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Bump in the night belt

Discussion in 'Strategies, Tactics and Training' started by Balrog, Jul 4, 2018.

  1. jeepnik

    jeepnik Member

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    Nope, the current one is red and black checked. But, it's warm and the dark colors do make me harder to see. I do have "tactical" slippers. You know the type with fleece lining and a hard sole.
     
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  2. RPZ

    RPZ Member

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    Darn, you beat me to it, but I did contemplate tactical slippers too.
     
  3. Rexster

    Rexster Member

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    Safariland buckle-less duty belt. Safariland 6360 holster. Safariland mag pouches. No longer LEO-ing, due to retirement, but the rig is still kept in a handy place. If there is time to don the rig, some aspects of an encounter become simpler and easier.

    No handcuff pouch. The moment of applying restraints is the most-perilous moment, the most-likely time for the opponent to make his move. Plus, if I do apply those restraints, I become instantly responsible for his continued well-being. Several of my colleagues were gifted with most of my handcuffs, after I retired. I do have Plan A, B, C, etc, for a downed opponent, but will not say it here, in a publicly-viewable forum.
     
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  4. Elkins45

    Elkins45 Member

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    If you wear tactical underwear you don’t need a tactical robe.
     
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  5. RPZ

    RPZ Member

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    Alright, I confess - for 8 months in the year in Texas it might more likely be tactical underwear.
     
  6. Don Dayacetah

    Don Dayacetah Member

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    I see a market niche. Tactical Tranquilizers. Dang, you guys are wound up like you live in Beirut. Take this from somebody who
    sleeps with a gun under an adjacent pillow IN THE BED, rather than on the nightstand. Crank it down about a thousand.
    It's really not healthy to live like this.
     
  7. Kleanbore

    Kleanbore Moderator

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    Where is it when you are not in bed?
     
  8. Don Dayacetah

    Don Dayacetah Member

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    Is the question "Do I EDC?" ? Yes. But maybe the question, not that it has much to do with the topic, should be "HOW do you EDC?"
    or "WHY do you EDC?" or "Where are THEY, when you're not in bed?". The sad fact is many of us face a higher chance of having a AD/ND running around like Joe Craptical than
    EVER running into a bad guy. So I'll answer your question with another question:

    Is risking shooting yourself, while trying to "defend" yourself, or ruining your health by being so wound up with paranoia any way to live? Have a Margarita, get a massage,
    relax, breathe.
     
  9. Old Dog

    Old Dog Member

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    Not seeing any wound-up guys in this thread. What thread are your reading? A fairly civil discussion regarding common-sense precautions.

    Burglaries, break-ins and home invasions are pretty common in my region. Locally, another robber bit the dust last week when he picked the wrong 82-year-old woman's house to break in to ... She probably was wearing her tactical robe.
     
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  10. Don Dayacetah

    Don Dayacetah Member

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    You should move.
     
  11. hdwhit

    hdwhit Member

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    Yes.

    I put together a military-style pistol belt with load carrying suspenders that lives on the back of a chair in the bedroom. I first put to together when I was 17, but have updated it over the years (not the least changing out the pistol belt as my waist size grew).

    It currently contains:
    • Ammo pouch with two 30 round magazines loaded with 25 rounds of .223 Remington, each.
    • Holster for 38 Special snub nose pistol.
    • Knife in self-designed pull-down scabbard.
    • LED Flashlight.
    • First Aid supplies.
     
  12. hdwhit

    hdwhit Member

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    Quite correct.

    I have posted this previously, but will post it again. Starting in World War I, the army conducted trials in which grease was intentionally deposited in the rifles of soldiers going into combat. Observers followed the trial units into battle. After action, the barrels of the soldiers' rifles were inspected and the observers reported on what they observed. In round numbers, one-quarter (25%) of soldiers did not fire their weapon at all. Of those that did fire, one-third (one-quarter of the original total) were observed firing their weapons into the dirt in front of them or at angles well above the enemy's head. Thus, only about half of the soldiers were actually firing at the enemy.

    These tests were repeated in World War II, Korea and Vietnam and the results were substantially the same.

    Now, if only half the number of trained soldiers, in combat, were firing for effect, how can we expect untrained or minimally trained (a one-day CHL course maybe followed by a weekend-practical course) personnel to do any better?

    Not only will they hesitate, nearly a century of studies with trained soldiers prove that half the people won't even shoot or if they shoot won't shoot to kill.
     
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  13. RPZ

    RPZ Member

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    Now I like this one.

