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Get Home - NOT Get Out

Discussion in 'Strategies, Tactics and Training' started by Onward Allusion, Jun 23, 2013.

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  1. Onward Allusion

    Onward Allusion Member

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    I work almost 30 miles from my home and the area where I work can be best described as industrial and lower income. I'm not going to bring up any current events but I will say that there is a much stronger likelihood of civil unrest in the coming weeks. Those of us who have lived through the Rodney King Riot days in larger cities know what I am referring to. Those of you who are old enough to remember 1968 definitely know what I'm talking about.

    The following question is probably not applicable to anyone living in a small town of 3,000 or not having to go through a 1st or 2nd tier metro area to get home.

    SO.... - What are you doing or going to be doing differently, if anything, to ensure that you and your family actually make it home unscathed and not become a victim during these tense times. If you aren't planning on doing anything different, how do you ensure that you make it home everyday from work if you have to go through bad areas?
     
  2. Averageman

    Averageman Member

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    I have worked in the LA area. When I did there were some interesting times as I traveled all over from Reseda to Watts and worked briefly in Compton.
    I would reccomend a packed BOB, that fits your specific urban area needs, some time to sit down and plot out several different ways home in case of an "event" and if possible some training before you wait much longer.
    Take some time and get the facts straight about what your most likely event will be and build a plan from there.
    For instance;
    If your looking at a riot, you may well see what is the most likely trouble area it will begin in. Obviously you know the bad areas build your route around them. Most likely the traffic will be stalled in those areas but you might still have free access to a on ramp that will lead you 180 degrees away from whats happeneing.
    You can alway carpool and increase your numbers and strength in numbers and that works. A small 3 person group is a lot harder to pull from a car than a Single person and your ability to scan for trouble is greatly increased. A strong group with a plan is much better than one guy with no plan and some panic. Just make sure you have an preapproved plan you mutually agree on and stick with it.
    You can also predict these events and ask your employer if they have a plan for what will happen in case of civil unrest. Unless you have a family at home it may be better to hunker down at work and wait for a optimum time to leave for home.
    You control your route, you control the time that you depart, and you control your numbers if you can carpool; use that to your best advantage.
     
  3. Kayaker 1960

    Kayaker 1960 Member

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    Get home

    I'm a sales rep so I drive a lot. Mondays I work in San Francisco in a similar type area that you work. I have customers in Oakland, Richmond and Stockton. All of these can be problem areas. Except for Mondays I set my own schedule so I will avoid problem areas if trouble is looming.
    I keep a "Get home bag" in my car. It's a small back pack with a days worth of food, a liter if water, a full change of clothes, space blanket, flashlight, compass, fire starting supplies, 20 rounds of ammo to back up the 2 magazines that I have for my M&P40c.

    My biggest worry is getting home from San Francisco. I live 34 miles away and would have to cross the bay.
    In the event of an earthquake and the bridges are closed, I figure that I can find almost any type of boat and I'd be fine, if it doesn't have a motor then I'd just have to watch the tide. I could actually ride an incoming tide to within 6 miles of home.
    If it's civil unrest, then I think my best chance is just to join the hordes of other folks on the freeway and make my way across the Bay Bridge. If traffic is completely stopped then it's still safer than trying to get through the hoods. If I have to leave my car on the road and walk home, still better to be on the freeway with people like myself who have homes, families and work for a living.
    My neighborhood is pretty safe, middle class working folks. My wife works only 5 miles away and she'd be fine, even if she had to walk, which is unlikely.
    Averageman, good idea about car-pooling. There are several of us that live in the East Bay that could all go home together, it would be a mixed race car-pool so that could be an advantage as well.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2013
  4. stumpers

    stumpers Member

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    So, you're saying civil unrest just like LA and Chicago/NY are coming again? Why?

    I'm pretty up to speed on current events, and upcoming chaos is not on my radar.
     
  5. Piratesailor

    Piratesailor Member

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    We live in the burbs of a major city. We rarely need to head downtown or major population areas but regardless, we carry three day packs in our cars. That also includes our edc and extra ammo.

    The three day packs also serve well in case of a hurricane evacuation.
     
