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Tin Band-Aid Boxes.

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by sm, Jul 5, 2008.

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  1. sm

    sm member

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    Tin Band-Aid Boxes.

    Mr. Johnny Guest, this one is for you sir.


    I was raised to pass forward as mentors and passed forward to me.
    I was also told I was born in the last decade that was worth a flip; and of course my mentors and elders were correct about this as well.

    I ain’t getting any younger, and I best pass forward what needs passing forward whilst I still can…

    Society has gone to hell in a hand-basket, and folks wonder why.
    I know why…

    1. Demise of the Drive-In Picture Show.
    2. Demise of Drug Stores with the lunch counter that served open faced roast beef sandwiches.
    3. Demise of Tin Band-Aid Boxes.
    4 The…

    *interruption*

    “What do you mean by Tin Band-Aid Boxes?”

    *sigh*

    Mentors said I would go through “dimensions”. The said they could not share exactly what these “dimensions” were, but knowed it, when I was in one.

    *dimension*

    Band-Aids used to come in tin boxes, with a hinged lid that snapped shut.

    “What has that got to do with responsible firearm ownership, civil liberties, and taking the high road in life matters?”

    *mentor*

    Tin Band-Aid Boxes are what free thinkers, self reliant folks, and those with ethics, values, and manners were raised with.


    Go get a Dr. Pepper and fried pie, or a RC and moon-pie and come back.

    I’m going to go smoke, come back with a cup of coffee, and do some passing forward.
     
  2. Sistema1927

    Sistema1927 Member

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    Band aid boxes were wonderful for storing all of your various treasures.

    They were even better if you "jappaned" them in a fire and burned off all of the printing.
     
  3. MMCSRET

    MMCSRET Member

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    The old Prince Albert hinged lid tobacco can is in the same dimension!!!!!!!!! I miss it.
     
  4. Thernlund

    Thernlund Member

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    I miss Band-Aid tins too. They were great.

    Their demise is due to capitalism. I can't feel bad about that. Paperboard is far cheaper.


    -T.
     
  5. Sans Authoritas

    Sans Authoritas member

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    They were perfect for bringing home interesting bugs you didn't want to crush while running through the brush.

    -Sans Authoritas
     
  6. Thernlund

    Thernlund Member

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    Heh. I used baby food jars for that. Sometimes mason jars, but if my mom caught me... :fire:


    -T.
     
  7. Sans Authoritas

    Sans Authoritas member

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    Hell hath no fury like a mother whose son broke one of her mason jars while running with a bug. (And cutting yourself in the process didn't usually help, either.)

    -Sans Authoritas
     
  8. M249MachineGun

    M249MachineGun Member

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    Its okay! We have altoids mint tins now! Would you rather use up a box of band-aids to get a metal box or a box of breath mints? Personally, I'd take the mints and a lovely lady to "share" them with.
     
  9. Sixtigers

    Sixtigers Member

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    I do enjoy me some sm writing. Finish soon...the ice is melting in my pop!
     
  10. Sans Authoritas

    Sans Authoritas member

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    It's just not the same. Height, depth, the way the lid opened, the plain jane lettering vs. the fancy new stuff. Just not the same.

    -Sans Authoritas
     
  11. EShell

    EShell Member

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    LOL, mine is full of porcupine quills from the only porky I've ever seen in MD.
     
  12. Thernlund

    Thernlund Member

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  13. murph50

    murph50 Member

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    Out in my tool shed--I still have stuff stored in those band aid tins and a few of the Prince Albert ones too
     
  14. sm

    sm member

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    Tin Band-Aid Boxes were available in different sizes. Some offerings were the same size band-aid in the tin.
    Others had a variety of sizes and shapes.

    There were no big chain stores that were open 24/7/52.; furthermore many areas of the country had “Blue Laws”, meaning stores were not open on Sunday.

    Folks bought what they needed when stores were open. There was none of this running to a store for something, 24/7/52, whether it was a serious need, or just a whim to get out and go shopping.

    Nurses, Doctors, Policemen, Fireman, and anyone else that worked shift work, like at the Plant, had to think, plan and get what they needed when stores were open – like Band-Aids.

    Personal responsibility for one’s self.
    Being self reliant, and having the ability to improvise, adapt and overcome.
    One was respectful, civil and polite with neighbors and anyone else they interacted with at work, or in daily affairs.

    A kid could be out playing, and scrap a knee, and a neighbor would come out, or a kid could knock on a neighbor’s door and that tin band aid box meant “safe” and “everything was going to be all right".

    There was no 911, folks did not need the government to tell them what to do and when.
    Folks were raised right.
    A kid knew his neighbors, as he/she was parented and mentored about not talking to strangers.
    Adults, earned trust of other adults with kids, and the kids themselves. It was everyone’s responsibility to parent kids and be a mentor to not only kids, anyone they had an opportunity to pass on something they had experiences with.

    Manners were used when that skinned knee was fixed up.
    A kid said “thank you” and used “ma’am” or “sir” when addressing an adult.