    Your priority item A is my preference also, ie: my default preference is a rifle. B, the snub is the fastest (imo) to get into action if needed and can easily be employed in a hands on skirmish strong or weak hand. And item C the knife, is also fast in the pull down attitude.

    I'm voting this one "thread winner".

    At which "hour" on the belt is the snub?
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2018
  14. MedWheeler

    MedWheeler Member

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    hdwhit writes:

    Definitely been there.. :D
     
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  15. Water Garden

    Water Garden Member

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    I have a pistol and a flashlight in the night stand as well as a shotgun mounted behind the bedroom curtains.. that's it. I am not going to "Rambo-up" with gear, rigs , a helmet or nightvison goggles in an effort to ready myself to answer a bump in the night. I live rural and it is conceivable that I may get a call from family in the middle of the night to come and answer some sort of problem at one of the nearby homesteads ( medical, wild animals, trespassers, prowlers or poachers). It is that reason that I do keep a monsoon sling bag at the ready so that I can toss items in it quickly and go out the door. The only gear that I have "staged" is my emergency bag( bug bag) or whatever people like to call it... I keep it in the trunk.
     
    Don Dayacetah likes this.
  16. Kleanbore

    Kleanbore Moderator

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    First, we have to ask why we assume that the "bump" will happen "in the night".
     
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  17. labnoti

    labnoti Member

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    Those studies were fabricated ********. It is true that SLA Marshal made those claims and that his theory was widely accepted and perpetuated by Grossman, but it turned out to be a crock.

    There may be some merit to the idea that most of the US population resists killing another human, and there could be a lot of evidence identified that indicates what I would describe as reluctance. While that idea of reluctance may be very relevant to non-combatant civilians in self-defense scenarios, it is only a healthy rationale. On the other hand, it seems quite plausible that soldiers can relatively easily be initiated as very efficient killers. Marshal and Grossman's work has been debunked as any kind of counterpoint.
     
  18. RPZ

    RPZ Member

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    Very many home invasions happen in the daytime.

    Morning, afternoon, evening, not all family might be at home. Those that are might be anywhere in the house or outside.

    Of course in this scenario the alarm isn't set up, and the first clue might be a sudden face to face with a badguy. Or it might be seeing a strange car at the roadside. A family member screaming. No telling.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2018
  19. Ramdog

    Ramdog Member

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    P97 and two mags, flashlight , phone : that's all the Rambo kit ! Keep it simpal. Bump in the day or night !
     
  20. The Evangelist Cowboy

    The Evangelist Cowboy Member

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    Not exactly a "belt" but I keep my 586 with two speed loaders in its shoulder holster over my headboard next to where I sleep, It gets wiped down every few days with a silicone rag.
     
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  21. jeepnik

    jeepnik Member

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    I can't speak to WWI or WWII or Korea. But, based on my admittedly limited experience in that little fracas in South East Asia, the only ones that weren't firing their weapons weren't able to. And, no I can't speak about where those rounds went, as I was just a bit busy.

    This last bit leads me to believe that no one in a combat zone is going to stick their head up and look to see if the guy on his right or left (pretty darn hard to see any farther) is shooting the ground or the sky.

    Like I say, I have limited experience, maybe I'm wrong. Any of the stone cold Seal Team Six members here have better input.
     
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  22. Vern Humphrey

    Vern Humphrey Member

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    Actually, it was SLA Marshall (in inverterate liar) who claimed to have discovered that about half the men in combat didn't fire. If that's true, what happened to all that ammunition we burned up?
     
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  23. jeepnik

    jeepnik Member

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    Falls right in with one of my favorite quotes. “There are three types of lies. Lies, damned lies and statistics.”
     
  24. Vern Humphrey

    Vern Humphrey Member

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    Marshall used to claim, for example, he was the youngest Second Lieutenant in WWI -- but the Army records show he wasn't commissioned until the 1920s. Someone would shut him up with the evidence, and a couple of years later he'd start up again.

    I think he was Nature's first abortive attempt to create Bill Clinton.
     
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  25. FL-NC

    FL-NC Member

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    I've never been in a gunfight outside of the military. What I saw in the military (I only served in specialized units) in combat- and I'm only speaking of the US personnel that were there, and not "friendly indigenous troops" was probably atypical as compared to other units. When working at close quarters, typically in structures and often in an urban setting, I saw the methodical, highly drilled tactics of shooting, moving, and communicating being performed in the same way that we trained, and trained, and trained. Were their errors and hiccups? Absolutely. However, when the distance to the enemy increased (such as an engagement in the desert) less experienced team members would sometimes not be as quick on the trigger. This was probably due to a number of reasons.
     
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