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Uberti & Pietta Questioms

Discussion in 'Blackpowder' started by Bluehawk, Oct 29, 2012.

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  1. Bluehawk

    Bluehawk Member

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    Hi Guys
    I picked up a couple of BP revolvers this week and I have a few questions,
    First is a pic of a Uberti (from Navy Arms)..it's cased in a heavy wood box and am wondering if I paid too much? ($200)
    (I have no experience with Uberti revolvers hence the reason I'm asking)

    Second is a pic of what the guy called an 1860 .36 caliber...it appears to be an 1851 with an 1860 Colt barrel (Pietta)...this is one I have never seen nor ever heard about before...any one know anything about this combination??
    Cost me approx: $130.
    Let me know what you guys think!!!!
     

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  2. Noz

    Noz Member

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    $200 for a boxed pistol is OK.
    The second gun is an 1861. Smaller than an 1860 but looks very much like one. good gun.
     
  3. Foto Joe

    Foto Joe Member

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    Pardon my ignorance but what the heck are those yellow things in the case with the '58?
     
  4. CraigC
    • Contributing Member

    CraigC Member

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    Yep, an 1851 with an 1860 profile barrel is an 1861 Navy. ;)
     
  5. AlexanderA

    AlexanderA Member

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    You did OK price-wise.

    One word of advice -- don't store the '58 in the wooden case (it's not authentic anyway). The lining will attract moisture and the gun will rust unless it's inspected and oiled regularly. And if you keep the gun properly oiled, that will ruin the lining. If you're going to keep the gun in the case, at least put it a plastic bag or other moisture barrier.

    It appears that they're there simply to take up space, to keep the gun from shifting around. The idea is the same as packing peanuts.
     
  6. Fingers McGee

    Fingers McGee Member

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    They're speed loaders. Fill with premeasured powder, wad (if you use them) and bullet. When ready, pop off the bullet (and wad) pour powder in chamber, seat wad and ball, and you're ready to go. They're great when you're out hunting. Just stuff some in your pocket & go. No possibles bag to carry. Not too sure they're really worth the trouble if you're just plinking, target shooting or shooting a CAS match though.

    Ya dun gud on both of them. The second one is an 1861 Navy like Noz and CraigC said; although it is not historically correct. True 1861 Navies were steel framed.
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2012
  7. Foto Joe

    Foto Joe Member

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    Alrighty then, I guess I learned something new today.
     
  8. BADUNAME30

    BADUNAME30 Member

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    I've used them speed loaders while huntin with my Hawken and i'll tell ya they're tough to git that ball out when they are cold. Had to 'bite' it,and the patch, out with yer teeth. Not really any "speed" about the process.
    Also, they 'harden' over time and lose thier flexability and jist don't work well at all.
    I can't imagine tryin to git a ball out of a cold one o' those little ones.
    Fingers, how would ya go 'bout gittin a wad out o' one o' those ?
     
  9. mykeal

    mykeal Member

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    They're flexible tubes. You just squeeze the tube below the ball and it - and the wad - just pop out. Then pour the powder, insert the wad and ram the ball.

    The only 'speed' they provide is in having the charge already measured and the wad and ball all together in one spot.

    I use them quite a bit when developing a load. I measure out the various combinations of ball and powder and write it on the tubes before going to the range. Then at the range I set up the targets on the frames for each combination in the same order as the tubes on the loading bench. Then just work my way down the bench.
     
  10. Fingers McGee

    Fingers McGee Member

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    I'd put the ball in first then the wad on top of it. When you press the tube to expel the ball, the wad would pop out first.

    I've tried speedoaders like them hunting with my .54 Tryon rifle. After fumbling with two before I could get the rifle reloaded :banghead: after missing a nice buck on a trip a bunch of years ago :cuss:, I threw them in the junk drawer. Ya know, They migh just still be there :confused:
     
  11. BADUNAME30

    BADUNAME30 Member

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    I can see where that turned into a jugglin act.
    After tryin mine a time er 3 i found them pretty much useless also.

    I recently found one in the bottom o' my 'man purse' still loaded.
    More than 30 years ago.
     
  12. Jaymo

    Jaymo Member

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    I don't think you got squeezed on the deal. After all, the Remington is a Uberti.
     
  13. towboat_er

    towboat_er Member

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    You did well!!!
     
  14. Bluehawk

    Bluehawk Member

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    Hi Guys
    Thanks for all the responses and again my apologies for not being here as much as I'd like to be!
    I don't keep the Remington in the box...I keep it in the safe. I did take a look at the date code [AB] and according to that it's dated 1976..and in great shape for a 36 year-old gun.
    The 1861 looks brand new and I too would have liked it to be a steel framed model but I didn't want to pass the deal up even if it was a brass frame...maybe someday I'll find a frame for it cheap somewhere.
    Since the first post I also picked up a Thompson Center single shot .45 caliber pistol called the Scout. The thing is a beast,,,big and heavy! I think CVA once sold something like it called the Prospector...(I could be wrong though).
     
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