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Uberti Remington Navy

Discussion in 'Blackpowder' started by Bigted, Oct 30, 2019.

  1. Bigted

    Bigted Member

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    Just recieved from Buff arms, a Remmy navy revolver. Seems straight forward but wonder if any others have experience, history or suggestions concerning the remmy navy.

    Thanks in advance.

    Ted
     
  2. Catman42

    Catman42 Member

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    buy a howell 45 long colt conversion cylinder for it, if it is a .44 cal. and have some real fun.
     
  3. AlexanderA
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    AlexanderA Member

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    The Navy model would be in .36 caliber. Howell makes a 6-shot conversion cylinder for it in .38 Special. He recommends lining the barrel from .375 bore to .357. If you don't reline, you should use hollow-base bullets to get any accuracy at all out of the .375 barrel.

    Of course, relining the barrel to the smaller size would preclude using the original percussion cylinder.
     
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  4. mustanger98

    mustanger98 Member

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    Navy's are .36cal so a .45Colt cylinder would be pointless. [I started to ask about .38 cylinders here, but AlexanderA answered my question.] And how is roll-your-own cap&ball loading/shooting any less "real fun" than a conversion cylinder?:thumbdown:

    What volume powder charge is the Remington type cylinder rated for? Some shoot better with less powder, but be sure the ball seats down on the powder. Are you looking at wonder wads or grease over the ball?
     
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  5. Catman42

    Catman42 Member

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    if you put in a nice 38 howell cylinder you would have to shoot heeled(hollow base) bullets as they would need to bump up the bullet fit tight down the bore. i dont know about percussion. i have 2 of them but i converted them to cartridge as soon as i got them. my percussion cylinders never fired a shot. some one here will help you.
     
  6. skeeterfogger

    skeeterfogger Member

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    The 1858 navy belt pistol can handle load to ball flush. But IMO I would start at 15gns and work up from there until you get the performance you want.
    Wads to me are just another thing to buy but to each their own. I've never used them. I do seal the ball with a mix of wax and veggie oil melted together that when cooled makes a thick and sticky consistency. Again to each their own.
    Typically a .375 ball. My preference is .380. Adds a bit more surface area for rifling engagement.
    And of course #10 primer is typical but have seen some in very rare occasions use #11. Think it happens by mistake or was just what was on hand at factory. But rare.
     
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  7. Bigted

    Bigted Member

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    Yes many many years experience in shooting cap n ball revolvers ... only Colts designs. This 36 Remmy navy is a first for me tho. Have had a fair amount of the new army Remmys but this will be my first 36.

    As my picture upper left denotes, I build paper cartridges for the Colts, but after getting this Remmy deslimed from the shipping oil, I will discover how many grains 2Fg OE it will hold. Then begin making a rolling mandrel to form paper carts that will hold the proper powder charge for this longer cylinder. Plenty meat between chambers and lots on the outside so I would think it to almost be a "magnum" 36.

    This is the why of my querry of you folks. Just wondered if there be any particularities with this Remmy navy that I need to know about.

    Thanks for the reply's. Looking forward to reading more.

    Ted
     
  8. Malachi Leviticus Blue

    Malachi Leviticus Blue Member

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    for me, the conversion cylinders are neat as curiosities, but I don't have much interest in using them (I've acquired some as tag-alongs with a few second hand revolves, but never fired any).
    As an engineer, I love learning how things are done, how their made, and the limits to which creative folks push the functionality of the things around us.
    The New Army is a heavy, bulky gun by today's standards, so a Navy model seems like it would have a lot of appeal to plenty of folks.
     
  9. TheOutlawKid

    TheOutlawKid Member

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    Mr. Bugted...is it a pietta or uberti?
     
  10. woodnbow
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    woodnbow Contributing Member

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    I’m not sure the currently available Navy revolvers are any different from the Army revolver except for the obvious bore size and possibly the barrel length. Originally they were different frames and older Uberti Navy’s were also built on a smaller frame. I don’t believe that’s the case today. At any rate, they’re good for any amount of 4f or 3f powder you can fit under the ball.
    I’m also a fan of Sam Colts revolvers but I’m currently waiting for the second Remington I’ve ever owned to show up in the brown truck. It’s a Pietta Shooters model New Army... can’t wait to see what the fuss is all about!
     
  11. Gordon
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    Gordon Contributing Member

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    I have one from the later mid 80s , I looks like it was made by EURO Arms for LYMAN but is as beautiful and well made as any Uberti I have. It is my most accurrate BP revolver and I have quite a few. I use 24 grains of FFF Goex and a 10 Remington cap as my accuracy load :2" at 25 yards from a sand bag . I smear anhydrous lanolin over the bullets after loading to seal and cut fouling after trying OX Wonder wads it seems a better deal and I use 4 grains more powder. The .375" balls leave a nice sprue and all chambers are even. A beautiful little gun ! It is slightly small frame than an 1851 army and 2" less barrel , about perfect and I prefer it to the 1851 Colt .36 for accuracy by a huge margin..
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2019
  12. .455_Hunter

    .455_Hunter Member

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    My in-laws have an original hanging on their fireplace mantle.
     
