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Working up a 9mm load with Titegroup

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by primalmu, Jan 19, 2013.

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  1. primalmu

    primalmu Member

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    I know, Titegroup isn't the best powder for a new reloader due to its narrow window of safe loads, however that's what I've got right now. I'm looking to work up a somewhat light load using Berry's 124gr RN bullets.

    I just loaded up 70 rounds of 9mm, loading 10 rounds at with each charge. I started at 3.6gr Titegroup and moved up 0.1gr to 4.2gr. 4.4gr is the max load listed by Hodgdon for a 125gr FMJ so I may or may not even test the 4.1gr and 4.2gr charges.

    As far as I understand it, as long as my gun cycles I should be good to go, correct? I'm looking for a low recoil load for plinking so I'm not too concerned about ballistic performance.
     
  2. Fire_Moose

    Fire_Moose Member

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    Try 3.3gr then....if your gun is not sprung too heavy...gots a 15# in mine and works great.

    How often did you weigh the powder drops? If often, the 4.1/.2 should be fine (used listed oal?) But you wont like them for what you're after.


    useless signiture
     
  3. bds

    bds Member

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    I have used Berry's regular plated bullets (flat base) with good results using lead load data. I have used HBRN-TP bullets (hollow base, thick plate) with very good accuracy using lead/jacketed load data.

    1.135" OAL was used for this testing with Berry's 124 gr HBRN-TP and Titegroup - http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?p=7266869#post7266869
    [​IMG]
     
  4. primalmu

    primalmu Member

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    I weighed every charge this time. Once I get a load that I know works I'll make a custom powder scoop that should get me to +/- 0.1gr of my ideal charge (I'm not going to choose something close to max loads so this variation shouldn't be a problem).
     
  5. primalmu

    primalmu Member

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    Went out today and tested my loads. They all shot great, and I think I'm going to aim for an average of 3.8gr. Anything over 3.9gr was getting a bit snappy for what I'm aiming for.
     
  6. rfwobbly

    rfwobbly Member

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    Using "Tite Group" and "powder scoop" in the same sentence is a bit like using "Obama" and "modest" together.

    :D
     
  7. primalmu

    primalmu Member

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    Haha, well surprisingly I can keep the charge within +/- 0.2gr using a scoop. I ground down a used 9mm case to hold 3.8gr. Once I get more experience I'm sure that will improve.
     
  8. rfwobbly

    rfwobbly Member

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    But sir, since the load window for Tite Group with 124gr bullets is only 0.4gr wide (3.8 to 4.2gr by Lyman), you are therefore forced to adopt the load at the very center, or 4.0gr. This because with a scoop that is only accurate to 0.2gr you could end up with loads varying all the way from 3.8gr (at the lowest) to as high as 4.2gr (at the highest). That exactly what +/-0.2gr means.

    And therein lies the problem with scoops. If you want to load Tite Group, then you need to invest in a really good powder measure that can hold closer to 0.05gr, or 4x more accurate than the scoop.

    ;)
     
  9. Ex

    Ex Member

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    This is exactly correct! Titegroup is an economical powder that give pretty fair performance on light projectiles. However, it is not very forgiving, being that it has a fairly narrow range on load weight. Guesstimating plus or minus 2/10gn is a very risky business. You need an accurate scale. I

    If you were using a powder like LongShot that gives you a wider range, you might be closer to being safe. Unique is another powder that is a little more forgiving. Yes, the TiteGroup will work. It's not a powder that I would recommend to new reloaders.
    And again, please get yourself a scale.
     
  10. mizer67

    mizer67 Member

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    4.0 or 4.1 gr TG @ 1.135 OAL with a 124 FMJ should run any gun and be safe.
     
  11. primalmu

    primalmu Member

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    Well, Lyman might list that data, but I got my data directly from Hodgdon. For a 125gr FMJ they list a window of 4.1-4.4gr. For a 125gr lead bullet they list 3.6-4.0, which interestingly enough is right in line with what I tested today. In this case I'll trust the powder's manufacturer over the Lyman manual (and the fact that none of my cases showed any pressure signs).
     
  12. Ex

    Ex Member

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    Agreed on the websight for most current data. The manuals will show you other data about case specs etc that are also important.
     
  13. primalmu

    primalmu Member

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    I do have the Hornady manual for case spec info, etc.
     
  14. Ex

    Ex Member

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    I might also mention that since your starting loads were certainly on the low side... be very aware of each round. A squib can still make noise ...

    Might I ask as to what 9mm pistol you will be firing these from?
     
  15. primalmu

    primalmu Member

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    A CZ 75BD. I was very conscious of making sure each bullet actually left the barrel. Luckily, the ground was very wet and it was VERY obvious that the bullets were being fired. Not to mention those 2 liter bottles on the berm... ;)
     
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