Which gun gets wolff spring kit?

Which gun would you drop a spring kit into?

  • S&W 10-5

    Votes: 1 12.5%
  • S&W 10-8

    Votes: 2 25.0%
  • S&W 15-2

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • S&W 586-1

    Votes: 3 37.5%
  • S&W 28-2

    Votes: 1 12.5%
  • S&W 629-6

    Votes: 1 12.5%

  • Total voters
    8

silicosys4

Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2012
Messages
3,847
Hi all, looking for experience and recommendations.
I just bought a Wolff K/L/N standard strength power rib spring kit with 3 different rebound spring weights,
and of the guns I have to try it in, which do you think would see the most benefit, or best show what the kit can do?
Please vote your choice.
All actions are presumed to be factory.

1. S&W 10-5, broken in action, very smooth DA with a light 4-5lb SA trigger. This one is getting a bolt spring anyways.
2. S&W 10-8, broken in action, smooth but somewhat stiff DA, with a 5-6lb SA trigger
3. S&W 15-2, broken in action, very smooth DA with a 4-5lb SA trigger
4. S&W 586-1, broken in action, smooth but somewhat stiff DA action with a 6lb SA trigger
5. S&W 28-2, broken in action, smooth but somewhat stiff DA action, 5-6lb SA trigger.
6 S&W 629-6, The best action i've ever felt on a S&W N frame. Extremely smooth DA trigger, with the best SA trigger I own on a revolver. 3lbs with zero takeup or creep. This is kind of a trick question, there is no way I'm messing with this revolver unless god himself shows up in this thread and tells me to give it a try.

Is there a frame size that generally see's better results, between the K/L/N frame?
Do different rebound springs work better in different frame sizes?

Thank you everyone, hopefully I can save myself the trouble of taking a bunch of guns apart to try different spring combinations.
 
You answered your own question . I would do the ones with the stiff DA, but first check out the main springs and verrrrrry carefully adjust the strain screw to where it could be smoother, but not to much because you will experience light primer strikes.
 
As much as I love shooting my model 10 I was going to suggest doing your 10-8, but I would have to go with the 586.

What length barrel is on your 586?
 
Do the ones with the heaviest pull weight. Don’t go too light on rebound spring. Do you intend to polish the rebound slide and where iit rides in the frame? If so you can go to a 14 pound rebound spring. If not better go with the heaviest you have. The stock spring is 18#
 
To start and it's all you may need to do, leave the
mainspring (hammer) alone and merely go to a
trigger return spring slightly less than factory.

Then test by DAing as fast as you are likely to
do in your experience. Don't want a trigger
return spring so light you outrun it's ability
to reset before your next shot (short stroking).

You might be surprised that's all that's needed.
FYI, I used Wilson Combat springs sometimes.
 
Ive yet to see a factory S&W with a DA trigger that wasn't nice.

I dont mess with the springs unless I have light strikes. A lot of times there, the light strikes are because someone backed the strain screw out trying to lighten the trigger and its a simple $0 fix. Just tighten the screw.

If you are using the Wolff "power rib" versions, keep a spent primer cup handy to slip under the strain screw. The "rib" on those comes down too far and the strain screw lands in the depressed part of the rib, and you lose leverage. You either need a shim or a longer screw or you're likely to still have issues.
 
Unless the revolver has a broken or underpowered mainspring, I stick with factory on S&W.

So far I've just bought "Wolffpacks" for my centerfire Ruger single actions. I can improve my groups a bit after lightening their SAA mainspring, so the gun doesn't jar so much when the hammer falls.
 
I'm with trackskippy on this one. If it isn't broke, don't fix it. I've gotten some great groups and split times with some heavy trigger pulls in both revolver and auto. And some problems with to light pulls. I have a Browning HP that had a "trigger job" done on it by a previous owner. It was so bad if you disengaged the safety in condition 1 the hammer would fall. Glad that happened on the ranger and not at home! It's at MK3 custom in Vegas now getting rebuilt. Just my 2 cents.
 
Just my opinion, but I let a trained gunsmith fool with my revolvers. And to echo others, if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. That’s just an open invitation with an ice cold PBR in your hand for Mr. Murphy.
 
If you are using the Wolff "power rib" versions, keep a spent primer cup handy to slip under the strain screw. The "rib" on those comes down too far and the strain screw lands in the depressed part of the rib, and you lose leverage. You either need a shim or a longer screw or you're likely to still have issues.

Yes. I have shimmed one of those power rib things and have the strain screw all the way in on a couple of others.

The next time I want to tinker with revolver springs I will use the Wilson or Clark. And use a Teddy Jacobson strain screw on the remaining ribs. A headless 8-32 set screw with the tip filed into a pyramid to fit the groove. That gives adjustment in quarter turn clicks that stay put. Adjustment? Bad dog.
 
First, and most important, do not "adjust" the strain screw. It is not an adjustment screw. One of the advantages of a S&W over other designs is that the trigger pull can be lightened without affecting the hammer strike force.
Replace the rebound spring with a lighter rated one or trim the stock spring by a half or full coil. Keep in mind that a lighter trigger pull does not mean a smoother pull.
 
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My Ruger Bearcat shot groups with a vertical component 2x what the horizonal component was as it came from the factory. Once I put a 16# Wolff mainspring on it, the groups became (almost) round.
 
Then test by DAing as fast as you are likely to
do in your experience.
Not only that; run the trigger slowly, and make sure it always pops forward.
With slicked up innards, 11 or 12lb rebound springs don't present an issue, but I keep an eye on my tuned revos. I mark the spring weight under the grip; it's hard to tell an unidentified spring's weight.
I'm not Jerry Mickulek, so there's a finite limit to how fast I can run a revo; a lighter, smoother DA works for me.
BTW, likely no sense in getting one spring and kit. It's possible to buy a whole range of spring weights, from 11-15lbs, and some ribbed mainsprings. It's often necessary to experiment with both springs, and see what feels good, and works 100%.
Some folks like to grind the strain screw, to reduce the mainspring weight. I prefer not doing that.
Moon
 
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