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Tenifer vs Melonite

Discussion in 'Handguns: Autoloaders' started by Slater, Dec 3, 2007.

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  1. Slater

    Slater Member

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    The "Tenifer" process is used by Glock to harden it's slides and barrels, and as far as I can tell, is proprietary to Glock. "Melonite" is used by companies such as Smith & Wesson for similar purposes.

    I've heard that Tenifer cannot be used in the US because of (1) it's proprietary nature or (2) it's environmentally toxic.

    Are these essentially the same process or are there significant differences?
     
  2. Josh Aston

    Josh Aston Member

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    From what I understand they are essentially the same thing.
     
  3. hso

    hso Moderator Staff Member

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    The process and results are the same, the names are changed.

    Greenfurniture's Coal Creek Armory has melonite surface treatments done.
     
  4. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    It is all a family of processes (not one magic formula) for carbo-nitriding steel to harden the surface. The trade names are Tenifer in Europe, Melonite in the USA, and Tufftride in most of the rest of the world. But they are all part of the same series of products and processes from Durferrit GMBH.

    In their own words: "...great efforts were devoted to the development and launching of the TENIFER® process, which is also known worldwide under the trade names of TUFFTRIDE® and MELONITE®."

    http://www.durferrit.com/en/unternehmen/firmengeschichte.htm
     
  5. mikec

    mikec Member

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    Found this somewhere else:
    From what I have read, the process has been evolving.
     
  6. Jim Watson

    Jim Watson Member

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    There are cyanide bath hardening and plating operations all over. Wastes are strictly regulated but the processes are not banned. Although there are a lot of cyanide-free chemistries being advertised on the basis of waste treatment cost reduction.
     
  7. Rock

    Rock Member

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    Another internet myth. Let me guess, you read it on Glock talk?:D
     
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