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"Tactical" Bolt guns???

Discussion in 'Rifle Country' started by FNFiveSeven, Apr 3, 2003.

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  1. FNFiveSeven

    FNFiveSeven Member

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    I was just wondering what is it that makes one type of rifle a "tactical" rifle and another rifle a "hunter/spoter" rifle. Sure, I can see the differences externally, for example the different stock styles... but what features do each rifle have that make them better suited to their respective jobs? Why can't a "tactical" rifle be perfect for hunting and vice-versa? Both rifles can be obtained with super (less than 1/2 MOA) accuracy, so that doesn't seem to be a deciding factor? Thanks for any help.
     
  2. BlkHawk73

    BlkHawk73 Member

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    "Tactical" rifles will make the owner into a "billy-bad-a$$" while those dubbed as sporters are only good for hunting. Is a little thing the business world uses. It's called marketing! For the most part the stocks are the difference. Some "tacticals" have a non-luster finish so you can hide and not give off a reflection.

    Just like how owning a "magnum" is more macho than not, owning a "tactical" is more macho than a sporter.
     
  3. FNFiveSeven

    FNFiveSeven Member

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    well,

    OK, let's assume that the main difference is the stock. What is it that you can do with a "tactical" stock that makes it better suited to "tactical shooting" that you can't do as well with a sporter stock? Why is a "tactical" stock not as good for hunting as a "sporter" stock?

    Thanks again for the info.
     
  4. tango3065

    tango3065 Member

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    The bad part with most modern bolt hunting rifles is they dont have any sights, I use a scope but what if all hell ever breaks loose and u damage that scope then what?
     
  5. Art Eatman

    Art Eatman Administrator Staff Member

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    blackrazor, I've been shooting rifles longer than a lot of folks have been alive. If I knew the answer to your question I'd tell ya!

    I don't have any problems with offhand shooting with my sporter; nor from a hasty rest, and certainly not from a benchrest. I dunno. Pull trigger; hammer faw-down-go-boom; stuff falls over dead-flop. Dangfino...

    mastinson, after fifty-three years of using scope-sighted rifles, I've found that they get skinned up less during involuntary descents down mountains than I do. I basically fail to understand the problem. If "hell breaks loose" as in some sort of societal collapse (local or otherwise), the last thing I'm gonna do is be around hostile people within butt-stroke distance.

    :D, Art
     
  6. Quintin Likely

    Quintin Likely Member

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    "Tactical" bolt guns...when I think of something like that, I think of something that started off as a varmint rifle...heavy barrelled, accurized (bedding and whatnot) Synthetic stock preferable, adjustible for LOP and stock weld to the eye. Usually, no iron sights fitted, at least there's none on any of my "tactical" rifles. Trigger should break cleanly, like a glass rod, preferably at 3 lbs or so.

    Optics depend on what the shooting at hand is, but I'd want target turrets on mine, no coin slot adjustments, 3-10x variable or 10x fixed...what it is, it'd have to be *tough* Likewise with the rings and base, one piece Picatinney style preferred. A good sling is a must (we can even make it tactical black) bipods are optional.

    Whole package (optics, scope mounts, loaded rifle) should ideally weigh no more than 15 lbs.

    I don't ask for too much, do I? :D
     
  7. ether

    ether Member

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    "Tactical" rifles are typically flat black, camoflage, or a combination. They also usually sport heavier-than average barrels. They usually have synthetic stocks to withstand the weather, and synthetics are usually tougher. And if "tactical" somehow translates to "hard use", then a chrome-lined bore would be the icing on the cake :)
     
  8. Robert inOregon

    Robert inOregon Member

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    My rifle is "tactical" because it says so right on the bolt. :neener:
     
  9. amprecon

    amprecon Member

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    My Rem 700 in .30-06 is a combination tactical/sporter. When I have a deer in my crosshairs it's in the sporter mode, then if I ever have to put a human in the crosshairs it automatically goes into the tactical mode. Neat huh?
     
  10. FNFiveSeven

    FNFiveSeven Member

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    Why would you not want camoflauge, synthetic stocks, and flat black anti-glare finishes on sporting guns? It certainly couldn't hurt, right? Would anyone here use a "tactical" rifle to hunt? If the answer is no, is it simply because the tactical style rifle is too heavy? Is it possible that the tactical style stock is somehow less suited for hunting? How so?

    Great discussion guys, and thanks for all the feedback.
     
  11. ether

    ether Member

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    "Tactical" stocks tend to be bulkier and heavier. Someone mentioned adjustible cheek pieces, adj. pull length, etc. Extras add weight. A hunting/sporting rifle needs to be relatively light and handy for field use. "Tactical" rifles are more sedentary and stable and usually don't get lugged around as much.
     
  12. Edward429451

    Edward429451 member

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    Well, tactical rifles are weapons. Sporter rifles are toys.:D


    Wups, wrong thread!:D :D
     
  13. Sir Galahad

    Sir Galahad member

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    My Ruger M77 International HAS to be a "tactical" even though it doesn't say so on the barrel. Because Saddam Hussein has one.:D And it didn't cost extra because they didn't have to pay him for celebrity endorsement.:D And it didn't say "tatcial" on the barrel, so that shaved, oh, $1,000 off the sticker price. Those are expensive stamping tools at those factories! Why, I bet the "T" stamps in "tactical" alone adds about $250 per "T" per rifle. :D
     
  14. cratz2

    cratz2 Member

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    Another difference could be the varmint version will be blued or bright stainless steel whereas the tactical should be non-reflective matte black. Maybe an extra sling swivel for bipod use.
     
