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Do you think there is gun-placement in movies?

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by bbaerst, Nov 17, 2004.

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  1. bbaerst

    bbaerst Member

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    Product placement has become absolutely huge in movies and other media in the past few decades, as I'm sure you're all aware. Having your corporate logo or product in a popular TV show or move is an incredible advertising oppurtunity to any corporation that sells to the public, and even without sales, product placement certainly heightens brand awareness and consumer perception.

    My question is that while although product placement is undoubtably huge for things such as sodas, cars, watches, and other common consumer items, I'm not quite sure about guns. Granted, guns are often portrayed in a negative light in movies--the use (in movies) of guns is almost always in some scene of violence (granted, sometimes heroism), and perhaps gun manufactures don't want that image associated with their products. However, some guns in movies have become very close to the character that uses them, and in no doubt rouse a huge interest from the public in those guns. Take for instance Dirty Harry, with his .44 magnum. I was watching a show on the history channel about magnum cartridges, and apparently that after that movie was released, the sales of the .44 magnum absolutely shot through the roof; everybody wanted Clint Eastwood's preferred revolver. Also, James Bond. Even those who don't even carry a slight interest in shooting or guns can probably tell you that Walther makes James Bond's sidearm of choice, and the Walther PPK (and I guess, more recently, the P99) is now almost always associated in non-gun circles with spies and government agents, regardless of its actual popularity with intelligence agencies.

    Anyway, I really think that placement of guns in movies, even if not actually paid for by Walther, Smith & Wesson, or what have you, is a huge source of sales for gun makers--especially those whom otherwise may not be known (Colt guns are famous because of their huge intertwining in American culture, however, Glocks probably generate a vast proportion of consumer attention through the media). Do you guys here think that product placement is very big with guns? If so, is it a good idea (I wouldn't want someone buying a Glock just because they want to be like Jason Bourne; I'd hope they'd actually take time to know how to use a gun and especially one as unique as a Glock...then again, that's what the laws are for)?
     
  2. orangeninja

    orangeninja Member

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    In a word....heck yes. I believe that "technical" instruction is provided as well as dummy guns for propps etc. Product placement in movies most definantly extends to guns.
     
  3. MrMurphy

    MrMurphy Member

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    The Tomb Raider movies and the Alien Vs Predator were quite literally H&K advertisements.
     
  4. bbaerst

    bbaerst Member

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    Well, that settles that! :)

    Considering that the H&K products featured (I think, at least) were G36s and other civilian-off-limits rifles, I wonder what H&K hoped to gain? Just positive consumer preception?
     
  5. LiquidTension

    LiquidTension Member

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    I dunno...how many people can actually identify different types of guns in movies? Other than people that are already into the sport, most of the population can't tell the difference between a Sig and an HK (or any other combination). THR members aside, the total audience that would pick up on such placement is pretty small. It's not like putting a bag of Doritos on screen. You'd have to ask the gun companies if it's worth the money to put their products in movies.

    So basically, I have no idea :rolleyes:
     
  6. Jim K

    Jim K Member

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    I agree with Tension. Not enough people will recognize the guns, and most makers don't really want "advertising" that shows their guns in the hands of the bad guys. Plus many movie guns are so "worked over" that they are almost unrecognizable anyway. (How many folks spotted the Sterlings and Lewis guns in Star Wars?)

    "Dirty Harry" was an exception since the character made much of the caliber and its power, and sales went through the roof. But I doubt any other movie gun use has had that kind of impact on sales.

    Jim
     
  7. Old Fud

    Old Fud Member

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    I believe I read a blurb about S&W just within this past week that spoke of a marketing drive to increase placement in Hollywood movies.
     
  8. g56

    g56 Member

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    There are several companies that rent guns for movies, they set up a package deal, real guns converted to blank only use, rubber dummies to use in stunt work, the blank ammo and the on site expert to manage and maintain them. There have been several stories on the various TV shooting shows about these, they have appeared numerous times on both American Shooter and Shooting Gallery.
     
  9. Preacherman

    Preacherman Member

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    Based on talking with some friends in the Hollywierd scene, it appears that the biggest factor in firearms selection is twofold:

    1. It must be BIG, so as to show up easily on screen;

    2. It must be appropriate to the period of the film - i.e old-fashioned looking, or waaay futuristic, or fantasy-like (i.e. the Mauser Broomhandles that got transmogrified into blasters in the Star Wars trilogy).

    Other than that, I don't know how much product placement plays a part in getting the "right" guns into movies.
     
  10. marklbucla

    marklbucla Member

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    Even though a huge % of the movie goers wouldn't know one gun from another, I'd think that it's worth it for the gun companies to pay to have their products placed in movies. The target audience for such advertisements would be able to tell the difference between a 1911, Sig, Glock, Beretta, etc. and would definitely be influenced in the same way that anyone watching any other sort of advertisement directed at them would be.

    That being said, I do own a 1911 and a Beretta, not because they're good in my hands (or even fit my hands), but because of the media advertising. I mean when it's Beretta this, 1911 that, over and over, how is one to resist!? :rolleyes:

    Besides, weren't there posts about this a few months ago?
     
  11. mnrivrat

    mnrivrat Member

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    I doubt that product placement plays any role in movie gun choices.

    The fact that some movies ,by pure chance , push the right consumer button would be completely out of the advertisers control. Merely having a Smith & Wesson armed dirty Harry did not push that button. The way the firearm was portayed in the movie was more the key.

    For Example: In the movie Jeremia Johnson the highlight was on the .50 caliber Hawkins rifle. The sales of .50 cal. muzzleloading rifles went up after the movie, but you could not relate that to a particular brand.
    I don't see the movies writing in particular buzz to advertise a specific gun company's product ,and not enough viewers would know the difference in brand to make a company fork out advertising dollars for such a hit/miss .

