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PSA- Please please if you want to appear knowledgeable ...

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by R.W.Dale, Jan 7, 2013.

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  1. BHP FAN

    BHP FAN Member

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    Sorry danez71, I was trying NOT to be derogatory...I was actually thinking something much worse, and was merely looking for a polite way to put it.;)
     
  2. browningguy

    browningguy Member

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    I think all you folks need to quit worrying about terminology, it's doing exactly zero. People are going to use slang in all walks of life.
     
  3. BHP FAN

    BHP FAN Member

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    you're welcome to do so.
     
  4. buck460XVR

    buck460XVR Member

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    Some things this thread and others like it have taught me.


    A.) Folks who claim that they don't care what other folks do are the ones that tend to get the most upset when those other folks don't agree with them.

    B.) Just cause folks are anal about something, shouldn't mean they have to be a rectal orifice to others that aren't.

    C.) Same folks that pound their chest and claim that using correct terminology puts them above those that don't....still lower themselves to arguing on the internet(can't get any more stupid than that).

    D.) Still the same ol' coupla of folks that feel the need to call folks names and belittle others when discussion doesn't get the results they want.

    E.) Folks that insist others always use the correct terminology, pride themselves on calling lead projectiles "Boolits".

    Last time I checked, one did not need to be a English major to be a active, contributing member on an internet gun forum. I thought the common bond here is firearms, not proper grammar and that the intended usage was to exchange knowledge and opinions about firarms in a polite and friendly way. Anybody that has been on a gun forum for more than a month knows darn well what someone means when they say "clip" "casing" or "9mil". Still nary a thread containing those words can go more than 3 posts without a self-imposed grammar Nazi jumpin' in tryin' to impress. Can I see a raise of hands to see who all here is impressed? I'm thinkin' outta the 13,500 active members here, I might see three hands.......:rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2013
  5. FIVETWOSEVEN

    FIVETWOSEVEN Member

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    They were using that word correctly. The rifle you posted is the first Assault rifle.
     
  6. BLB68

    BLB68 Member

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  7. splattergun

    splattergun Member

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    seems likely, as the stripper clip feeds the magazine. Wouldn't make sense to feed the clip with a clip or feed a magazine with a magazine.

    Sorry, my high school German class was too long ago to attempt the translation.
     
  8. BHP FAN

    BHP FAN Member

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    Well. So far I've been called anal, a butt, and a Nazi. I think I've been pretty polite. I'm going to take The High Road.
     
  9. danez71

    danez71 Member

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    Dont get too torqued up..... there just a bunch of no nothings ;)


    Seriously though... and speaking of torque.... 99% of people will say that a motor has xxx ft-lbs of torque. Its lb-ft.

    Ive come to realize that I cant expect perfection from others when I'm not perfect myself.
     
  10. 2ifbyC

    2ifbyC Member

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    The Urban Dictionary defines Stripper Clip as a fastener for holding your bills when paying for lap dances.

    Sorry, I just hit a ditch in THR. But there is a fine line between reason and insanity.:eek:
     
  11. BHP FAN

    BHP FAN Member

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    well, it would have gotten boring if I'd just kept referencing the gentleman's post on number nine.
     
  12. 1911 guy

    1911 guy Member

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    And nobody has yet mentioned the fact that 9 millimeters do not equal .009"?
    And even if we were going strickly metric, 9 millimeters would be expressed as 9.0 mm. .009 would be nine tenths of one millimeter.

    Carry on with your normal thread.
     
  13. R.W.Dale

    R.W.Dale Member

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    Um that's kinda the point in this thread.

    9mils is .009"

    9 millimeter is .355"



    posted via that mobile app with the sig lines everyone complains about
     
  14. 1911 guy

    1911 guy Member

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    No, nine mils are not .009 or .009". Mils are not millimeters, they are a unit we use to measure the chordal length of an arc, shorthand for milradian. Think "mil-dot" scopes.

    .009" is nine thousandths of an inch. .009 millimeter is nine thousandths of one millimeter.

    I guess what I'm getting at is "mils" is NOT thousandths of an inch. Calling it such in my line of work either gets you laughed at for being an idiot or taken off the job and sent to push a broom so you don't cause any more confusion. I'm a machinist and we deal with prints both in standard and metric. When you mean thousandths of an inch, say so. When you mean millimeters, say so. "Thou", short for "thousandth" is in no way interchangeable with "mil", even when used as shorthand for "millimeter".
     
  15. R.W.Dale

    R.W.Dale Member

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    Like it or not mil or mils (plural) is a recognized unit of measure for length.

