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Colt Revolver Improvements

Discussion in 'Handguns: Revolvers' started by Kleanbore, Mar 20, 2020.

  1. Kleanbore

    Kleanbore Moderator Staff Member

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    I posed this question earlier. The answer has since appeared in the latest American Rifleman magazine.

    The question was about whether the new Python is subject to the same problems RE: wear-related cylinder timing and lock-up problems as the old.

    There is a good discussion of that issue with a Colt rep. Ans: No. There has been a design change.

    Can anyone say anything about that issue regarding the new Cobra and King Cobra?
     
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  2. ArchAngelCD

    ArchAngelCD Member

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    I have read every Colt revolver that will be re-released has gone through design changes to eliminate older design flaws. The are truly new revolvers that look like the older ones. Good on Colt if true. (And I feel it's true)
     
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  3. ColtPythonElite

    ColtPythonElite Member

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    What are the design flaws of the older guns?
     
  4. AustinTX

    AustinTX Member

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    Is the hand no longer tensioned against the ratchet at the moment of firing? Hard for me to see how the original Python’s particular wear-related timing issues can be eliminated if the old “bank vault lockup” has been preserved.
     
  5. Kleanbore

    Kleanbore Moderator Staff Member

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    Read the article.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2020
  6. AustinTX

    AustinTX Member

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    No access to it for a few days. (Unless it’s also online, but I don’t believe it is.)
     
  7. Old Dog

    Old Dog Member

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    I can say that I've shot a few hundred hot rounds through both my Cobras and my King Cobra, and the timing and lock-up on all of 'em is still impeccable. Whole lotta plus-P .38s and full-house magnums, and they're still as tight and reliable as they were out of the box. One of the reasons I've been so anxiously awaiting a new Python is because of just how good these revolvers are -- and the triggers are superb.
    zzzcolts.jpg
     
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  8. Heir Kommt Die Sonne

    Heir Kommt Die Sonne Member

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    I want the new Colt Night Cobra too much for my own good.
     
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  9. CajunBass

    CajunBass Member

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    AustinTX and Walkalong like this.
  10. Kleanbore

    Kleanbore Moderator Staff Member

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    The factory recommended service interval for Colt's older steel-frame revolvers was 2-3,000 rounds, and for the aluminum Cobra was 1,000. They don't provide the service any more, and there are very few smiths who can do it.

    That would indicate against shooting them very much today.

    The problem was the design of the cylinder stop mechanism.

    The new Python has a cylinder lock-up design that is more like a S&W.

    The new Cobra and King Cobra revolvers are new designs, but I cannot tell from photos how the cylinder is locked. I can find no mention of it in articles.

    Anyone?
     
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  11. Barry loyd

    Barry loyd Member

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    They have a cylinder stop much like the Smith now.
     
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  12. Kleanbore

    Kleanbore Moderator Staff Member

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    Can you provide a better explanation?
     
  13. Barry loyd

    Barry loyd Member

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    7D2907D0-0F09-400A-8B80-8FF478219E14.jpeg The cylinder stop looks similar to a Smith and is operated by the trigger.
     
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  14. boom boom
    • Contributing Member

    boom boom Moderator Staff Member

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    The new Colt Python (dunno about Cobras) also have a different geometry for the mainspring to reduce the stacking that the old V spring would get close to firing. From what I've read, stacking is not an issue with the new ones. Gunsmiths (do not try at home) figured out a way to kink the mainspring so as to keep good function but eliminate stacking near the end of the trigger stroke.
     
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  15. Old Dog

    Old Dog Member

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    Yeah, actually watched an episode of "American Rifleman" (the tv show) on one of the outdoor channels, Paul Spitale of Colt gave a great explanation of the new mechanics, and Ed Head from Gunsite demonstrated the trigger pull. If you saw that particular episode, I know you decided you wanted one of the new Pythons ...
     
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  16. 9mmepiphany

    9mmepiphany Moderator Staff Member

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    That was the standard Python tuning trick...back in the day
     
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  17. Dframe

    Dframe Member

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    It was indeed. It was also the cause of a lot of damaged main springs when bubba thought he could do it.
     
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  18. Zendude
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    Zendude Contributing Member

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    Can you tell if the hand is engaged with the cylinder when it fires?
     
  19. Barry loyd

    Barry loyd Member

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    I think it does. I’ll check when I get home.
     
  20. 9mmepiphany

    9mmepiphany Moderator Staff Member

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    The tight upward pressure on the hand engaging the cylinder at the point of ignition always took most of the stress that cause the action to "loosen"
     
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  21. AustinTX

    AustinTX Member

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    That's the question I asked earlier. Unfortunately, the AH article doesn't answer it.
     
  22. ACES&8S

    ACES&8S Member

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    The only problem I have ever had with the old Python was the weak double action, that happened to
    2 that I have had, it also happened to my old Diamondback.
    I would love to have one of the new ones if it came in the original BLU that was great, but I haven't seen
    such a creature yet.
    I would love to have one to run instead of fondle or hide away somewhere, the old ones are more like
    investments if they are in almost original condition.
    The new ones, I don't know yet. Can't believe the people who build them, they are salesmen & women.
    The ones that test them, well if they get to keep one or two, they might say what they should say.
    I jabber to much.
     
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  23. Slamfire

    Slamfire Member

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    Is the cylinder stop the only thing that causes the old Python from going out of time?

    Based on my experience the cylinder hand is very important for timing. It has a complex shape, and then, as the cylinder ratchet kicks back against it, it shortens. The ratchet has to stay extremely tight or timing gets off. The Colts locked up as the hammer fell, and slight wear in the mechanism, mostly hand and ratchet, were what I thought caused timing issues.

    I am glad Colt has brought out revolvers, and with modern CAD/CNC software they should be able to model stresses, deflections, compression within the lockworks. This was simply not possible before the 1990's. I really hope Colt did the design iterations, and the full scale tests, to make sure this variation is solid and long lasting.
     
  24. Kleanbore

    Kleanbore Moderator Staff Member

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    Those who have reviewed hem like them.

    Source? Do you distrust the work of women?

    Too much indeed. Think before posting. (Moderator hat on).
     
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  25. ACES&8S

    ACES&8S Member

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    Understood sir!
     
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