  6. 9mmepiphany

    9mmepiphany Moderator Staff Member

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    I remember 1968 (high school) and I was on an emergency response team of the Rodney King riots (as well as prepping for the Y2k festivities)

    The most important thing to have is a plan and to have your whole family aware of what they should do in case of various eventualities...everyone should know where to go and you should have a backup site. Realize that:

    1. Getting home by the fastest route isn't always the best idea. Going the long way is often safer and quicker. In San Francisco, you don't need to cross the Bay to get to the other side...you can go around.
    2. Leaving immediately isn't always the best idea. If you let congestion develop and become apparent, you'll be able to plan a route around it. Be ready to camp out where you are to let the panic pass
    3. While food and extra clothing is nice, water is essential (it is also the heaviest). You won't get very far, if walking, once you become dehydrated. You don't need enough extra ammo to fight a pitched battle, just enough to ward off attackers
     
  7. Trunk Monkey

    Trunk Monkey Member

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    I'm sorry, are you saying you'd steal someone's boat?
     
  8. jimmyraythomason

    jimmyraythomason Member

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  9. thefish

    thefish Member

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    To your get home bag, 3 day pack, bug out bag, whatever you calm it, I would add $300-400 in $20's. In a time of crisis, cash will get you further than an extra 20 rounds. You might need food, gas, water, shelter, a bribe, transportation, 20 things you can't even think of now.

    I keep a $50 in my mountain biking shorts. Always. Because you never know when you might need it. Its gone through the washer probably 100 times.
     
  10. Averageman

    Averageman Member

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    Originally Posted by Kayacker1960
    I figure that I can find almost any type of boat and I'd be fine, if it doesn't have a motor then I'd just have to watch the tide. I could actually ride an incoming tide to within 6 miles of home.

    I'm sorry, are you saying you'd steal someone's boat?

    With a name like Kayacker, perhaps he could bring a Kayak?
     
  11. MedWheeler

    MedWheeler Member

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    I live in Florida, and was enrolled in a predominately-black middle school in Riviera Beach in 1979 when the Liberty City riots broke out. It was bad, but my mother kept me and my brother out of school despite the administration's threats of absences being considered "unexcused" (there were no repercussions I can recall.)

    Where I live now does indeed have its share of, uh, "cultural diversity", but there is no actual bad neighborhood in my city of 140,000 residents. What "ghetto" element is sprinkled throughout the city enough to keep crime concerns up, but so spread out that the likelihood of organization to riot is extremely low.

    That being said, I'd get home, if not already, and batten down as indicated. I live in an area considered residential (single-family homes, with no downtown anywhere in the area.)
     
  12. Ben86

    Ben86 Member

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    I live 23 miles from work. Most of the driving is down a rural highway so traffic accidents are my main concern. I have a dozen different routes i can use if things go south on my favorite one. I think having many different routes and keeping a close ear out for the current urban events is very important. I also drive armed and watchful for a tail.

    That being said trying to drive through a riot is suicide. It's better to hole up somewhere safe until it dies down.
     
  13. The M

    The M Member

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    I drive 30 miles to work in Sanford Florida so it's definitely been on my mind. My biggest asset, besides the obvious lead projectiles, is knowledge of lots of ways out of the area, then back roads home. I also carry water, especially this time of year. I can't carry much else on my motorcycle which is my primary vehicle.
     
  14. Ed Ames

    Ed Ames Member

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    As someone who was in LA in '92, I for some reason don't think this has the same potential.I could detail my reasons but they don't really matter here.

    As someone who has had daily commutes ranging up to 95 miles (each way), and who has lived through natural disasters and riots, I am always ready hole up wherever I am and let situations, whether natural or man made, blow over. Sleep at work, get a motel room, whatever. I think the urge to get home can draw people into facing risks they don't need to face. There are exceptions of course - hurricanes, massive air/atomic wars, probably a few others - but usually buildings are safer than cars, which are safer than walking.
     
  15. ACP

    ACP Member

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    "I will say that there is a much stronger likelihood of civil unrest in the coming weeks."

    Then you had better bring your evidence to the proper authorities and let them head off a multi-billion dollar catastrophe.