    You typically see it used in industrial applications as a way to express paint or film thickness, for example OUR PRINTS will not call for a min paint thickness of .006" it will say plain as day 6mils

    http://www.google.com/url?q=http://...a=X&ei=3ojuUPnnMaf42QXpyYH4Aw&ved=0CDcQygQwAQ

    [​IMG]




    posted via that mobile app with the sig lines everyone complains about
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2013
  16. JohnBT

    JohnBT Member

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    "shorthand for milradian"

    Shouldn't that be milliradian?

    "The milliradian was first invented in the mid nineteenth Century by Charles-Marc Dapples (1837-1920), an engineer and professor at the University of Lausanne."
     
  17. holdencm9

    holdencm9 Member

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    Whoa now, as an engineer I have never made the distinction. I usually write it as lb-ft but don't think it is wrong the other way. Since it is technically lb*ft or ft*lbs, it is just always written with a dot instead of hyphen but must be typed as lb-ft or ft-lbs. It really doesn't matter which comes first, it is multiplied. I.e. torque being equivalent to a moment, or a lever (length) times force (lbs). But I guess even then you could get confused by pound force or pound mass (although I only ever work on earth so it is assumed that it is pounds force.

    Back to OP, different words can have same meaning, same words (or abbreviations) can have different meanings. Even units as described above. mil can mean a lot of different things to different people in different industries. I think the worst sin of all is ignoring units of measure entirely! "Let me bust out my nine and bust a cap" comes to mind.

    And wait, how has this thread remained open so long. :confused:
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2013
  18. JohnBT

    JohnBT Member

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    It keeps us from arguing politics?
     
  19. BHP FAN

    BHP FAN Member

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    ''It keeps us from arguing politics?''

    exactly. I've actually had a lot of fun with this one. The folks that are wrong had some pretty good arguments.;)
     
  20. danez71

    danez71 Member

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    From Wiki....

    A pound-foot (lb·ft or lbf·ft) is a unit of torque (a vector). One pound-foot is the torque created by one pound force acting at a perpendicular distance of one foot from a pivot point.

    One pound-foot is exactly 1.3558179483314004 newton meters.[note 1]

    The foot-pound force (symbol: ft·lbf or ft·lbf), or simply foot-pound (symbol: ft·lb) is a unit of work or energy in the Engineering and Gravitational Systems in United States customary and imperial units of measure. It is the energy transferred on applying a force of one pound-force (lbf) through a displacement of one foot. The corresponding SI unit is the joule.


    The name "pound-foot", intended to minimize confusion with the foot-pound as a unit of work, was apparently first proposed by British physicist Arthur Mason Worthington.[1] However, foot-pound (ft·lb or ft·lbf) is also sometimes used interchangeably with "pound-foot" to express torque.[2]


    The foot-pound is often used to specify the muzzle energy of a bullet in small arms ballistics, particularly in the United States.

    "Foot-pound" is sometimes also used as a unit of torque (see Pound-foot (torque)). In the United States this unit is often used to specify, for example, the tightness of a bolt or the output of an engine.



    Although they are dimensionally equivalent, energy (a scalar), and torque (a vector) are distinct physical quantities. Both energy and torque can be expressed as a product of a force vector with a displacement vector (hence pounds and feet); energy is the scalar product of the two, and torque is the vector product
     
  21. holdencm9

    holdencm9 Member

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    :scrutiny: I hear ya, but TWO TIMES in the wiki you linked they specifically say that ft-lbs and lb-ft are interchangeable.

    In my particular discipline it is indistinguishable, no one will worry that I am talking about the energy of a bullet when I calculate the moment capacity of a beam. I won't lose any sleep over it :cool:

    Again, with calcs as with words, context is key, and knowing audience. But it is always fun to pick nits. :D
     
  22. trayzor

    trayzor Member

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    Originally posted by buck460xvr
    Amen, that's why I rarely post.
     
  23. ljnowell

    ljnowell Member

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    I will file this one under "who cares." Thats right next to clip/mag, thier/their, and your/you're. I guess I have too many real world concerns to give a poo about stuff like that. I guess you are lucky to have such time to devote to it.
     
  24. danez71

    danez71 Member

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    And that was the point of what I was saying.

    9mm..... 9mil.... Clip... mag...

    We all know what we all are talking about so it boils down to pick nitting.... I mean nit picking ;)
     
  25. BHP FAN

    BHP FAN Member

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    I love picnics!...wait, what?
     
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