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  13. AlexanderA
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    AlexanderA Member

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    Euroarms? The Euroarms Remmies from that period were made by Armi San Paolo. I have one of them, as well as one made by Uberti. (Both are in .44 cal. instead of .36, for what that's worth.) You are correct that the quality is comparable. The Euroarms is a little more delicate in some dimensions (notably the top strap), but many parts, including the cylinders, will interchange. If using a cartridge conversion cylinder, I would prefer the Uberti because of its greater general robustness.
     
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  14. Gordon
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    Gordon Contributing Member

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    I was mistaken, the Lyman branded gun was made in 1978 and was made by Euroarms /Armi San Palo. . It is beautiful and like I said my most accurate C&B revolver for sure ! I only run 20 grainsFFF in my 1851 Colt .36 and 18 in the 1862 Police Colt style guns. The Remington appears far more robust than the colts , other than possibly a Dragoon and they are all .44s .
     
  15. grter

    grter Member

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    From what I know the Uberti Remington (present day production) like all the others these days are the same as the .44 caliber right down to the screws the only exceptions being that the barrel is slightly shorter and with a .36 bore as is the cylinder chambers too.

    The good thing is these have plenty of metal to handle stouter charges and perhaps a really nice benefit of having plenty of steel thickness allowing you to ream the cylinders chambers open for a proper match to bore diameter for good accuracy. I real almost all of these have cylinder chambers less than bore diameter (too small.)

    The .44 version may wind up with very thin chamber walls depending of how much reaming needs to be done to match bore diameter.
     
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  16. Bigted

    Bigted Member

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    She is Uberti ... and outstanding to boot.
     
  17. mustanger98

    mustanger98 Member

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    Right, but what's the charge volume? A Colt type Navy can probably handle 25grs just fine, but why would you want to when 15-22grs works well and pleasant?

    I agree, to each their own... regarding wads vs grease, wads are convenient to use but not necessary if you know you have a compressed charge and a good seal. I'm not sure I'd bet on a good seal without one or the other.
     
  18. Remy1858

    Remy1858 Member

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    Hello. The new Uberti is not made on the correct sized frame. The .36 should be a smaller lighter frame. They just bored it out smaller.
     
  19. skeeterfogger

    skeeterfogger Member

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    But IMO I would start at 15gns and work up from there until you get the performance you want.
    Was the second line. Good grief.
     
  20. mustanger98

    mustanger98 Member

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    I'm not disputing your recommended started load. I'm thinking of the max load which cannot be exceeded in the Remington Navy vs Colt Navy. And I'm not saying max load will even be accurate... it could be, but a lot of times it won't be. Now I'm not sure why I thought of it.
     
  21. skeeterfogger

    skeeterfogger Member

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    IMO, On 1858 steel frame in 36 you can't hurt it at ball flush. Max load in any 36 full frame doesn't need to be over 20. That's getting into 44 cal. I keep it down to not over 18 in colts 36 and 20 in 44 colts. I've seen plenty go to drooping on colts even steel frames from people using too much for the design. Granted I did not know if they were not using pure lead which can be a bad thing too. I've seen 1858 44 brass frames that the top strap was almost touching the cylinder from over loading. I would never shoot 44 or 36 at ball flush on any frame. But the 1858 36 steel frame belt pistol one would be hard pressed to cause any ill effect with pure lead projectiles. IMO
    As far as max load. Every bp gun eats different so to me it's max is what provides best performance without going beyond specifications. I'll take the science approach over macho Every time.
    Other than that, was just messin with ya.
     
  22. mustanger98

    mustanger98 Member

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    Science beats macho, right. Even the Dirty Harry character, with the Model 29, said load light and go for accuracy, all else being bravado. So basically, for whatever reason, they're making the cylinders a lot more durable then they're making the frames. If the frame's not up to it, the gun's not up to it. And if people wreck the frames with too much powder, wrong lead alloy, or both, pretty soon you're looking at a parts kit and maybe not a complete kit.
     
  23. skeeterfogger

    skeeterfogger Member

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    That's what makes it practically indestructible using bp and pure lead.
     
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  24. Eyrie G. Dogg

    Eyrie G. Dogg Member

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    Hi Bigted - congratulations on your new Uberti Remington Navy. What is its proportion relative to the Uberti NMA and/or the Pietta Remington .44 version? Did they make it a little smaller or did Uberti do like Pietta has done with their Remington Navy and put out the exact same gun as the .44 except for barrel length and caliber?

    Yours has a 7.5” barrel, correct?
     
  25. skeeterfogger

    skeeterfogger Member

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    Last I heard the 1856 36 is called a Belt Pistol and has around a 5-6 inch barrel. At least that's how mine is.
     
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