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How much crimp? Lee FCD guidance sought.

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Lee Roder, Aug 19, 2009.

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  1. Gato Montés

    Gato Montés Member

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    Thanks for the input. The one on the left is CBC (Magtech) brass, center is Remington and right is Winchester. CBC tends to be the longest brass and Winchester is the shortest, so I have to find a medium between the two (or just suck it up and buy a trimmer).
     
  2. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    A Modified Roll Crimp on a 100 Gr XTP in .32 Mag.

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  3. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    Very Light Taper Crimp on .38 S&W

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    Berrys 148 Gr HBWC & X-Treme 158 Gr SWC - 1.035 & 1.075 O.A.L.
     

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  4. StandingTall

    StandingTall Member

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    Walkalong, your bullet photos are works of art!
     
  5. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    Thanks, but the pros here take better pics. I just take a whole bunch and delete most of them to get a couple that are satisfactory. :)
     
  6. Fishslayer

    Fishslayer Member

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    I agree. That .32 Magnum is definitely a work of art.

    The pros throw out a lot of pics, too.;)

    Thanks for taking the time to post them. I've learned a lot. A picture truly is worth a thousand words.:)
     
  7. sixgunner455

    sixgunner455 Member

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    This is absolutely true. I've watched that process more times than I can count. It's why digital photography is such a blessing to amateurs - puts us on the same footing (nearly) as the pros, because most of us could never afford the film expense a pro write off as the price of getting that perfect shot.

    This is a great thread. I just read the whole thing again, including the new posts from the last six months, which is about how long it's been since I read it last. It's brilliant to be able to actually see and compare to what I'm doing with my loads, too.

    And I'm going to forward the link to a couple of people who are just starting out, so they can get better visuals of what things are supposed to look like.

    I have a question about the .243. I just started loading for it, and I am wondering if I should crimp, or just rely on neck tension. Any thoughts?
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2011
  8. bags533

    bags533 Member

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    Great thread!

    I just loaded my first rounds last night. 30 rounds of .357 with, what looks like I've seen here, a heavy roll crimp.
     
  9. CavScoutSniper

    CavScoutSniper Member

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    How Much crimp?

    The crimp on example "C" looks just about perfect. I use a LEE Factory Crimp Die. Just follow the instructions that come with the die and then feel your way along until you get the desired crimp. It wont take you long until you are crimping by feel and getting it just right.
     
  10. CavScoutSniper

    CavScoutSniper Member

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    The LEE FCD is the way to go.
     
  11. CavScoutSniper

    CavScoutSniper Member

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    It is a good method to start with. You can also start by getting some 55gr or 62 gr .223 bullets with cannelures and set the depth until you are just slightly deeper on the cannelure than dead center then crimp 'em right there. It's very important to get a good crimp on any semi auto like the AR to prevent bullet "set back" in the magazine due to recoil. Set back can drive the bullets in the magazine deep enough into the case to cause pressure spikes in subsequent shots, not good!
     
  12. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    For auto calibers with just a hair of a taper crimp you can seat and crimp in the same step with no problems. The bullet moves so little and the "crimp" is so light it is not a problem. Crimping separately does nothing to increase function or accuracy. It doesn't matter if it is plated, lead, or jacketed. Deburring and chamfering the brass lightly is always a good idea, but I never do it for 9MM, .40, or .45.

    Some will say other wise, but that is my take on it.


    A medium to heavy taper crimp on plated bullets in revolver calibers needs to be crimped in a separate step since there would be too much bullet movement during the crimping while seating/crimping in a single step.


    For jacketed bullets with a well made deep cannelure, or a lead bullet with a proper crimp groove, there is no need to roll crimp in a second step.

    I trim all my revolver brass, as this makes a big difference in the consistency of the crimp. If you do not want to trim revolver brass, I would not recommend seating and crimping in the same step.

    I crimp in a second step on most pistol loads, and one or two rifle loads.


    Seated and crimped in one step with a Hornady seater.

    [​IMG]
     
  13. JohnM

    JohnM Member

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    I bought one of those when I ordered a carbide 3 die set to start loading .30 Carbine.
    Tried it on quite a few rounds, but it just seems to work the mouth of the case too much for my liking.

    The taper crimp shoulder in the regular seating die seems to give a much smoother crimp to the case.

    I also batch load on a single stage and seat bullets, then reset the die and apply the taper crimp.
     
  14. P-32

    P-32 Member

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    .

    This is open for debate. I’ve never found the need for using a FCD for any of my pistol or revolver ammo. The crimps supplied by the seating die has done the job well, rolled or taper. Seperate operations.

    If the FCD works for you don't assume it will be good for every one else.

    The only rifle ammo I crimp is 30-30 with the roll crimp working just fine. 223, 308 and '06 is not crimped using SMK's.
     
  15. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    Medium Roll Crimp on a .45 Colt 265 Gr SWC-HP (Cast by one of our own) Redding Profile Crimp Die

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  16. Lt.Dan

    Lt.Dan Member

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    If I'm having issues with my .45 pushing the bullets in the case when feeding does that mean there is too light of a crimp?
     
  17. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    Assuming .45 ACP, you do not have enough neck tension. Either the sizer is too big, or the expander is too big, or a little of both. Remington brand .45 ACP brass is the thinnest there is. Some sizers will not size it enough to give adequate neck tension. I have three .45 ACP sizers. One is too tight with thick brass, one won't work with thin Remington brass, and one is just about perfect.
     
  18. blarby

    blarby Member

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    Any chance of getting a few pics of your .30-30 crimp using a lee FCD ?
     
  19. OldCavSoldier

    OldCavSoldier Member

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    Definitely agree!
     
  20. OldCavSoldier

    OldCavSoldier Member

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    Yup! That's what I'm thinkin'
     
  21. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    Lack of neck tension. No amount of proper crimp on .45 ACP can fix poor neck tension. )
     
  22. v8stang289

    v8stang289 Member

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    Where does the lack of neck tension come from? Over belling the case to accept the bullet? or not having the seating die set up right? Or something else?
     
  23. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    The sizer is too big, or the expander is too big, or some of both. Try sizing some cases and loading them without using the expander. If you have enough neck tension then, the expander is too big. If you don't, the sizer is too big.
     
  24. Cearbhall

    Cearbhall Member

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    Bump. Too good of post to get lost.
     
  25. chhodge69

    chhodge69 Member

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    another bump to keep it alive.

    Any chance this thread can become a sticky?
     
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