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Still working on them holsters...

Discussion in 'Handguns: Accessories, Holsters, and Optics' started by Michael Tinker Pearce, Jul 14, 2017.

  1. Michael Tinker Pearce

    Michael Tinker Pearce Member

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    I've got a lot of oddball guns and usually have leather around owing to my to work so I am in the habit of making my own holsters. These aren't anything like professional quality but they work, and I keep trying to improve. This is my latest effort- a western-style holster for my Remington Bulldog. Fully lined, stitching inletted into the leather; it's quite stout. Not there yet, but getting closer...
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  2. bannockburn

    bannockburn Member

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    Tinker

    Looks like your leather crafting skills are coming along nicely. Still get a smile out of seeing your snubnose Remington!
     
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  3. Randyc74

    Randyc74 Member

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    Not bad my friend. The holster compliments that revolver nicely.
     
  4. Sunray

    Sunray Member

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    What are you using as a hole punch? If you don't have a 1/8" multiple hole tool(1/8" holes, 1/8" apart. Tandy's), a 2" common nail, filed to a knife edge works extremely well. It's 1/8" wide when filed and makes a cleaner hole for thread vs a round punch. The nail is really good for over 1/4" thick projects too. And rubber cement to hold the pieces together.
    Been using phone books as a backer for eons.
    You'll find black dye comes out more even. And regular shoe polish as a finish. Hides the thread well too.
    And trauma/EMT shears(these https://www.mec.ca/en/product/4015-898/EMT-Shears. No idea where you'd get 'em Stateside. Bought 'em in a Dollar store, I think, years ago.) cut leather easily and cleanly.
     
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  5. Michael Tinker Pearce

    Michael Tinker Pearce Member

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    I'm actually drilling holes on my drill press- quite a bit smaller than 1/8", and thinking of going smaller yet.
     
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  6. Malamute

    Malamute Member

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    A friend has made holsters for some time for his own use, and made me a few, hes made some very good ones, they look very consistent. He uses an overstitch wheel I believe, to lay out the hole spacing evenly, and an edge grooving tool to make a line to follow and make the thread be below the surface level. He also uses a drill press to make his holes. Glueing in the welt and edges helps keep it all even while stitching, and a drum sander in the drill press makes a nice even edge when done stitching. An edging beveler (like a little skiver) helps get the edges cleaner looking, and a burnishing tool chucked in the drill press makes the single thickness edges very clean, I believe he also puts a touch of beeswax on the edge hes burnishing.

    I made a few, but didn't go to the levels some have. Its fun making your own holsters though. Youre doing pretty well. Like anything, the longer you do it, the more you learn.
     
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  7. entropy

    entropy Member

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    Michael, just pretend they are sheaths; your personal Seax sheath was enough to put most holster makers to shame. Granted the shaping is a bit different, but looking at this one, there's no problem with that. Nice work!
     
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  8. armoredman

    armoredman Member

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    Very nice sir, probably close to period correct and made the way they were back then...minus the drill press. :) Love the wheelgun, looks great.
     
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  9. CraigC
    • Contributing Member

    CraigC Member

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    I would strongly suggest punching your holes with a diamond shaped awl instead of drilling them. Not only is it always really an obvious eyesore to see them drilled but an awl results in a better stitch. The drill bit removes material, whereas the awl does not. The diamond shaped awl leaves a hole that will close up around the stitch once it's done. You can still punch them with the drill press with an awl blade chucked in it, you just don't turn it on. I would also strongly suggest three basic tools, an edge beveler, an overstitch wheel and a stitch groover.

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  10. Michael Tinker Pearce

    Michael Tinker Pearce Member

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    It's funny, I've used a diamond-shaped awl for medieval leatherwork for years; it never occurred to me to make one I could mount in the drill-press. Excellent suggestion, thank you! As it happens I'm headed for the leather store today and I'll look for those other tools. I made a simple 'frontier-style' holster for my Frontier Scout were I grooved the stitching and used a much smaller drill; the stitching came out pretty well but I still like the idea of the awl, and it will be dead-simple to fabricate one.

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  11. Sunray

    Sunray Member

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    Which hole punch you use is mostly about speed. Plus a certain amount of 'pretty'. The Tandy's tool I've used for 30 some years(lotta Medieval leather clothing, pouches, etc. too. Used the nail for a sword scabbard.) punches 4 holes at once. They sell tools that do 8. Never used anything else myself.
    Drills and awls are too slow. Not as big a deal when making holsters, but a scabbard or jerkin needs a whole lot of holes.
     
  12. CraigC
    • Contributing Member

    CraigC Member

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    Yes, lots and lots and lots of holes!

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  13. Creaky_Old_Cop

    Creaky_Old_Cop Member

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    I make all my own holsters.
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  14. SHOOT1SAM

    SHOOT1SAM Member

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    Gotta agree with bannockburn: that Remington snub (& the holster combo) is sweet!!

    Sam
     
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  15. Michael Tinker Pearce

    Michael Tinker Pearce Member

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    Thanks Sam- I love that gun; it's a ball to shoot! Been working on another- not quite a snubby but compact- chambered in .44 Colt, and this time I did the converter myself!
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  16. dog gone it

    dog gone it Member

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    Im no expert but it looks like you did an excellent job imo.
     
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  17. If1HitU

    If1HitU Member

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