Broken Gun Club- new member

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by igotta40, Oct 22, 2020.

  1. jwamplerusa

    jwamplerusa Member

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    Listen to Gunny, and get on YouTube and go to the Anvil channel and watch some of his stock repair videos.
     
  2. Ivy Mike

    Ivy Mike Member

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    I've fixed a couple things with Gorilla Glue but for wood, I like actual wood glue. Gorilla makes a wood glue that seems to be pretty good. There are a couple other options for clamping a fix like that. A large enough hose clamp(s) would fit on and could be tightened down to squeeze the break really tightly. I've used that to reglue scarf joint on guitar necks. Cut a piece of bicycle innertube to protect the wood, slip the clamp(s) on over the innertube and wrench em down for an hour. They work great on the rounded back of the neck and you can use a clamping caul. I have a few pieces of wood closet rod cut in half that act as perfect semi-circle cauls. The hose clamp really gets a solid purchase.
    If you wipe a little car wax on the inside of the innertube, glue doesn't stick to it and makes cleanup a whole lot quicker.

    Like any finish work, your hardest task is the prep. The longer you spend picking out little splinters that won't go together correctly, mocking up your joint, precisely locating dowel pins if you intend to use them, etc. will make it much easier to correct the finish when you're done.

    Truth be told, I'd like to take a run at the stock to see if I can fix it satisfactorily. Maybe I'll go drop one of my rifles to see if I can have a new project. I'd do it to the Mosin, but I think it might kick me back.
     
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  3. igotta40

    igotta40 Member

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    These are great replies and tips, thanks! Keep em coming!
     
  4. igotta40

    igotta40 Member

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    Wow Gunny I appreciate your offer- and I’ll probably follow up with you. I’m not in a rush or anything, so a few months is no problem.
     
  5. Sooner1911

    Sooner1911 Member

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    First, I am so sorry. I have a Beretta 687 28 gauge that fell off a cart at a sporting clays tourney that broke pretty much the same way. It was put together with two small metal pins (1/16th or 1/32nd) and glue a couple of years before I bought it and I have owned it for about 8 years. It is still going strong. You can see the break if you really look for it, but the spare buttstock I bought is still in the box. If you can find some videos online I can speak to the strength of the fix. I have won more trophies with that gun than any other and unless it falls off another cart, I cannot see it breaking again. Good luck, that maple is beautiful.

    Regards,

    Kris
     
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  6. igotta40

    igotta40 Member

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    I can’t let it get to me- it’s merely a possession. Bwahahahaha but it was my nicest rifle!!
     
  7. Carl N. Brown

    Carl N. Brown Member

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    Ivy Mike: don't think about it.

    Drop Mosin on floor, Mosin break floor before floor break Mosin.
     
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  8. Bill M.

    Bill M. Member

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    Do not use gorilla glue. The best choice for that break is a good epoxy. A good wood glue like Titebond 3 will also work well. The important thing if it is a do it yourself is the clamping. You need to be able to clamp it accurately and close the joint completely. You will need to make jigs to do that. I think a good workman could make that repair very near invisible.
     
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  9. doubleh

    doubleh Member

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    I just glued up some walnut to make a bench rest favorable forearm for a G2 contender rifle earlier this week. To get the width I wanted I used two pieces of 3/4" and one piece of 1/4" wood in between the thicker pieces. I trued them up in the mill, drilled holes for two blind dowels, and glued everything together with gorilla glue using six clamps on a slightly over ten inch long project. When it was dry I made a very light pass with a face mill on both sides to remove the foamy squeeze out. The only way you could tell the piece had been glued was the slightly different color of the 1/4" piece of wood and a slight change in the grain. The overall color was slightly lighter than the stock I wanted to match so it got dyed with Fiebing's light brown oil dye after final shaping and the color difference is no longer visible. I need to get out to the garage and spray a coat of poly on it now that the dye is dry to start the finishing process.

    Gorilla has a new clear gel glue that competes with goop and shoe-goo. It's more expensive but testing it I have found it's stronger and it glues a wide variety of different substances. I'm NOT suggesting it be used on this stock repair, just putting the information forward for those that don't know about it.

    On another note, anyone have any suggestions on repairing a broken nylon 66 stock? The same thing that broke the stock in the OP got this one. Remington claimed they were unbreakable and had an ad showing a vehicle parked on top of the rifle with a bow in it to prove their point when the rifles were new. I can't blame Remington as they had no knowlege of how age would affect that type of nylon..
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2020
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  10. hps1

    hps1 Member

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    Threading brass brazing rods of various size makes great pins for reinforcing weak points or repairing stocks. But personally, I'd wait for Gunny on that one, you don't have much wood on top/front half of your pistol grip. Would be real easy to drive the pins too deep unless you don't mind ends being visible. :)
    50525256987_ebb933d8c8.jpg

    Regards,
    hps
     
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  11. theotherwaldo

    theotherwaldo Member

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    Most water-based glues have a fairly short lifespan, both in the bottle and in the joint.
    I'd say, go with a pro like Gunny... .
     
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  12. MJD

    MJD Member

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    I've repaired two using 2 part epoxy and a metal rod....both breaks exactly where yours was.

    Gorgeous stock. My skill level is enough to get it straight and the repair only somewhat noticeable. Some of Gunny's repairs he's shown have been unbelievable.

    Personally, I'd get another stock just to have in case of emergency, and make a run on repairing this one. Patience, slow moving (until you mix the epoxy :) ), and an eye for the small details will help you out here.
     
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  13. JTHunter

    JTHunter Member

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    igotta40 - hps1 beat me to it with the brass brazing rods as I was going to recommend brass screws and not steel ones.
    Many years ago, an old Stevens SxS shotgun cracked both sides of the waist directly behind the receiver. After removing the stock (LONG screw under buttpad), I drilled 2 holes (one on each side) down into the cracked areas. I took a small flat-blade screwdriver and smeared yellow wood glue into the cracks and the drilled holes. When the round-head brass screws were tightened gently, they pulled the cracks together and squeezed out the excess glue. I took dampened Q-tips to wipe the excess off from the inside of the stock and a damp rag on the outside. The stock was allowed to dry for 2 days before I re-assembled it. The recessed holes the brass screws were in on the top of the stock were filled with something called "PlasticWood" to seal those brass screws in completely. After it had cured, I stained the two spots that were about 1/4" in diameter. While they can be seen, in over 25 years of use, they have failed or broken again. That is despite sometimes firing both 12 ga. barrels at the same time for a heck of a kick.
    Good luck.
     
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  14. hps1

    hps1 Member

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    [​IMG]

    A closer look at OP's stock picture it appears that it might be possible to remove grip cap and, holding the two halves in place, see if a small hole could be drilled from rear of grip that would exit under the receiver tang so that both entrance and exit holes would be covered by receiver and grip cap. If this is the case, the hole could be enlarged to take a larger brass screw w/head countersunk below grip cap, then used to pull the crack shut after glue applied. Hard to tell with the two halves separated as they are, but worth a closer look.

    Regards,
    hps
     
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  15. igotta40

    igotta40 Member

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    I really appreciate all the advice and suggestions. A repair is at the top of my list of options.
     
  16. Lennyjoe

    Lennyjoe Member

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