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Which .357 magnum brass is thinnest?

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by fiscus, Mar 9, 2010.

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  1. fiscus

    fiscus Member

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    I want to try loading deep seated wadcutters in .357 brass, anyone know which brand of .357 brass has thin walls that won't bulge with a deep bullet? I've heard R-P brass is fairly thin in some calibers but don't have anything to try before I buy.
     
  2. evan price

    evan price Member

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    I concur, R-P is the thinnest I've seen.
     
  3. fourdollarbill

    fourdollarbill Member

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    I cannot speak for the thinnest other than R-P but the thickest IMO is WW, Winchester and WCC. Your asking for brass with thin walls that won't bulge. Did you mean thick brass that won't bulge?
     
  4. Smokey Joe

    Smokey Joe Member

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    Thin walls...

    Fiscus--You want the bullets into the cases with no bulge at all?? As I understand it, that bulge is what provides neck tension and holds the bullet in place while the burning powder builds itself up to working pressure.

    Now, we're not talking here about a bulge that impedes feeding the cases into the chamber--this is just the "normal" bullet bulge.

    I shoot leage bullseye with a .357 revolver, so you can imagine that I've reloaded "a few" .357 cases. (I use .357 cases loaded with wadcutter bullets, to a .38 Spl level.) IMX, there is ALWAYS a bullet bulge. Same is true for my much heavier hunting loads in .357 Magnum.

    As to Remington cases, IMX too, these are the thinnest-walled. I've stopped using them in .45 ACP because they clearly make for a different neck tension than all the other brands (thus possibly affecting accuracy) and am considering not using them in .357 Magnum for the same reason.
     
  5. chucky

    chucky Member

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    I Agree w SmokeyJoe

    I have a couple hundred 44 Rem Mag brass and wont be getting anymore!
    So thin I have to over-crimp or else I can press the bullet down into the casing with my fingers.
    I'm gonna burn em once and leave them where they fall.
     
  6. fiscus

    fiscus Member

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    [​IMG]

    I guess I wasn't too clear, I don't care too much about the wall thickness at the case mouth, but how soon the walls taper to a thicker size. I am concerned about the base end of a lead wadcutter getting squished down to a smaller size. Out of the two cases in my drawing I want the top one.

    thanks!
     
  7. broham

    broham Member

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    I had a problem a while back with my rem brass in 357. I used to mix my Win with my Rem brass for plincking loads. Every time I loaded a Rem case I could spin the bullet in the case. I would have to adjust my crimp differently for the Rem brass to correct the problem. Sometimes the bullet would spin until I put a super roll crimp on it. I prefer to load other brass.
     
  8. Jeff H

    Jeff H Member

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    Simple solution. Don't use a Lee FCD to post size the round. As long as it chambers, it should be gtg.

    This was not intended to start another FCD debate...
     
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