Really new but confused

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Runningman22, Jan 11, 2021.

  1. Runningman22

    Runningman22 Member

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    I have bought nothing yet. I don’t know what to buy first I want to reload 9mm 223/556 30-30
    Will one press do it all?will all dies fit all machines?
     
  2. dredd

    dredd Member

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    Welcome.

    Yes to both. (In General)

    A Modern Single Stage Press and Modern Dies will all link up.
    I'm sure there is an exception someone can point out.
     
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  3. magyars4

    magyars4 Member

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    Straight walked cases can use carbide dies, so no need to lube the cases.
    Best way, IMHO is to start with 9.
     
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  4. hanno

    hanno Member

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  5. AJC1

    AJC1 Member

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    There are shortages of components and equipment right now. If you were to start look for primers first. 30-30 would be least in demand and the easiest to find stuff for, and represents the best long term value. Download manuals here and read the front matter before doing anything else...

    http://marvinstuart.com/firearm/Manuals/Reloading/Reloading%20Manuals
     
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  6. Obturation
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    Obturation Contributing Member

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    One press will do everything expect most won't be big enough for 50 bmg- no worries.

    Most dies are universal but if you find some that aren't many pressed have bushings / adapters to allow different dies to be used. Like lee breech lock system. No worries

    If I were you, I'd buy a single stage press that's available and some dies that are available. You'll be limited these days and will take some time to get everything together, when you find an available die set for one of your desired cartridges I recommend ordering bullets asap, they're running a couple months + behind so there will be a wait. Then start hunting for primers, buy any you can at a decent price , if they aren't what you need trade them for what you want. You'll need to look hard for powder too, watch the "where are components available" thread and get what you can. Powder and primers if bought online have hazmat shipping charges ($30+), don't just order a $20 can of powder and pay $30 to have it shipped- make your order worth placing - it's expensive but cheaper in the long run.

    Very first thing to buy is a reloading manual, I like Lyman but the others are good too.

    Powder & brass can be purchased directly from the manufacturer and is often in stock when everyone else is out. Can sometimes be backordered too and then you just have to wait instead of just being out of luck.

    If you live in a rural area you'll have an easier time finding components , if you live in the city or suburbs expect to do the majority of your buying online.
    If you want cast bullets , I like Missouri bullet co.
    If you need brass, check on starline site.
    If you know what powder you want, check on hodgdons site.

    Good luck, tough time to start. We're all hanging around blabbing about reloading over here and most don't mind helping.

    Welcome to the high road
     
  7. Runningman22

    Runningman22 Member

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    What is straight walked?
     
  8. Runningman22

    Runningman22 Member

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  9. Obturation
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    Obturation Contributing Member

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    Straight walled - a case with no shoulder. 223 is smaller at the bullet end- bottlenecked
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2021
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  10. Carl N. Brown

    Carl N. Brown Member

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    Straight walled ... Probably autocorrected to "walked".

    Cases are either straight walled (.38 Spl etc), tapered (9 mm Luger etc), or bottle necked (.30-30 etc).
     
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  11. AJC1

    AJC1 Member

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    I'll say it again because it's that important. Read at least one manuals frontmatter completely before buying anything. You can download the most current manual from western powders on their website. The lyman manuals have the best front matter in my mind. A book that is also very helpful is call metallic cartridge reloading.
    https://www.amazon.com/Metallic-Cartridge-Handloading-Pursuit-Perfect/dp/1571573712/ref=mp_s_a_1_3?dchild=1&keywords=metallic+cartridge+reloading&qid=1610413049&sprefix=metalic+cartridge+&sr=8-3
     
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  12. Erief0g
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    Erief0g Contributing Member

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    welcome aboard.

    There is no urgency in getting setup and started in todays market. As others have stated, and it can't be stressed enough, you will have to look awhile before your able to find what you are looking for.
    I would also concur that starting with 9mm may be a nice entry to reloading as straight wall cases leave out a few steps. Also not having to trim/debur/ chamfer bottleneck cartridges reduces some initial purchase items.

