Auto_loader with hammer Question

74man

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I have noticed that most every picture I see of a 1911 the hammer is back. Why is this? Does this have something to do with the Safety? I have never had an auto loader like a 1911 but I do have a Springfield XD in .40 cal. My XD I keep a snap cap installed to limit the amount of tension I leave on the springs. Can you explain to me why the Pictures I see, have the hammer back in the cocked position? Thanks
 
Condition 1 is typically where a gun sits when it’s ready to be fired and used defensively, but is also a safe way to carry the firearm.

For DA/SA guns with a decocker only that’s with the hammer forward, and the same goes for revolvers. I don’t know of anyone who carried a revolver in single-action mode, or a DA/SA with the hammer back without a safety in place.

With a DA/SA gun with a safety like the CZ-75 or Beretta 92FS you can carry in Condition 1 without issue.

The 1911 is the perfect example of a weapon that can achieve a perfect Condition 1 existence.
 
The 1911 is a single action only (SAO) pistol. If the hammer is down it cannot be fired by pulling the trigger so you would have to rack the slide to cock the hammer and fire it.
This takes way too much time in a defensive situation.
The 1911 has two safeties, one on the grip so it can only be fired when it is firmly grasped. It also has a thumb actuated manual safety lever which must be released to be able to fire.
Most who carry a 1911 consider condition 1 the safe and preferred way to carry.
 
It must be for picture taking. I see no reason to keep one cocked to store. Mine all have the hammer all the way down on an empty chamber when in storage. It's give no problem at all since 1975 when I bought my first 1911. The military gun is easily cocked with the hammer but it takes little time away when in the danger zone. Bobbed hammer are a pain at least for me. If I were to carry one for self defense it would be in condition 1 and have done so in the past. Depressing the safety takes no time away as it's done on the draw. Practice until your brain remembers to tell you muscles what to do automatically.
 
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I’m sure it’s for show. I too carry my 1911s cocked and locked but hammer down on an empty chamber when in the safe. Also, no need to store your XD with a snap cap in the “fired” state; it’s neither helping nor hurting the springs.
 
I see no reason to keep one cocked to store.
Storing it cocked has no adverse effect on the main spring, one could argue there's no reason to store one hammer-down either.

Cycles are what wear out springs, not constant tension.

FYI I don't currently own any 1911s, but I store my Hi-Powers cocked & locked, including one from World War II.
 
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It's interesting to watch media with characters who point 1911-style pistols with the hammer visibly down.
I have never had an auto loader like a 1911
74man, you sound a little mystified about safe function of your pistol. Most of us fumbled through our early years shooting, and are thankful for not putting an unscheduled hole in something.
Don't hesitate to find some training, if you are uncertain of safe handling.
Don't hesitate to keep asking questions here as well. :)
Moon
 
I have noticed that most every picture I see of a 1911 the hammer is back. Why is this?
I would question your premise. I see plenty of pictures of 1911's with the hammer down. And that's the way I have the hammer when I take pictures of my own guns.
 
I carried a Colt Govt. in condition 1 every working day for several years. So cocked and locked just seems natural to me. Every time I see someone in the movies or on TV running around in some dangerous situation with a 1911 type pistol, hammer down; I can't help but shake my head. The writers, producers, directors and actors don't know if the hammer is supposed to be up, down or sideways and don't care. Only 1911 guys care;)
 
I always cringe when I watch a movie where the actor is pointing an un-cocked (hammer down) 1911 at others.
Or Beretta 1934/1935 or so many other examples. One surprising example is seeing a Savage 1907 with hammer down when it's not a hammer, it's a striker fired pistol and it takes a Mungo or a Donk rather than a Sid Caesar to cock the striker using the 'hammer'.
 
Storing it cocked has no adverse effect on the main spring, one could argue there's no reason to store one hammer-down either.

Cycles are what wear out springs, not constant tension.

FYI I don't currently own any 1911s, but I store my Hi-Powers cocked & locked, including one from World War II.

