Night vision for coyote hunting.

Balrog

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I have developed a coyote problem on my land and need to get rid of them. I am considering getting a night vision or thermal scope, but don't know much about them. I would use it on a 223 bolt gun or possibly an AR. I live in a climate that is hot and humid most of the year, and often foggy at night and in the early morning.

I would anticipate all shots would be at 150 yards or less, probably more like 50 to 100. I would do most of my hunting in woods, and around the edges of open fields. I would like something fairly compact. I would rather not break the bank. I do not really care about some of the features that some scopes have, such as bluetooth to phone, video recording, etc. I just want a scope that can let me see in the dark so I can kill the coyotes.

Will I be better served with an IR nightvision scope or thermal? What are some good choices to consider?
 
Digital IR like ATN X-Sight or Sightmark Wrairh is going to be the cheapest. But scanning with these is problematic due to lag and focusing quirk. They are only as good as the Illuminator you use with them and in my opinion are best used to focus on an area or target. Scanning with a thermal like the ATN Thor is better, but after doing some thermal hog hunting in TX, I think the ideal route is to use a thermal binocular or monocular to scan and locate targets, then use the thermal or digital rifle scope to shoot.
 
Bait and call and use a high powered WML will be your cheapest method.
A thermal on a semi auto with a can on it will be your most effective.
I do recommend staying away from cheap IR.
 
To give you some reference, the ads you see on TV and youtube are seldom representative of the real world quality. Here's an example of what a cheap digital looks like. This is the ATN X-Sight at 100yds and a 10 inch target. No where near as clear as the ads they play, but good enough for what I do with it.

 
Chickens will bring out every predator you have around. If you don’t have them at your problem area get them (caged) and trap at the location. If the goal is to rid the area of predators.

If you want to buy stuff to shoot warm blooded animals at night with, I’d try thermal first. That way you won’t wish you’d tried it sooner, than later.
 
I wish I could, all my daytime attempts to hunt coyotes have failed but all electronic night sighting systems are illegal for night hunting in TN.
 
I wish I could, all my daytime attempts to hunt coyotes have failed but all electronic night sighting systems are illegal for night hunting in TN.
Are you using a electronic call?
 
Are you using a electronic call?
Yes, I have tried both electronic and mouth calls, and even bringing my brother who is much better at mouth calls than I am. No dice. I have three picture sequences on game cameras with as many as five coyotes in them. I hear them almost every time I spend a night at the hunting property but they are super wary to humans.
 
We live in east TN and there are coyotes around our hobby horse farm. The horses seem to keep them at bay as the coyotes do not encroach on our property. We hear them barking all around our property but they do not seem to bother the horses.

Of course, if you do not have horses, all bets are off. My daughter has a horse farm over in NC and has chickens. She has some problems with predators but it is mostly smaller predators than coyotes.
 
I wish I could, all my daytime attempts to hunt coyotes have failed but all electronic night sighting systems are illegal for night hunting in TN.

They are pretty sharp most of the time. They get stupid Around chickens though.

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Then you just need something to detect motion, I built mine with OR motion sensors that power up some old radios and a digital voice recorder. When something is prowling around outside, I get a call.

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I have also found it’s a lot easier to get the drop on them from above vs a ground floor door. So I just go upstairs and open the back door. Yeah, the chicken coop was put there on purpose.

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I have developed a coyote problem on my land and need to get rid of them. I am considering getting a night vision or thermal scope, but don't know much about them.

You have NV, Digital NV (called "cheap" NV above) and thermal. First of all, never buy anything ATN. That is my opinion. I know the prices are great by they have a very sorted history in terms of QC and CS. Don't fall for how they have changed in recent years. People have been saying that for at least the last decade and people are still complaining.

Regular NV, no reason to mess with anything under Gen III as digital NV is about as good as Gen 2 traditional NV, but without the worries of frying the sensor with daylight use. Gen 2 and digital will require an IR illumination. Gen III can cost you as much or more than many thermals.

A variety of companies make digital NV such as Sightmark, Arken, Rix, oneleaf, Armasight, Pulsar, etc. Most of these are well under $1K with an IR illuminator that will get you out to 200 yards, give or take, given the physical and environmental conditions. Some will definitely get you further, but most folks are shooting further. If you are, you will likely want to invest another $200-400 on a more high powered illuminator such as a Coyote Cannon. Using an IR illuminator is best in open field situations because of photonic barriers (reflected light from objects in foreground with blind the viewer to objects in the background). This goes for any NV where you are using an illuminator or have lights (barn lights?) in your shooting environment between you and the target.

Night vision can see through glass. Thermal cannot. You don't want to drive with thermal.

If you tell me more about your shooting environment, caliber, budget, other concerns, I can make some digital NV or thermal suggestions. If you want traditional NV, there are others with more info than me.
 
I was in the same position, for the exact same purpose, this summer and went with a thermal clip on. The only disadvantage is forward weight.

You maintain your optics zero, you can use it hand held as a spotter, which is VERY handy.

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Holding a camera steady is a bit challenging, but this should suffice.

Short Video
 
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I have a Wicked Light that works out to 250yds on clear nights. Think it was in the $150 price range. Adjustable base is a must. I move it between scoped guns.
 

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I have this one right now, it works well out to about 150yds or so. Same company as the Coyote Canyon, which is the next step up from this one.
 
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