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Plated .224 Bullets

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Kp321, Sep 29, 2012.

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  1. Kp321

    Kp321 Member

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    Has anyone used Frontier plated .224 55 gr bullets? The price is very attractive but I am wondering how they work in quick twist AR barrels. I can live with less than stellar accuracy if they stay together to the target.
    I have used their pistol bullets and am pleased with them.
     
  2. NeuseRvrRat

    NeuseRvrRat Member

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    are they cheaper than pulled bullets?
     
  3. SSN Vet

    SSN Vet Member

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    I loaded the 150 gr Berry's FN for my .30-30, and at normal velocities they were all over the place, indicating (I think) that they were spinning apart.

    When down loaded, I had to raise my rear sight quite a bit to get them on paper...

    I gave up and have loaded Jacketed bullets for the rifle ever since
     
  4. KansasSasquatch

    KansasSasquatch Member

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    Plated rifle bullets generally need to stay below 2000fps or so. At that velocity the charge you'll be using isn't likely to cycle an AR action. I think the plated .224 bullets are generally meant to be used in bolt guns. Something like .311 plated bullets can normally be used in an SKS since those rounds typically don't get over 2200-2300fps anyways and a lighter load will most likely still cycle the action.
     
  5. longdayjake

    longdayjake Member

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    There are several plated rifle bullets that are rated for high velocities.

    Federal Fusions
    Speer Gold Dots
    Speer Deep Curl

    It isn't so much the fact that they are plated that determines whether they are good for rifle velocities, but how thickly they are plated that makes a difference. Without knowing how thick the frontier bullets are, I can't say one way or the other. But my guess is that they are not plated very thick and may or may not work. I will look into it.
     
  6. KansasSasquatch

    KansasSasquatch Member

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    I believe those are all examples of fluxed core bullets. There's a bit of a difference. And I'd have to check prices but just guessing I would say those three are going to cost a good bit more than normal plated bullets.
     
  7. buck460XVR

    buck460XVR Member

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    I don't know about the Fusions, but the Gold Dots and Deep Curls I use are more expensive than most quality jacketed bullets. I use them because they are accurate and effective, but they are not range bullets nor are they cheap.
     
  8. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    They are all plated.

    Fluxed core is a term used to indicate a bonded core conventional jacketed bullet.

    rc
     
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