    When an actor drinks a coke, you can recognize it is a coke by color and label. Take a 100 people to a movie and find out how many of them recognize the type of firearm being used in a scene - and those that do recognize what it is have already been reached !
     
  12. Justin

    Justin Moderator Staff Member

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    Shooters aren't the only ones who will recognize a particular brand or model of firearm in a movie.

    As video games have become increasingly complex they have taken to using real-world gun designs, and most games tend to have at least something of a blurb about who made it and what its called.

    For example, look at how popular the Desert Eagle has become as a result of its placement in (ugh) Counterstrike.

    Same goes for other games, like the inclusion of the Walther WA2000 in the Splinter Cell games or the HK USP in virtually any other game.
     
  13. bratch

    bratch Member

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    I agree with Justin.
    I think video games are alot bigger area than movies. Alot have a pre-mission selection where you can pick what you want to carry and others tell you which weapon you have in use somewhere on the screen. Seeing the name HK in print on the screen would have more of an impact than seeing a HK in someone's hand.
     
  14. Gillster

    Gillster Member

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    I had the same thought after seeing SWAT and the Kimbers they used. I know LA SWAT is really issued Kimbers but reality doesn't always matter to Hollywierd. I know quite a few none shooting people noticed and expressed interest about Quigly's Sharps when that film came out. It was almost a commercial for that rifle.
     
  15. TheOtherOne

    TheOtherOne Member

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    I doubt it because movie makers don't care about branding much at all when it comes to guns. They just want what looks good on film.

    They don't ever worry about the brand of gun being used when someone in the movie murders an innocent person but they worry big time when it comes to other real products being shown in a negative light. I was just watching the making of Dawn of the Dead and they were talking about how they wanted to use real stores in the mall but their lawyers wouldn't let them because they were worried about getting sued if a Zombie got splattered next to a company logo.
     
  16. RRTX

    RRTX Member

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    I know LAPD SWAT uses Kimbers, but I'm almost certain they were using Springfields in the movie. I remember seeing the SA emblem clearly at least a few times.
     
  17. Jubei

    Jubei Member

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    I doubt that the gun manufacturers are working directly with the movie makers, more likely they are working with the armorers that supply Hollywood. They do have a lot ot gain, look at how Beretta sales jumped after Die Hard and Lethal Weapon, or Desert Eagles after The Matrix.

    Jubei
     
  18. Zach S

    Zach S Member

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    I never noticed a SA emblem. I'll have to keep an eye out next time I see it.

    Samuel L. Jackson did have a Kimber at one point though, someone at Kimber posted a pic of him on set with one at 1911forum.com. I'll see if I can dig it up.

    [edit] Adding pic.

    [​IMG]
     
  19. Hkmp5sd

    Hkmp5sd Member

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    I bet Die Hard 2 sold a bunch of those porcelain Glock 7s.
     
  20. Henry Bowman

    Henry Bowman Senior Member

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    It wasn't until I saw Predator that I even knew how much I needed a GE Minigun. :D
     
  21. CAS700850

    CAS700850 Member

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    I would imagine that the truth lies somewhere in the middle. After all, look how Dirty harry made Smith Model 29 sales shoot through the roof. I know John Milius is a gun knowledgable director, so his choice was not likely made on appearance alone. However, when you see (from ths ads at least) Demi Moore packing a pair of Desert eagles in the Charlie's Angels flick, you know appearance plays a big role.

    I think the bigger question is whether any of us have made a gun purchase based upon a film? I will admit that after seeing "48 Hours", I fell in love with the Smith Model 19 with the 2.5 inch barrel. Loved the appearance when Eddie Murphy was carrying it, and eventually got one.

    As for realism, I think there is somethig to say for Hollywood keeping close to reality, at least among the better/more expensive films. This explains the Kahr appearing in the "Shaft" film, and the proper Sigs in "In the Line of Fire". But, it's a lot more common (and even more fun) to see the mistakes and bad choices, so we can pick on them. Arnold carrying a Beretta 92 in an ankle rig in Kindergarten Cop? Please!
     
  22. MikeJ

    MikeJ Member

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    I definitely believe that having a particular brand and model of gun helps sales. For the newbie to guns, seeing the same gun used over and over creates the impression that it must be good or the current "hot" product. There are many gun buyers that don't visit forums such as this and buy based on whatever seems to be the latest rage. I've seen them many times in the gun shops and have overheard their statements that support this. It wasn't that many years ago when Berettas were seen repeatedly in a variety of very popular movies. I am of the opinion that the exposure Beretta received contributed to their popularity. For the person that isn't currently into guns but later decides to buy one for whatever reason I would imagine that many of these individuals go looking and asking about the gun they saw in such and such a movie e.i. "what was that gun Mel Gibson used in Lethal Weapon, it looked really cool."
     
  23. Robert J McElwain

    Robert J McElwain Member

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    Suppose "Dirty Harry" had said "This is a Sturm, Ruger Super Redhawk, in .44 Magnum, the most powerful handgun.........? Who would have been selling out their inventory?

    Bob
     
  24. dleong

    dleong Member

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    The animé Gunsmith Cats was virtually a three-episode, 90-minute infomercial for the CZ 75.

    (And it worked too--I am currently on my seventh CZ pistol.)

    DL
     
  25. Red Tornado

    Red Tornado Member

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    Well, after seeing Enemy at the Gates, it was absolutely essential that I have a Mosin Nagent 91/30. Other than that, I don't think I've had any movie influenced firearm purchases. Those blasted Russians, look how many Mosins they've sold with that placement! :p
     
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