    Start a notebook. Whether it's on your PC or a regular notebook it's time to start. you will want it for once you get things going anyway as writing down your load data will become your own reloading library that you will reference for years to come. The intial entries today can simply be starting a list of items you will need. You can also start to narrow down the list from Press.. to single or progressive press... to a brand/color that you think fits your needs.
    add scale, micrometer, dies, powder types, primer type, bullet weight/style, amount of brass on hand/purchase some range brass perhaps from the reloading for sale section on the board, bullet puller, ammo storage boxes....
    determine the placement of your bench, construction (very sturdy), height of bench. storage area preferabbly climate controlled for your materials.

    Lots of things to start writing down which will lead to good practices when you start developing loads or writing notes about book loads you've duplicated and tested.

    You will write down 100 things and only need a handful to get started. take the time to figure out exactly what you need as it will be hard to get and no need wasting time looking for things you may not initially need.
     
  13. Reloadron
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    Reloadron Contributing Member

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    Reloading / Handloading like many other hobbies has a learning curve, not a very steep curve but none the less a learning curve. I suggest getting a few books like The ABCs of Reloading, books which focus more on learning to roll your own than just loading manuals which place more focus on loading data. You will obviously need hardware starting with a good enough press, all of the hardware will be outlined in books so it will always start with a good book and understanding what you are reading. When you read things you may not understand just come here and ask. You don't need a high end fancy press to get going, a simple single stage (step by step) press will do you just fine. The press will likely be your biggest outlay of money. Be it Lee, Hornady, RCBS or any of several others they will all get the job done. Also look for used tools from Estate Sales and other sources including this forums for sale sections. The same is true for dies. Eventually you will gather all the needed pieces and parts.

    On a shopping note you can consider any of the kits available. Buying a starter kit has both its good and bad sides. You get most (not all) of what you need but also get some stuff you likely will not need. The merit is you are not shopping through a dozen different sources and comparing prices. Ultimately you can decide which way works best for you because asking the forum you will get conflicting answers based on personal opinion of each of us. I bought my brother a RCBS Rockchucker Supreme kit several years ago for Christmas. My logic was simple, I wanted everything in one nice box and I was too lazy to order a dozen tools individually. This gave him a good start and made my shopping easy. :)

    Ron
     
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  14. Bush Pilot

    Bush Pilot Member

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    Consider this as a suggestion. If you belong to a range try to find an old timer that reloads. Odds are pretty good he'll invite you over and show you the ropes and let you do a hands on. I'll promise you'll learn more in a couple of hours than you will from manuals. Don't get me wrong, manuals are vitally important but nothing beats hands on.
     
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  15. Mark_Mark

    Mark_Mark Member

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    WELCOME to reloading... you will never look at Ammo the same again! most of my reloading buddies laugh at current ammo prices. we actually don’t ever talk about factory ammo
     
  16. Highland Lofts

    Highland Lofts Member

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    This is a bad time to get started in to reloading. For instance primers were $39.99 a thousand they are people that have them extra are getting top dollar for them. Saturday at the local gun show a guy wanted $225 for 1,000 large rifle primrrs.
    $125 for a $50 set of 9mm dies.
    I am on several gun forums and constantly check out the reloading for sale section for things I want to pick.up. I just connected on a set of 30/40 dies for only $15 and $8.30 shipping.
    I just bought a nice RCBS RockChucker press for $100 in great shape locally so no shipping.

    Once you decide what you want to do some of us can help you out.

    I have bought and still buy stuff from e bay.
    If I see something and it is bid up to high I wait for another item to get listed and see where it goes.

    Check out some youtube videos on the different aspects of reloading.
    Some of the posters are questionable.
    But most are reputable
    Don't hesitate to ask questions on heren you will get some good answers.
    Like every thing in life there is more then one way to skin a cat.
    Do yourself a favor and start out with a nice quality single stage press.
     
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  17. Hondo 60
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    Hondo 60 Member

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    Yes, one press can do it all.
    (not every press, but some will)

    And again almost all dies will fit almost all presses.

