moving a Safe alone?

Discussion in 'Shooting Gear and Storage' started by Mark_Mark, May 7, 2021.

  1. Viking357

    Viking357 Member

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    I moved my safe, a Winchester 26 gun safe by myself. It weighs about 375 pounds. I rented a 4 wheel cart and I used a couple of 4x4 posts, used them like a teeter-totter rocked it up and down and lifted it up. It can be done. Im about 5'4 and 165 pounds. Just be safe, pun intended and you can do it. :)
     
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  2. Dibbs

    Dibbs Member

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    I can and have called professional movers. Find movers who work with safes, they have special dollies and lifts, and they also protect your steps and door thresholds. The damage you save the house, alone, makes paying a couple pros to do it worthwhile.
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2021
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  3. Mark_Mark

    Mark_Mark Member

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    your not kidding!
     
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  4. CapnMac

    CapnMac Member

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    Given current lumber prices, you may have to hunt down galvanized studs for the surround in the garage.
    You need channel for the top & bottom "plates." You'll need a mice big box of 5/16" self-frill self-tapping screws (known as "points" in the trade).

    Upside to metal is that you can cut them to fit with tin snips. No having to take a measurement, get off the stepstool, go to the saw, and chopsaw the one stud at a time. Instead, you take the measurement, then put the tape on the stud, then tin snip it to correct length. Then, spin on a couple of points while you are right there (leave the foot loose). Move 16" further down (or 19.2" the black diamond distance on the tape) and repeat.

    Invest in some mineral wool insulation and you get a two-hour wall assembly for your safe surround.

    I have this habit for such builds to lay in a hank of 12/2 romex at 12" up, then some 12/3 up around 72" off the floor, and just leave the ends looped in the existing walls. Just never know what sort of new power or lights that might want installing 20 or 25 years down the line, and having the material in place can help.

    That's my 2¢, spend it as you will.
     
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  5. Mark_Mark

    Mark_Mark Member

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    Sounds Complicated. I’m going the Home Style (Ghetto) route with left over lumber and stuff I picked up off the curb. I’m really good with drywall and mudding and tile. I’ll make it look good and on a budget
     
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  6. Riomouse911

    Riomouse911 Member

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    My safe was moved and installed by pros, it wasn’t worth the hassle or back strain to save $250 bucks.

    They used a tilting dolly to move it from their truck into my garage. The final moving was done using about six pieces of 1/2” gas line pipe cut into 2’ lengths. They used the old Roman way of moving stuff, roll onto the pipes and bring the rear one forward as you move it. The safe rolled right across the remaining length of floor, swiveled around and popped into place under an overhanging shelf :thumbup:.

    Stay safe.
     
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  7. GE-Mini-Gun

    GE-Mini-Gun Member

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    I’ve moved mine (#1200) a couple times with the help of two other guys…no stairs and only a 6” threshold to get into the house. A dozen or so 2” schedule 80 PVC pipes about 30” long and a 42” pry bar, if you’re going across carpet I’d get larger diameter pipe…keeps the carpet from “waving”. Hamburger and beer after…everybody happy(ish).
     
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  8. Slamfire

    Slamfire Member

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    No, and hell no. I remember reading about the number of people crushed by vending machines tipping over and killing them, and while the number is small, the rate is about four times higher than being eaten by a shark. This is from 1998


    WARNING: DON'T JIGGLE THAT VENDING MACHINE


    https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-xpm-1998-09-13-9809130280-story.html

    Dear Laura: That news story is sure to save lives. I had no idea a soft-drink machine could be a killer. The statistics are staggering. Thank you for sending it on. Here's a shortened version of the story:


    A man whose son was crushed to death by a soda vending machine has filed a $500,000 wrongful-death lawsuit against the soda company and the companies that manufactured and serviced the vending machine.


    The 27-year-old man apparently rocked the machine, which fell, pinning him against a wall and crushing his chest. The father decided to sue after learning his son's death was not an isolated incident. "The penalty for jiggling a machine to get a quarter out or a free Coke shouldn't be death," said the man's lawyer.


    The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission found that between 1978 and 1995, at least 37 deaths and 113 injuries resulted from falling vending machines, which can weigh 1,000 pounds.


    A 10-year-old boy in Arizona was killed when a soda vending machine fell over after he and another boy jostled it. A college senior in Kansas died of internal injuries after a soda machine fell on him in a college dining room. A Michigan high school student died when a machine fell on him in a city recreation center.


    Three years ago, seven manufacturers of soda machines mounted an industry-wide warning-label campaign to alert customers to the dangers. One label states, "Warning! Never rock or tilt. Machine can fall over and cause serious injury or death." Usually, a bank of machines is bolted together, making them virtually immovable. Stand-alone machines may be bolted to a wall, but owners aren't required to do so.


