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Mora

Discussion in 'Non-Firearm Weapons' started by AStone, Dec 31, 2012.

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  1. Coyote3855

    Coyote3855 Member

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    So what do you use to sharpen your wife's teeth?
     
  2. BullRunBear

    BullRunBear Member

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    Elkins45 wrote:
    "Before I married all my knives were razor sharp because I would sharpen them while watching TV in the evenings. It was very relaxing.

    Now my wife says the sound makes her teeth hurt, so I have to sharpen them in the basement."

    I'm lucky. My wife likes the sound of knife sharpening and encourages me to do so. She's also the reason I have a S&W Model 29, a custom flintlock, and several other guns in the safe. I married a gem. :D

    Jeff
     
  3. MikeJackmin

    MikeJackmin Member

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    I sharpen my scandis with 800 grit emery paper, placed atop a magazine (the reading kind) on the kitchen table. Makes for a lightly convex edge that works great, and is no fuss at all to maintain.
     
  4. AStone

    AStone Member

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    Float glass: "... a sheet of glass made by floating molten glass on a bed of molten metal, typically tin, although lead and various low melting point alloys were used in the past. This method gives the sheet uniform thickness and very flat surfaces."

    Hence I thought the name was really "flat glass". :D

    See, the engineer who invented this new flat glass made a typo in the report, so ever since, they called it "float glass", when in reality ... oh, never mind. Yeah, I get it.
    _____

    Great sharpening suggestions here. Good to have options. Thanks.
     
  5. Mr. Tettnanger

    Mr. Tettnanger Member

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    Nematocyst,

    Please keep me posted on your opinions of the Spyderco Bushcraft. I am just trying to find one for a decent price before I pull the trigger again.

    A Mora is great, but a Real Bushcraft knife is a big step up. I am not a snob, but there really is a difference. To some it may not be worth it, to others it is money well spent!
     
  6. AStone

    AStone Member

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    Will do, Tett.

    I'm brand new to not only the world according to Mora, but the world according to bushcraft knives in general. But from what I've experienced with my Mora - now two; second companion in green arrived today for more formal occasions than orange allows :rolleyes: - I think I'm going to really like the Spydie.

    Add my ongoing lessons about knife craft with luminaries like Mors Kochanski (in his Bushcraft and videos) - and I'll have a degree in bushcraft in mere decades. :D)
     
  7. dayhiker

    dayhiker Member

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    LOL......I have been doing this "Bushcraft stuff" looonnnnng before it was called Bushcraft.

    And I am still learning new tricks. :D
     
  8. AStone

    AStone Member

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    Smiles. I've been backpacking/mountaineering for 4 decades, so I've got lots of those kinds of skills. But moving from higher tech equipment (mountaineering tents and white gas stoves) to a lower tech approach (lean tos and efficient fires or portable twig stoves, and lots of carving stuff) is a newer endeavor. It's an exciting new lifetime of learning that I get to do built on the base of knowing how to deal with a nasty monsoon or winter storm in the southern Rockies at 11,800' ... or at least knowledge of what one needs in terms of shelter and fire to be able to survive there, even if one's tent rips up in a storm.
     
  9. dayhiker

    dayhiker Member

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    Almost 4 decades of being a woods bum for me. Always been a low tech guy, and this "bushcraft" stuff has been around since before Otzi the Iceman.

    Yet ,somehow, someone always can show you yet another way to do something that is so simple, It makes you slap your forehead and think "Why didn't I think of that" :D I love it.:)
     
  10. AStone

    AStone Member

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    ^ Yup. :D ;)
     
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