Why are Hornady bullets available when Sierra are not?

Sniper66

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I've been trying to build a load for my Tikka T3X Super Varmint .223 and the 62gr Sierra bullet is highly recommended. I have had great difficulty finding this bullet. Sierra keeps promising me they will run them, but end up postponing the run. I've tried some Nosler but they are flat bottom and not that easy to seat. Oddly, Hornady seems to have every variety of .224 bullet imaginable, even having them on sale. Do you guys have any idea why that is??
 
Hornady has made more or sold less. Based on market volumes and the fact you're describing postponed production campaigns, it appears the former is true.
 
It must be a conspiracy. That's the only logical explanation for a bullet company not to be making every kind of bullet imaginable all the time.
The amount of times this rumor spreads when people can't get their loaded ammunition...
describing postponed production campaigns,

Sierra also has military volume contracts, with black hills and what not. Hornandy doesn't; even if they made the same amount im still sure Sierra will just be higher demand.
In the meantime, most of us have discovered Hornandy to be quite acceptable and gives decent accuracy if we do our part.
 
Sierra also has military volume contracts, with black hills and what not. Hornandy doesn't; even if they made the same amount im still sure Sierra will just be higher demand.
In the meantime, most of us have discovered Hornandy to be quite acceptable and gives decent accuracy if we do our part.

...as well as a contract with Federal to supply them with SMK's for their GMM ammos.

I've discovered Hornady, but in some cases... particularly .308WIN... they are not as 'acceptable' as the SMK's. YMMV, of course.
 
Dang red legs just won't make enough. Good lord pick something else .what you want was recommended so you don't know if you need it anyway. So many others to try. Let's get loading
 
I don't have an answer as to why, but I have found that in most cases, Sierra makes a better bullet than Hornady.

Is this purely for target shooting or hunting as well?
 
I've been trying to build a load for my Tikka T3X Super Varmint .223 and the 62gr Sierra bullet is highly recommended. I have had great difficulty finding this bullet. Sierra keeps promising me they will run them, but end up postponing the run. I've tried some Nosler but they are flat bottom and not that easy to seat. Oddly, Hornady seems to have every variety of .224 bullet imaginable, even having them on sale. Do you guys have any idea why that is??
I have the same rifle, although mounted in a KRG Whiskey-3 chassis. Just got it recently, and have been trying lots of loads/bullets with it. Best results so far are with SMK's. Still working on the 60+ grain bullets. I can't find any of the 62 SMK's either. Found some 69gr SMK's the other day. Haven't tried any of them yet. Anyway, good luck with your load development.

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I loaded some 69gr RMR bullets recently in front of a stout load of Shooters World AR Plus and was ringing steel very well out to 600yrds, A friend and I split a 1000 to try out, I don't remember what powder he used but they shot well also. My previous load was with a Hornady 62gr and the RMR shot as well or better.
 
Certainly I'm no market analyst, but it truly seems that Hornady has been far and away more available than Sierra for some years now. Good stuff tho, and I kinda fell into using it to develop loads simply because my preferred brand was not available.
 
I’ve given up on finding Sierra pistol bullets and moved on 2-3 years ago
 
Hornandy doesn't;

Hornady, indeed, does carry multiple military and federal law enforcement ammunition contracts.

Of note, Sierra operates out of 80,000 sq.ft. in Missouri. Hornady operates out of 150,000 sq.ft. in Nebraska. Acknowledging, in fairness, that Hornady is also manufacturing primers and cases in this space, while Sierra is just making bullets.

I don't have a dog in the fight, I shoot Hornady bullets for some cartridges, I shoot Sierra bullets for others. I've been a Sierra fan for much longer (I wear a Sierra hat every day), and I've sent countless SMK's downrange after paper, steel, and game for 30+ years. But Hornady is making a buttload of bullets at cheap prices, and making sure they keep inventory flowing. But why one company has product on the shelves and another doesn't, eh, life's a little more complicated than just two bullets...
 
I've been trying to build a load for my Tikka T3X Super Varmint .223 and the 62gr Sierra bullet is highly recommended. I have had great difficulty finding this bullet. Sierra keeps promising me they will run them, but end up postponing the run. I've tried some Nosler but they are flat bottom and not that easy to seat. Oddly, Hornady seems to have every variety of .224 bullet imaginable, even having them on sale. Do you guys have any idea why that is??

It seems like you’re really looking for a BTSP or something with a boat tail that will violently fragment. Midway, Natchez, and many other sites will let you filter for this so you can try what’s in stock. Then sign up for notifications on the Sierra’s so you can get some as soon as they come in.
 
I've shot mostly Sierra and Nosler bullets. The Sierra bullets have been consistently more accurate and effective for my targets of choice. Nosler bullets have been good, just not quite a good as Sierra. I'm a prairie dog shooter, mostly with .204, .223, 22Hornet. My Rem 700 VSF .223 has been deadly with 50 and 55gr Sierra BKs; with 1:12" twist. I bought the Tikka T3X Super Varmint .223 with1:8" twist to accommodate heavier bullets that will hold stability over longer distances; hence the search for 62 gr bullets. Friends of mine shoot long distance competitions and swear by 62 gr bullets through 1:8" barrels. All this brings me to why I search for Sierra 62gr.
Maybe Hornady would be just as good, but I would prefer to shoot what has worked in the past. As we say, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." Plus, all of you guys know what an ordeal it is to start the process of loading a new bullet experimentally with different loads, powders, etc.
 
It seems like you’re really looking for a BTSP or something with a boat tail that will violently fragment. Midway, Natchez, and many other sites will let you filter for this so you can try what’s in stock. Then sign up for notifications on the Sierra’s so you can get some as soon as they come in.
I'll give that a try. Thanks for the tip.
 
The Sierra bullets have been consistently more accurate and effective for my targets of choice. Nosler bullets have been good, just not quite a good as Sierra.

That's my experience as well. Noslers are good, but Sierras... and particularly the SMK... is just a wee bit better. Hornady, for me, ranks 3rd.

The one caveat to that is Hornady's 55grn and 62grn .224" bullets, which are very, very good, although I don't know that I ever had a 5.56mm Hornady vs Sierra shootout.
 
What flavor of long distance competitions are they shooting?
I don't really know the difference between one type of competition and another. My friends who do participate in long distance competitions like the Sierra 62, but they shoot other brands too. I tried a Barnes bullet, but it wasn't an improvement.
 
I've put lots of Nosler, Sierra and Hornady bullets of various flavors downrange in many different firearms, and have no real deep seated preference. I used more Noslers when I was competing because I bought a lot of .224" 69 and 77 grain Nosler Custom Competitions when I found them in bulk as seconds.

As for your search for 62-grain Sierras specifically, what is YOUR use for it? The only bullet I see on Sierra's webpage matching that description at the moment is the 62-grain Gameking SPBT, which is out of stock. If your friends are shooting steel and paper past 200 yards, I can think of 4 or 5 .224" bullets I've personally used that will hold up to wind better. And I stopped shooting Highpower 10-12 years ago, so there are probably other options available now.

The beauty of your new Tikka with a 1-8" twist barrel is you can use any commonly available .224" bullet that's suitable for loading at magazine length, and a few that require seating longer. Don't think you have to only use heavier bullets because of the twist rate; I'd be very, very surprised if you can't squeeze excellent accuracy out of any bullet from 50-grains to 77-grains, unless Tikka has a reputation for picky barrels.
 
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