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Prediction - Please read new reloaders

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by kestak, Apr 15, 2009.

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  1. kestak

    kestak Member

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    Greetings,

    Did you also notice how many new reloaders are posting questions on THR or firingline?

    Did you also notice how many new reloaders are suggesting SCARY stuff?

    Did you also notice how many new reloaders are making sloppy mistakes?

    Did you notice how many new reloaders reload without a reloading handbook?

    Two years ago, I was not reloading. It took me weeks before I was able to reload my first round. I asked litterally more than a hundred questions and I read 4 books.

    Just in the last 3 weeks, I mentioned 3 times and sent 5 PMs to those new reloaders guys mentionning their practice is dangerous and they SHOULD read the instructions BEFORE reloading their first cartridge.

    They are not even scared that they are handling explosives and they create a small explosion in their hand...

    There is one who answered to me saying he does not need to read anything or to have a log book because he just have to check on Internet. Doh!

    I see we have here many new reloaders who asked questions. For those who are lurkers and do not ask, please ask and please be careful.

    - NO QUESTION IS STUPID (Even if I feel stupid often asking my questions)
    - Buy reloading books, read the instructions before doing something. In doubt, ask. You can ask here, call the manufacturer or go to your gun club and ask to the old timers.
    - Check and double check. Be concentrated whith your reloading and avoid distractions.
    - Slow is good, haste is potential disaster.
    - Discipline is the key.
    - Cleanliness and order also is the key. Your reloading bench must be clean and ordered.
    - A log is important. I log everything and I can't count how many times I went back and look in my log.

    I predict a bunch of guns will blow up sooner than later...

    I just hope this message will save some trouble to some people.

    Thank you
     
  2. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    Good post!

    And yes, I noticed! :banghead:

    rc
     
  3. R.W.Dale

    R.W.Dale Member

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    I noticed too.

    Couple a blind panic with a tightness in the supply side of the component market and the result are the dozens of weekly "can I use LR magnum primers in 45acp" threads.

    My prediction


    Some folks will put their eyes out, the govt will feel compelled to enact tighter regulation "for the public safety" and the rest of us will suffer because of it
     
  4. kelbro

    kelbro Member

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    And they may be at the range, sitting on the bench next to you...
     
  5. edelbrock

    edelbrock Member

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    I am new on the forums and am relatively new compared to some of the reloaders on this forum. I have noticed a lot of the scary things that people have posted and have tried to give my warning as well. If I know the answer to the question I will give my input, otherwise I will let someone more knowledgeable answer the question.
    Reloading is a dangerous hobby. One should never think they know it all and can give up on learning. For as long as I reload I think that reloading will be a learning activity.
    New reloaders should never turn down free advice as it is offered on these forums. If you will not accept good advice and practice good safety, then you should not load. Go buy factory ammunition and save your eyesight, being maimed, or maybe even your life.
    Remember: Safety First!
     
  6. kestak

    kestak Member

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    Greetings,

    They are sitting beside us. 4 weeks ago, a guy blew up his Taurus 1911 model. When we asked questions, he said we was loading .5 grains higher than the maximum because he wanted +P rounds... :banghead:

    BUT THE WORSE!!! He said it was ok what he was doing and the issue was the gun is too weak. :fire:

    Thank you
     
  7. ReloaderFred

    ReloaderFred Member

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    Those of us referred to as "old timers" all learned to reload before there was an internet, and in some cases, before there was a computer, period. We learned by reading actual books. You know, those things printed on real paper, and written by people who had lots of experience and had ballistics labs to back up their experiences. Believe it or not, they still do print books, and the authors are bold enough to use their real names and in most cases even put their pictures in the introductions of those real books.

    To rely solely on the internet, where anyone can claim any kind of experience, is at the very least foolhardy, and at the most, outright dangerous. I've seen many postings by people who made it obvious that they didn't have a clue about what they were presenting as fact, yet they posted it as if it were gospel.

    My advice to anyone contemplating starting to reload is to turn the computer off and get some of the well known reloading manuals and spend some quiet time reading the front portions of the manuals. That's the part where they explain all the terms and components, and go into great detail on how to actually put those components together safely. You will have to turn the pages by yourself, though. Books don't come with a mouse..

    Then, after having read at least a couple of real manuals, if they need clarification on something, then turn the computer back on and ask the question, but have a little knowledge derived from the manuals before they ask the question so they can sift through the "pelosi" (that's the new term for BS, by the way) and be able to tell fact from fiction.

    Just because it's on your computer screen, posted by someone using an alias, doesn't make it fact, or safe. That goes for my own postings as well, which I'm very careful about, since I very strongly believe in helping people not make mistakes. But double check all information presented by anonymous posters, period. It always amazes me when someone posts load data, and the post is full of typographical errors and misspelled words, but people take the data as being safe. It may well be, but for heaven's sake, check with known references before using that data.

    This doesn't apply to all posts, by any means. My intention is to get people to check the known and tested data before relying on the internet as their sole means of information.

    Boy, I feel much better now........

    Hope this helps.

    Fred
     
  8. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    No, it's not, if you do it right. It is probably one of the safest in fact!

    I could name dozens & dozens of hobbies that are more dangerous then reloading.

    Even fueling your lawn mower & mowing the yard are much more dangerous then reloading!

    Storing the lawn mower gas & BBQ propane tank in the garage is far more dangerous then a basement full of powder & primers.

    rc
     
  9. edelbrock

    edelbrock Member

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    I meant that it can be a dangerous hobby if you do not follow safety precautions and try to step outside the bounds of accepted reloading practices that have been developed over many years. There are a lot of steps that are clearly laid out in reloading manuals that must be followed.
     