  15. MLC

    MLC Member

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    Alot of folks are in search of "Precision Rifles" the alternate name for the now maligned "Tactical" rifle. One can easily get the accuracy of a Remington PSS Tactical rifle at a lower price by buying a Remington Varmint(VS, VL, VSSF) or Sendero. Same rifles, different stock and finish.
    A Hunter/Sporter, in terms of consistent accuracy, can't compete with the tactical or varmint class of rifles in extended target shooting due the the light weight/profile barrel and stock bedding. Not to say that sporters wont shoot tiny groups, just that their barrels heat up and change point of impact sooner.
    As ether stated the varmint/tactical class is geared to more sedentary shooting.
    That being said, I shall contradict myself by stating that I regularly carry my Rem 700 LTR around and shoot deer with it.
    ~captain"longwinded" obvious
     
  16. Diesle

    Diesle Member

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    Black, for sure its black....

    Diesle
     
  17. JohnDog

    JohnDog Member

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    Well that might be usefull if you were going to be in a full camo outfit while hunting. Out here in Colorado however, they make us wear 500+ sq. in. of blaze orange and a blaze orange hat during rifle seasons. So any advantage I might gain by having a matte black barrel or scope instead of gloss, is kinda outweighed by looking like a walking Orange Crush ad.

    JohnDog
     
  18. Handy

    Handy Guest

    So the difference between a very accurate sporter and a tactical rifle is: you can do less with the Tac version. The sporter carries easier, is smaller, lighter and easier to shoot in all positions.



    Hmmmm.
     
  19. FNFiveSeven

    FNFiveSeven Member

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    That's what I'm trying to figure out, Handy...
     
  20. TechBrute

    TechBrute Member

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    What makes them different is what they are designed to do.

    Hunting/ Sporter: Lightweight minimalist gun carried around all day and shot rarely.

    Tactical: Heavy gun with scope, bipod, heavy barrel, etc. Suitable for repeat shots with minimal POI change, unsuitable for lugging around all day in the forest.

    Standard Remington ADL (hunting gun): 7 pounds
    Standard Remington TWS (tactical): 11 pounds

    The tactical is over 50% heavier.

    Sir Galahad seems to think that if it says "tactical" that affects the price. I don't really know about that. There's only a $50 difference between a 700 VS (blued) and a 700 PSS. The PSS is parkerized. On any gun, be it a long gun or handgun, a parkerized finish is generally more expensive.

    I'd like someone to illustrate two similarly constructed rifles of the same brand, one tactical and one sporter, that differ greatly in price. I'm sure in most cases the prices will be very similar and any differences in pricing could probably be attributed to one of the minor differences between the two guns.
     
  21. TargetShooter2

    TargetShooter2 Member

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    Rifles

    Hello,
    interesting thread here ,
    you can not compare a tactical rifle to a sporter they are as different as night and day . now you can call any rifle a Tac but its how its put together that makes the difference . a tac rifle will have heavy barrels either factory or aftermarket , either a trigger job or aftermarket trigger 2 to 3 1/2 lbs. heavy bases and rings , it will have a stock that will not change the POI by the elements
    most of the current stocks is out of some sort of glass . so your tac rifle is really a custom rifle that is built to handle about anything that you can put it through . most if not all is sub moa
    that means if that rifle is used that rifleman will be able to put his shot right where it needs to be time after time .the rifle will weigh from 10 lbs on the light side to as much as 18 lbs on the high side . the rifles use match ammo to get the most out of them , so to sum it up you can call them what ever you like Tac/ Sniper/ SPR/ bench /target / even a beanfield rifle .

    i prefer to call mine TargetRifles :D :D

    TS2

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  22. PJR

    PJR Member

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    It's the shooter that makes the difference. Inanimate objects can't be tactical only people can. Therefore, calling anything tactical -- rifle, shotgun, knife, pistol, jockey shorts -- is just marketing hype.

    Whether the person is skilled or competent in tactics is another matter entirely.

    Paul
     
  23. Sarge111

    Sarge111 member

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    Don't make this unnecessarily hard or expensive...

    just say "Ishapore Enfield", or SMLE.
     
  24. QuarterBoreGunner

    QuarterBoreGunner Member

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    I'm going to see if I can further muddy the waters here; what about caliber?

    I have a Weatherby Super Varmit Master, stainless Krieger barrel- fluted for cooling during sustained fire, heavy synthetic stock, Leupold VariX-III Long Range Target 6.5-20x50mm. Harris bipod. Great trigger.

    Pretty ‘tactical’ so far right?

    But but but… it’s in .22-250

    Did I just lose my ‘tactical’ status?
     
  25. Sir Galahad

    Sir Galahad member

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    TechBrute, it was a joke. You know, humor? Levity?:D

    But I have seen gun shops take a heavy barrel rifle, add a Choate stock, a scope and a bipod and do, roughly, a 100% mark-up on the price of everything from rifle to accessories because the tag says "tactical" on it.
     
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