    Tin Band-Aid Boxes, are more than just containers for band-aids, they make great containers for all sorts of things responsible firearm owners use as well.

    .
     
  15. Husker1911

    Husker1911 Member

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    Enjoy your coffee, sm. Me, I surely miss drinking an icy cold Green River on a hot summer's evening.
     
  16. scrat

    scrat Member

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    you mean they are not tin anymore.



    i guess its been a while since i bought a band aide
     
  17. Rokyudai

    Rokyudai Member

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    Last edited: Sep 9, 2008
  18. justin 561

    justin 561 Member

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    Nice poem, but I hardly see how this is gun related. I do love the band aid boxes though, my grandmother has 20-30 of them in a box.
     
  19. Thernlund

    Thernlund Member

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    sm has some status on THR, so there's more leeway than usual.


    -T.
     
  20. justin 561

    justin 561 Member

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    Oh ok, I did enjoy the poem at least.
     
  21. sm

    sm member

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    Tin-Band-Aid Boxes would hold small glass bottle of Mercurochrome, or Iodine, along with the Band-Aids.
    A tongue depressor, or even a Popsicle stick, with adhesive tape wrapped around it, a gauze pad or two, small pen knife ( with or without scissors) , some tweezers, Gillette Blue Razor blade, needle, pinch of tobacco for bee stings…etc., and one had a durable first aid kit.

    Everyone had one.
    At home, in the shop, the family car/ station wagon, truck, businesses, boats, tractors, range bags, packs, hunting/fishing cabin…etc.


    Add a small compass, matches, and a few other items, and one had the emergency kit all folks were supposed to have, while out hunting, hiking, camping and just outdoors.


    Small parts were kept in these for guns, whether out at the range, or out hunting.
    A very small, still portable, gun maintenance kit, with some oil, patches and the like were fashioned out of the tins.

    Extra ammunition was kept in these, in family vehicles, and the trucks, tractors and other equipment used on farms and ranches.

    Many a person purchased loose ammunition from the hardware store, feed and seed, bait shop, gas station, or grocery store, as it was done back in the day.
    It might be a kid that had turned in some coke bottles for two pennies each that bought a few loose .22 rim-fire shells, or the widow that bought a few .38spls, or the farmer wanting to replace the few 30-30 shells he used.

    The “clink” of cartridges into a tin band-aid was a common sound of freedom.
     
  22. Doggy Daddy

    Doggy Daddy Member

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    Ahhh... fergit about the Band-aid tins. Steve hooked me with the open-faced roast beef sammich. Though I prefer mine closed face.

    And that's with mashed potatos and gravy over it all.

    Dangit, Steve!
     
  23. theotherwaldo

    theotherwaldo Member

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    What about Alka Seltzer bottles? I always used them to hold the bullet lube for my '58 Remington, popsicle stick and all. It fit perfectly in my US surplus grenade pouch that held my fixin's.
     
  24. sm

    sm member

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    Tin Band-Aid Boxes have fought for freedom and symbolize preservation of freedom just as Metal and Wood [Bateman].

    Adults needed to investigate and verify what was going on with freedoms.
    Adults tossed a kid a empty tin band-aid box and that kid was entertained. Putting stuff in, taking stuff out, shaking it, and having a good time.

    Parents could read the evening paper, watch the evening news and stay current with events.
    Politics, Supreme Court, Cold War, John F. Kennedy being assassinated in Dallas, Jack Ruby shooting Lee Harvey Oswald on live television, Lyndon Baines Johnson being sworn in as President of the United States, Gun Control Act of 1968...

    A kid will take that tin band-aid box into the bathroom and take a bath. The kid plays with the tin, and then finally with bath time all done, and tucked in bed, the parents can work on Freedom.

    Letters are typed, envelopes are addressed and postage stamps kept in a tin band-aid box are applied.
    Parents and Mentors wrote elected officials about concerns in regard to freedom.

    The kid gets a bit bigger and crayons in a tin band-aid box, are wonderful!
    In a town meeting a kid can color and entertain themselves, and even share with other kids, so adults can attend and participate in local affairs of freedom.

    At home, the kid sees his parents doing things and wants to be a part of what is going on.
    So at the table with crayons, the kid sees and hears parents and mentors writing letters and, that other tin-band-aid box has the stamps.

    The kid learns to put on stamps correctly and involved in preserving freedom.
    Time passes and the kid is a teenager, and the vehicle they get to borrow, has a tin band-aid box with first aid, extra ammunition and emergency phone call money.

    When the teenager goes hiking, camping, fishing and hunting, that tin band-aid box has an emergency kit.

    As an adult, the lessons passed forward beginning as a kid with a tin band-aid box, are passed forward.


    Tin Band-Aid boxes are more than containers for band-aids.
     
  25. Wheeler44

    Wheeler44 Member

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    This time of year a person should read some of Steve's stories and Ray Bradbury's "Dandelion Wine" while sittin' on the porch wit a big glass of iced tea. (or a small shot of mountain whiskey fer some folks)
     
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