  10. jfh

    jfh Member

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    Like the others, I've noticed the influx of new reloaders who are clueless.

    Some of us, I suspect, are really scratching their "older" heads, wondering how some of these newbies made it this far in the world--i.e., have not learned basic principles for learning "physical" skills.

    Others here--ReloaderFred--have called out some of the tips one can use to develop (reloading) skills and knowledge--and a lot, I think, has to do with people who have not learned to analyze/build/make stuff. Of any sort.

    Hands-on work is less and less needed in our typical society--and we have become more dependent on others for expertise.

    Jim H.
     
  11. bushmasterar15

    bushmasterar15 Member

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    I'm also new to reloading but will read the reloading manuals before I atempt to start. Also will be asking questions.
     
  12. lukepriebe

    lukepriebe Member

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    I plan to start reloading in the near future and I will take all precautions available. My brother blew up a 30-06 when he was 18 because he decided to try something new.
     
  13. RoostRider

    RoostRider Member

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    Nope- I don't get my reload information from the internet.... sorry, but even the experienced reloader could make a typo that would get me killed, not to mention the blowhards and fools that seem to proliferate on the net. I actually have load manuals *sigh*.

    I wouldn't trust a net forum to give me advice about a personal relationship, so why would I trust it for advice on explosives/propellants/ballistics that might cost me a few fingers, an eye, or my life?

    See above about blowhards and fools.... :)

    Fred seems to have covered the bases pretty well. Without the manuals to verify, "advice" on relaoding given on the net is dangerous.

    PS- you might consider the same logic for other, "less dangerous" advice you might seek from the net.... just saying
     
  14. Hesenwine

    Hesenwine Member

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    Reloading is a dangerous hobby.

    I'd put sky diving ahead of reloading on the "dangerous" list. :D
     
  15. glockman19

    glockman19 Member

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    Good post. Thanks.

    I too am new to reloading. I have all the equipment, two reloading manuals and plan on taking a course at the reloading store at my local range before actually beginning.

    I recieved a strange PM from a poster with no history that thought I was "a well informed source" for reloading. I told him exactly what you suggest. Read at leas two books the ABC's of reloading and Modern Reloading By Richard Lee. I also suggested he read the loads that came with his lee dies and to double check it with the loads recommended by the powder he is using in addition to finding a mentor who can walk you through the process on your own equipment. I bought a lot of my sturr from a friensd father, former reserve sheriff who will spend a day with me reloading my first rounds.

    IMHO, reloading is serious business and should not be taken lightly.
     
  16. doorman

    doorman Member

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    With the possibility of chamber and barrel shrapnel moving in all directions.

    I have been reloading for about a year and "I am not an engineer but I play one when I reload".

    I have read several manuals as per recommendation along with a single stage press to gain a complete understanding of all steps and processes. The people that worry me have zero loading experience and go out an purchase something on the order of a 550B to start punching out as many rounds as quickly as possible.

    RU
     
  17. Funderb

    Funderb Member

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    Can I put 12.7 gr of blue dot in my .45acp reloads? (this is a joke :))

    Har. Har.

    I imagine the trend may follow your idea, but may not be as catastrophic as you seem to think. If they are asking these questions, such as the above, they will get gnarly mean responses, and then be less inclined to be stupid.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2009
  18. Landric

    Landric Member

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    One will also notice that most of these new handloaders think that they absoultely need a progressive press with all the bells and whistles in order to make handloading possible.

    Of course, some of the old hands (by no means most, and I see little of it on THR) don't help any by posting responses to the "What kind of press" posts with the single sentence "Buy a Dillon".

    I won't argue that the Dillon presses are not nice (they are), but IMO any progressive, especially a 650 or 1050, is the last thing a new handloader needs. One can go an entire handloading career without a progressive and be just fine, but they are not for the newbies, especially those without the first clue about the process.
     
  19. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    Well, be patient my friends. They are our future, as well as our present source of frustration.

    Lots of good folks here trying to guide them in the right direction and answer some of their questions, all while trying to get them to buy a reloading manual or two. Cudo's to them.

    Mentor comes to mind. :)
     
  20. kestak

    kestak Member

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    Greetings,

    Funderb, you should edit your post and remove the "load" data. It is not safe...:what:

    One of those dumb head that do not read well could try it. :banghead:


    And end up in :fire: with :evil:



    Walkalong: It is why I wrote that "rant". To save the few who want to be saved.


    Thank you
     
  21. Walkalong

    Walkalong Moderator

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    I understand the motive, and it is well intended and admirable. :)
     
  22. USSR

    USSR Member

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    Ahh, but Fred, that's so LOW tech.:( But very good advise.

    Don
     
  23. jmorris

    jmorris Member

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    I too agree with the op’s feeling. I have responded to, in my belief, far too many “how to reload steel/aluminum cases” as well as others that I feel are just as negligent as posting loads beyond published data.

    I think you discredit the source when you allow such threads to continue.
     
  24. rcmodel

    rcmodel Member in memoriam

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    Well, every time we tell some new guy not to bother trying to reload steel, aluminum, or Berdan:

    Six more guys post that they do it before breakfast every day.
    And have for the last 17 years without a single problem, to speak of!!

    rc
     
  25. kestak

    kestak Member

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    Greetings,

    Maybe this is "quite" subjective, but when a poster answers me and he has 1000 posts and more, I tend to give him more credits than a poster with 10 posts.

    Also, when 3-4 posters qith 1000s of posts and when I see their other posts, and they make sense and they are of quality (proper English, proper syntax, proper paragraphs and puntuation) and I can verify or they give the source of their information, I give more credits to those answers.


    Thank you
    I am not born English speaking, so my English is no perfect, but I think it is logical and proper. :)
     
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