    According to the attorney, almost everyone who uses vending machines knows the annoyance of dropping coins in the slot and not getting the goods, which results in people kicking or jostling the machines. "Even though it's not their intent that people should be jiggling the machines, manufacturers and distributors should know that in the real world, that's happening," he said.


    And now, dear readers, this is Ann talking. There should be a law requiring all vending machines to be bolted to the wall. Meanwhile, a copy of this column posted next to the vending machines in your building could save a life. I recommend it.

    You plan to wobble a safe into place, there are risks. If you plan to do it by yourself, there are more risks. The big risk is if you lose control. If you tip a 700 lb safe over, are you strong enough to prevent it from crushing you?

    As I recall, when office safes were brought into buildings, the movers had a special safe dolly, it was at least a four wheel affair. And there were usually three guys, and these guys rolled the thing on hard floors and up elevators.

    Depending on how far you are going to move the thing, get friends to help, get the proper moving equipment. Don't end up smashed flat under a safe.
     
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  9. WestKentucky

    WestKentucky Member

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    I did a couple months at a furniture store doing deliveries a while back. We used an appliance dollie for anything up to about 700 pounds. 2 people is pretty well a necessity though as you need a spotter. Those safes are wide and long so it’s hard to see the far end when you have it up on its balance point but it moves easy and you can quickly wreck a wall (or a fridge like we did once). With no steps along the way it should be a fairly simple move.

    Also a possibility depending upon clearance underneath, a pallet jack could be just the ticket if it will fit. That’s how I moved my personal safe at the previous house. I’m likely moving again in the near future to a place a bit bigger so kids have more room, and next time I will use a furniture dollie.
     
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  10. Elkins45

    Elkins45 Member

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    I moved my 1050# safe across my garage on a layer of steel BBs and just left them in places as spacers for airflow when I bolted it down.
     
  11. Mark_Mark

    Mark_Mark Member

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    great Idea!
     
  12. Elkins45

    Elkins45 Member

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    I should add that if you go this route you really need to practice walking by shuffling your feet. You absolutely do NOT want to try to walk on a layer of BBs. My wife and I used brooms to gently reposition the layer of BBs as I pushed it toward the wall. It’s amazing how easy it was to roll something so heavy...but it’s not so easy to stop so don’t be giving it a giant shove it there’s someone between it and the wall.
     
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  13. Rembrandt

    Rembrandt Member

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    [​IMG]

    DeMille used old women to grease the skids....of course it might be a bit messy on your floor.;)
     
  14. Mark_Mark

    Mark_Mark Member

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    what size BB’s did you use?
     
  15. Mark_Mark

    Mark_Mark Member

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    Everyone knows the Ancient Aliens move the Pyramid Block!
     
  16. Elkins45

    Elkins45 Member

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    Just the regular .177 Daisy BBs. I bought the big carton at Walmart, however many that holds.
     
  17. Mark_Mark

    Mark_Mark Member

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    really!!! that’s interesting
     
  18. GBExpat

    GBExpat Member

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    First thing that I thought of after reading the @SUBJ was the 2021 Darwin Awards ... anyone else? Show of hands ... :)
     
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  19. 12Bravo20

    12Bravo20 Member

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    I have successfully moved safes by myself from my garage into the breezeway with only a 2 inch step up by using a good 1500 pound rated motorcycle/ATV floor lift.

    This is the one I used from Harbor Freight. Though my biggest safe is only 1,000 pounds. As long as you balance the load and strap it down good it works well.

    https://www.harborfreight.com/1500-lb-steel-atvmotorcycle-lift-60536.html
     
  20. redfin00

    redfin00 Member

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    Bought mine,back of truck,have a tractor with forks,have a friend just in case,depends how far to move,may need pallet jack,I use pipe to roll it on?
     
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  21. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator Staff Member

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    My nephews and I used 1" nylon bars for my 1200 pound safe years back, but same theory. Since the safe in question here has outside hinges, he can take the door off to help get the weight down. We did that as well. My son and I moved his the other day, took the door off and used a hand truck. Maybe 400 pounds.
     
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  22. George P

    George P member

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    Absolutely! If you can take the door off, you just removed 1/3 of the weight
     
  23. vintovka

    vintovka Member

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    Two guys with dollies and a flat bed did mine. Done doing it myself. One slip and I would be "done"
     
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  24. Elkins45

    Elkins45 Member

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    But then you have to get it back on, and that’s more difficult than you might imagine.
     
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  25. vintovka

    vintovka Member

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    True, many have washers or bearings that must placed properly and all aligned precisely and simultaneously while lifting the heavy door into position, Even 4 hands may not be enough unless skilled. After 70 plus years you "gots to know your limitations" and how long it takes (or costs) to heal.
     
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