    Right??

    That's how you get home safely, and on time.
     
  16. Kayaker 1960

    Kayaker 1960 Member

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    "I'm sorry, are you saying you'd steal someone's boat?"

    Borrow, rent Steal is a strong word. If I were to borrow a boat during a catastrophe, I would do my best to return it. Getting home to my family is my primary objective.
     
  17. Sheepdog1968

    Sheepdog1968 Member

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    My situation is similar to this. Luckily where we live would be unlucky to riot. Wife and I have talked about a variety of situations and what would force her to leave and where her top three or so locations are in case we can't communicated. In the 1989 earthquake in San Francisco it could literally take over an hour between picking up the phone and being able to make a call. Sometimes you just couldn't call. Our plans center around what if we can't talk. If its bad out I'd likely hunker down with friends in decent neighborhoods near work. My wife and I know that she may be on her own with our kids. She can fend for herself if need be. It was all part of the conversation when we made the decision to get nicer more affordable housing further,from work. Basically one of us is always working from home, mostly her. That way there is never and issue with us being separated from the kids.
     
  18. Onward Allusion

    Onward Allusion Member

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    Why the snark? This was a serious question. Sure, some of it might have to do with current events, but I drive what I consider a good distance and work is in a crappy part of town. If you don't have the possibility of civil unrest in your area, God Bless. I sure do have that real concern every day and it doesn't even have to do with current events.

    Let me tell you something, I have a Get Home Bag in my car. Any person who routinely 20 or more miles to/from work should have something in their car and not just for vehicle breakdowns. One thing that I did learn from this thread thus far is that CASH in $20's need to be kept on-hand in the GHB. Probably a couple/few hundred. Cash talks....

    The other thing suggested was to keep with the freeways rather than the streets and neighborhoods. Someone also mentioned water... It should be water in CANS and not plastic bottles. The heat in a car during the summer months will cause some of the chemicals to leach from the plastic into the water.
     
  19. gamestalker

    gamestalker member

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    I have had to commute on a regular basis between Yuma and Tucson for a period of over 4 yrs. and at least once per month for medical treatments. Let me clarify that this stretch of I-8 has signs posted warning travelers of the serious threat concerning carjackings and kidnappings due to the drug cartels operating in this 250 mile corridor. Unfortunately my commutes have often restricted me to either traveling unaccompanied, or on rare occasion my adult Son and his two toddler children would unavoidably have to travel with me depending on my current health status. We traveled well armed and with large quantities of ammunition, self defense shotguns 18 1/2" barrels and extended magazines, and with multiple handguns, AL's with plenty of ready to go 20 round mags, two well equipped AR's also with plenty of high cap mags.. They have boldly engaged in gun battles with anyone, including BP and DPS officers.
    My regular manner of of travel would be to maintain good distance between other traffic, but in this respect that stretch of interstate usually has extremely light traffic, sometimes you wouldn't see a car for 10 - 20 miles. And cell phones often don't get service for mush of the trip, so you feel very vulnerable.
    On one particular trip my Son, his two daughters and I encountered several cars traveling together as it appeared, and were occupied x3 to x4. As it turned out they made an obvious attempt to box us in going through a stretch that is without cell service. They had managed to get us slowed down while boxed in to about 45 mpr, but with some creative driving we managed to break out and had to hit speeds in excess of 120 mph until we acquired cell service, at which point they also knew that they had exceed the take down zone of no cell service area, and they quickly dispersed in multiple directions while DPS and BP tried to find them, unsuccessfully.

    My advice travel with plenty of defense options and don't ever, ever allow yourself to be boxed in and stopped. And in such circumstances as with drug cartel operating areas, don't pull over for LE until you have verified by cell phone that they are who they appear to be. On the particular stretch I'm referring to, the cartels are using vehicles that impersonate LE, and LE has advised that travelers use the verification by cell phone process before stopping for this very reason.

    Make sure you have plenty of fuel and other needs to reduce the need to stop your car. Watch your mirrors for suspicious activities, don't slow down where cars are pulled off to avoid being ambushed, and if necessary if you do feel you are being stalked and things get really hinky, black out if it is possible and reasonably safe, this makes it that much more difficult for them to know your precise location and speed at night time.