    BUT...
    Sounds like you first need a manual to tell you how, why & what parts.
    My favorite is Lyman's 50th edition.
    About 1/2 the book teaches a good bunch of what you need to know.
    The other half has data for each caliber, different powders, different bullets, etc.

    If I'm buying Hornady bullets, I want Hornady manual.
    If I'm buying no name bullets, that's where Lyman's or Lee's "Modern Reloading" come in.
    (just don't believe all the hyperbole in Lee's book
     
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  18. Highland Lofts

    Highland Lofts Member

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    Lee does really slap his own back over & over & over again through out the book.
    On several calibers the lee book has starting loads higher then the max load listed in the Hornady book.

    When buying used I like RCBS. They have GREAT LIFETIME WARRANTY.

    I have bought RCBS dies that needed stems or other parts and always got them shipped to me for free.
    When I buy new I buy RCBS because of thier outstanding customer service.
    I needed a couple of small things from Lee and got a run around so I have lityle Lee products.
     
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  19. Bfh_auto

    Bfh_auto Member

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    The Speer manual has a very good intro to reloading in it.
    Like others said. Don't jump in half cocked.
    Primers are scarce. If you can find some. Buy some and start to move on accumulating your other supplies.
    Lee makes inexpensive products that work well.
    You can use the same powder in 223 as 30-30.

    If you live near Tulsa OK. Dongs will sell you the same amount of primers as bullets.
     
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  20. Klaatu Barada Nikto
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    Klaatu Barada Nikto Contributing Member

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    Watch Craigslist for Estate Sales and generic reloading stuff.
    Right now everything is top dollar.
    Dillon doesn't mark up anything, they were already kind of steep but the "after sale" support is amazing.
    Be prepared to wait up to 5 weeks for your press to be delivered.
    If you are serious about 5.56 then you will need a de-swager to remove the military primer crimp.
    Personally I have found that a single stage to decap 5.56 is perfect for your "Case Prep" station.
    Also, IMO forget the media vibratory tumblers and go straight for the Frankford Arsenal wet rotary tumbler, it comes with 5 pounds of stainless pins.

    Good luck!
     
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  21. lordpaxman

    lordpaxman Member

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    Welcome to THR!
    There’s lots of great advice here. As you’re reading all the information keep in mind the volume of reloading you want to do. I got started with a single stage press and one rifle caliber. That definitely taught me the process and I still use that press today. Even with that low volume I felt I created better than factory ammunition. It did get me addicted though... be advised and good luck.
     
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  22. fotheringill

    fotheringill Member

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    Lyman's 50th manual, new or used. The 49th is also fine. Ignore the load data at the back part, but as above, read and UNDERSTAND the entire instructions part in the front part. You can also ignore the folksy stuff about Uncle Joe's great squirrel hunt in 1976. Go slow and if stumped on a step, ask here.

    I would purchase a kit with a single stage press. It is probable that after a year or so you will start replacing various items as it suits you, and not the old guy at the range who says "use this die or powder or whatever. You will be left with the press and little else other than invaluable knowledge gained. Right now, you will be reading and learning how to ride a tricycle, not going into a NASCAR race. Tailor your initial purchases for that tricycle. When you start getting into upgrades, i.e. electronic powder dispensers and scales, check the warranty BEFORE purchasing.

    Slow, steady, eyes open and ASK about what confuses you.

    Good luck and safety first.
     
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  23. NVcharlie

    NVcharlie Member

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    What part of the country are you in? Find someone who reloads and ask them to show you. Ive walked 3 people through the basics. Reading is important but doing is a faster way to learn.
     
  24. PWC

    PWC Member

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    Make sure your single stage press is an "O" type, not a "C" type whether it is green, orange or red. O is stronger than C and your grand kids will use it too.
     
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  25. Reloadron
    • Contributing Member

    Reloadron Contributing Member

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    That would be ideal to have a seasoned mentor teach you with hands on.

    Ron
     
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