Quite true about the springs. I lower the hammers on everything when put away to gain a tiny bit of space which I am about out of plus it's a habit I formed long ago.
 
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I have noticed that most every picture I see of a 1911 the hammer is back. Why is this? Does this have something to do with the Safety? I have never had an auto loader like a 1911 but I do have a Springfield XD in .40 cal. My XD I keep a snap cap installed to limit the amount of tension I leave on the springs. Can you explain to me why the Pictures I see, have the hammer back in the cocked position? Thanks
A 1911 is much like your XD.

When you rack the slide to chamber a round in your XD, you cock the striker, you just can't see that it's cocked, but it is. When you rack the slide of a 1911 to chamber a round it cocks the hammer, which you can see.

Also like your XD, where you can't pull the trigger to get the gun to fire without the striker being cocked, you can't pull the trigger on the 1911 and get the gun to fire unless the hammer is cocked.
 
One surprising example is seeing a Savage 1907 with hammer down when it's not a hammer, it's a striker fired pistol and it takes a Mungo or a Donk rather than a Sid Caesar to cock the striker using the 'hammer'.
Technically, these are generally called a '1910', even though the original patent was '07. But your point is well taken...what's more, if the hammer is down/striker is forward, it's not inertial, it's resting on the primer. Jar, where did you see this, uh, 'misuse' of the Savage? Wow.
Moon
 
Technically, these are generally called a '1910', even though the original patent was '07. But your point is well taken...what's more, if the hammer is down/striker is forward, it's not inertial, it's resting on the primer. Jar, where did you see this, uh, 'misuse' of the Savage? Wow.
Moon
Cheap Detective. Sid Ceasar as old man in wheelchair.
 
Cheap Detective. Sid Ceasar as old man in wheelchair.
BTW, never tried to thumb cock a '10, until we had this conversation. I've a '10 and a '17, and they are perfect bears to thumb cock...holy (redacted)!
Moon
 
The 1911 is a single action only (SAO) pistol.
A 1911 is Single Action, not "SAO".

"SAO" is Fudd terminology.

An SA trigger mechanism has no other mode of operation, but a DA trigger does, which is why a DA trigger mechanism that has had its SA mode disabled is called DAO, because it operates in DA mode "Only".

XXXXXX

In addition, and unrelated to Avatar's post, the manual safety of a 1911 cannot be engaged unless the hammer is cocked.
 
A 1911 is Single Action, not "SAO".

"SAO" is Fudd terminology.
I don't know that it is actually "Fudd" terminology--not every misused firearm term calls for disparagement of those who use it. It is true that it's almost always redundant to add the 'O' to 'SA'. One might argue that it's a retronym, but I think it's more accurate to just say that the 'O' is almost always unnecessary. The only time I think it might be possible to argue that the term is applicable would be when an SA/DA autopistol is fitted with parts to disable the DA function. Then it could be used to clarify that a handgun that would normally be DA/SA is now SAO. But that's admittedly a pretty unusual situation.
 
Then it could be used to clarify that a handgun that would normally be DA/SA is now SAO. But that's admittedly a pretty unusual situation.
The only one I've handled was the S&W M-14 SAO that was meant for Bullseye competition. One currently in production is the Chiappa Rhino SAR models

"SAO" is Fudd terminology.
The term is officially accepted in the industry as the opposite of DAO.

SIG and Beretta use that official designation for their pistols to differentiate them from models which are also available in DA/SA configuration
 
The term is officially accepted in the industry as the opposite of DAO.

SIG and Beretta use that official designation for their pistols to differentiate them from models which are also available in DA/SA configuration
+1

Right from Sig's website:

"The P226 Legion RX SAO variant brings the same feature set to the table in a single-action only package. The addition of the SIG Custom Works Flat Trigger provides an exceptional feel and consistent trigger pull regardless of finger placement. The SAO is available in 9mm.
 
Doing my best to suspend disbelief of the actor pointing a hammer down 1911 in a movie, I think to myself he could using a Para Ordnance LDA 1911.
 
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