    As for traveling through California and other states that limit our ability to take such precautions as carrying weapons of self defense, I don't know what to say, except use good judgement, stay alert, and try to travel when it is less likely to be singled out and engaged. A busy hi way can be a deterrent sometimes, not always, but it would probably be better than late nights or early morning hours in most cases. And try to verify that an LE lighting you up is actually LE and not someone impersonating such.

    GS
     
  20. X-Rap

    X-Rap Member

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    We have a Senator claiming there might be trouble if the house doesn't vote his way on upcoming legislation.
    An ethnic leader is making claims of trouble if a jury doesn't see things his way.
    New revelations come daily about how our own gov spies on us causing increased tension and distrust.
    Yea things could flare up at anytime, I couldn't say two weeks or two years but being prepared is well worth the effort.
    I don't know how fast or how much of those water bottle chemicals degrade but sitting in a hot warehouse or riding in the back of a semi trailer gives them a pretty good start, I've heard about this but knowing that the bottle has seen a lot before I as the end user get it doesn't cause me great concern especially in an emergency.
     
  21. Lost Sheep

    Lost Sheep Member

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    The question posed by the OP is valid whether or not a catastrophe is imminent. Tornadoes in Oklahoma and the ever-possible earthquake from California to Alaska make such precautions wise, anywhere, as no region is safe from some kind of trouble. And ever-present unknown factors might generate localized pockets of danger of any size, anywhere, anytime.

    I speculate (NOTE: I speculate!) the OP might be thinking of the trial in Florida that starts Monday June 24.

    But that is BESIDE THE POINT.

    Are you ever-ready for an unexpected and difficult to predict emergency? What preparations do you suggest that we might have forgotten and what preparations have you forgotten that we might share with you?

    If anyone actually knows of a threat, it should be reported to proper authorities. As far as my speculation of the specific threat the OP has in mind, I am sure the government is aware.

    Lost Sheep
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2013
  22. coloradokevin

    coloradokevin Member

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    While I don't personally believe a catastrophe is imminent, I'd provide the following advice:

    1) Have some supplies with you in your vehicle. This isn't just the "how many guns and how much ammo can I carry" issue, as much as it is an issue of overall supplies: some food, some emergency vehicle equipment, a gun/ammo, some clothing, some water, a flashlight, a handheld radio, etc.

    2) Know of a variety of routes that you can use to get home. I can think of probably 10 totally independent routes I could use to get to my home from my work, should the need ever arise to avoid a primary route.

    My situation is probably different than most since I work in LE. In other words, if the "big one" hits while I'm at work, the odds are strong that I'll be staying at work for quite a while longer. Nevertheless, my home is well stocked, and my family is well-prepared. We aren't "preppers" in the popular context, but we're well prepared to take care of ourselves, should the need arise. A lot of that preparation actually comes from the fact that we're wilderness adventurers (camping equipment and "prepping" equipment can be one in the same).

    If I was trying to get home from work during a time of civil unrest I'd generally be in a more prepared situation than most: body armor, pistol, rifle, extra ammo, gas mask, ballistic helmet, police radio, etc. Plus, most of the non-work related preparations in my vehicle are more intended for the (far more likely) event that I might get stranded with a busted vehicle while recreating in the mountains. As such, I have food for a week plus a camp stove, tools, sleeping bag, sleeping pad, clothing, 7 gallons of water, flashlights, candle lantern, etc. I spend a LOT of time deep in the mountains, and it isn't hard to fit a Rubbermaid box full of supplies into the back of my pickup truck.
     
  23. MtnCreek

    MtnCreek Member

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    Be prepared to violate some traffic laws if it means staying out of a crowd or heavy congestion.
     
  24. Double Naught Spy

    Double Naught Spy Sus Venator

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    Why?? What has changed?

    I work from home. So staying home it is.
     
  25. Ed Ames

    Ed Ames Member

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    They think that if Zimmerman (the guy in Florida, not the public key encryption guy) is convicted there will be a WASP uprising.
     
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