted to cut down a heirloom sword it would've been done professionally and nakago reshaped or a new hole drilled in the tang, not completely cut with a hacksaw. The sword is also not a "heirloom" sword by definition as it was forged after 1930s sometime in the Yasukuni shrine by the smith Yasunori, a GI is definitely to blame , i'll take a pic of the extensive damage done.

    Think of the tang cut as equivelent of a "duffle cut" if you will, for how long the Yasukunito is I can see that some Marine taking the handle off, saw off what he can on the tang in order to stuff it in his seabag
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2013
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice