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Recoil problem please help!

Discussion in 'General Gun Discussions' started by Tough Guns, Mar 2, 2011.

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  1. Tough Guns

    Tough Guns Member

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    Hi, i always kind of had a problem with recoil, scared to say im afraid to try anything i havent already tried. when i was 12 i didnt know how to shoot a rifle correct i was just put behind a marlin 35. Boom. the gun went off and got scope forhead. even since then i've just been sticking with a marlin 30-30, a 12 gauge, a flintlock, and a .22. BUT I WANT CHANGE! i want something different that doesnt kick much worst than a 12 gauge, a 30-30 and a flintlock. i was wondering how bad is a .223, .243, 7mm, and a 30-06? please let me know the difference in recoil between them. thanks.
     
  2. hoghunting

    hoghunting Member

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    Welcome to the forum.

    If the .30-30 recoil doesn't bother you, then you won't have any problems with the .223 or .243. Not sure which 7mm you're referring, but if it's the 7mm Remington mag, then its recoil will be more than the .30-06. But if you can handle the 12 ga, you will probably be fine with either cartridge.
     
  3. dawico

    dawico Member

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    Have you tried 3" 12 gauge shells? If you haven't, they are worse than anything you have listed there, and you can probably try them without buying a new gun.
     
  4. JEB

    JEB Member

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    if you can handle your 12ga with slugs, i would say you should be able to handle any commonly available cartridge in the U.S.

    i shoot a fair amount of slugs getting ready for deer season and i have not fired any centerfire rifle that kicks more than the 12ga slugs IMHO (this includes rounds such as 22-250, 30-30, 7.62x39, 7.62x54R, 30-06, and 7mm rem mag to name a few).
     
  5. Tough Guns

    Tough Guns Member

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  6. chris in va

    chris in va Member

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    223 out of an AR-15 is like a 22LR. Kicks less than my HiPoint carbine 9mm.
     
  7. twofifty

    twofifty Member

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    It is too bad that people, out of ignorance or out of a misplaced sense of humor, put 12 year olds behind too much gun. TG, I imagine that was your first time firing a gun...never even put behind a nice .22LR to learn the ropes or figure out what eye relief was best for you.

    I'm thinking that the Marlin 35 that scoped you did not have the scope mounted in the right place for you. Or the stock was too long for your body size, so you ended up 'crawling' up the stock (so to speak) in order to reach the trigger... putting your face way too close to the scope.

    My suggestion is that you get help from an experienced friend (or pay a gunsmith to work with you) and get all your scopes (even on your .22) mounted in the optimal place for your body type, your hold, and of course while maintaining adequate eye relief. When your cheek is touching the 'cheekweld spot' on the stock, make sure there is no image vignetting, i.e. that you have a full, clear and shadow-free view through the scope. Get your scopes mounted to suit, and you will be safe even behind the more powerful cartridges.

    Knowing you are safe behind a fitted scope will eventually do away with that bad memory, and the slight flinch that usually comes with such mishaps.
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2011
  8. Tough Guns

    Tough Guns Member

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    your exactly right everything you said. now im 18 years old. i am a pretty big guy, im 6'3 and pretty broad. i have a 30-30 with a tasco scope and under and over mounts. i think its a great idea to ask help from a gunsmith to work with me for a better setup. i want change and you probably cant blame me. i was looking at maybe a remmington 770. but i dont know what id get in it like maybe a 7mm, .243, .223, or .30-06. i hunt alot. i go for deer, and i want to start going for turkey, squrrel, and rabit. any suggestions?
     
  9. shiftyer1

    shiftyer1 Member

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    I recommend a .22 lr for squirrel and rabbits. To be honest, if your comfortable with a 12. ga especially with slugs, your gonna be fine. I have a history of dislocated shoulders and are pretty paranoid about recoil due to pain. Is your problem with the scopes?

    What do you use deer hunting?
     
  10. Tough Guns

    Tough Guns Member

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    i deer hunt with a marlin 30-30. but i was considering getting a .243. scopes arent as much a problem as the recoil. i like to compare it so i know what it would be like before i buy something i wont like. i flinch alot. i just dont know why. ive shot 20 times with my flintlock. and each time i flinched i think
     
  11. shiftyer1

    shiftyer1 Member

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    The flinch will go away the more you get comfortable with the gun. Although I don't understand why a 12 ga doesn't bother you. I thought maybe it was just a case of you fearing getting bopped in the noggin with the scope.
     
  12. twofifty

    twofifty Member

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    Others will chime in with suggestions...here are mine:

    A Ruger 10/22 for rabbits, squirrels - you should use your shotgun if the area you hunt has thick cover or if it is unsafe to use a rifle. Put a 2x scope on it, or iron sights.

    For turkey, something like a .17HMR with a 4x scope. Or a 'turkey choked' shotgun for tightly patterned head shots. The semi-auto shotguns are popular for turkey around here, even though we have open terrain.

    For deer, you could look for a nice used Savage lever chambered in 250 Savage, which is a classic retro piece from the 60s. There's lots of good bolt rifles out there, new and used.

    For example, I had a close look last week at the new-this-year Savage Axis package which includes a basic 3x9 Bushnell. Lots of value in that package, a good build that I figure would not disappoint a young hunter looking for change.

    You can get the Axis in stainless or blued bead-blasted. Has the excellent Savage action. Good detachable box mag. Good recoil pad. Metal trigger guard and sling studs. Standard trigger but with a very clean crisp release. Decent plastic stock. Bedded action iirc. The Axis is available in .223, .22-250, .243, .25-06, 270 Win, 7mm-08, .308, .30-06.

    If you are used to a .30-30 and a 12 gauge, you will find the 7-08, the 25-06, the 243 to be good deer rounds, with recoil that is well within your comfort zone.

    I'd be tempted by the .243 as it is an accurate flat shooter, has super mild recoil, is devastating on deer and fun on groundhogs/prairie dogs/coyotes, relatively cheap to reload so you can practice a lot with it.

    Have fun.
     
  13. twofifty

    twofifty Member

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    flinching

    Flinching is a common affliction even among experienced hunters who have never been scoped. You've been scoped, so no surprise that your mind is second guessing you as you release the trigger.

    I've been told by several hunters and target competitors that I respect that flinching can be cured -or at least put aside for awhile- by doing a lot of .22LR shooting. You get into a regular .22 training routine to learn position shooting (prone, sitting, post or tree supported, over a hunting pack, standing with and without sling). Look into Metallic Silhouette matches, they're fun and the competitors will be glad to coach you.

    After 5000 rounds of thoughtful organized .22LR practice, you will be a crackshot and that flinch will be gone. These skills and the new mindset will transfer immediately to a well fitted .243 Win.
     
  14. Cryogaijin

    Cryogaijin Member

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    My dad was an ass. He came from the school where you give a 7 year old a .22 and let him plink (Supervised, of course) then give the 7 year old a shotgun for the Lols.

    Needless to say I ended up with a flinch.

    The way I worked past my flinch was doing various forms of clay-shooting. Having so many things going on at once is an excellent way to keep from overthinking and flinching your shots.
     
  15. J-Bar

    J-Bar Member

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    Part of a flinch is noise. We are all programmed to react to loud noise. Double cover your ears by using both in-the-ear plugs and muffs, then do some benchrest work with a .22, focusing on getting small groups. You won't hear or feel a thing, and it will allow you to train yourself into developing a smooth trigger squeeze and motionless follow-through.

    Been there myself.
     
  16. 243winxb

    243winxb Member

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    Hand load your ammo. Hodgdon has Youth loads, Trail Boss powder. There are also cast bullet loads from Lyman using pistol powders. The 3 methods will reduce recoil and velocity. Some ammo manufactures even produce low recoil ammo. Check what availabe at Midwayusa.
     
  17. oneounceload

    oneounceload member

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    Most flinches are caused by an anticipation, typically recoil. Bad memories or too much over a long period of time induce them - ask an old trap shooter who has fired 100's of thousands of those 1-1/8 trap loads why he now uses a release trigger

    recoil is a thing to be avoided at all cost - it has nothing to do with being macho - it has everything to do with becoming debilitated when you're older
     
  18. jiminhobesound

    jiminhobesound Member

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    Consider how you grip a gun. I grew up with side by side shotguns, lever and bolt action rifles. I was taught to grip the forend of the guns and later developed my own method of pushing with the forend gun and to pull in the gun at the butt end of the gun. I believe this technique served me well in firing some pretty potent guns.
     
  19. Iggy

    Iggy Member

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    Pound for pound a Winchester 30-30 kicks about as bad as anything.

    If you can shoot a 12 gauge, you can handle most anything.

    Get your scopes properly located and go for it.

    I got a 30-30 when I was 12. Hardest kicking thing I ever shot. Traded it for a 300 H&H when I was 14. Had to kneel to be able to shoot it. First shot put me on my back..... With practice I got use to it and killed my first elk that fall.

    Now I ain't trying to impress you with a bunch of macho stuff here. I'm just sayin' if your gun's set up right and you do some shooting, you can overcome the flinch quite well.

    Good luck and good shootin'!!
     
  20. Tough Guns

    Tough Guns Member

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    Thanks!

    Thank you for all the replys! i am going to try some of them before i buy a gun. is there any recomended for me? i already have a 30-30. is 7mm and 30-06 overkill?
     
  21. twofifty

    twofifty Member

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    work up not down

    Given experiences similar to yours and the resultant flinching, I'd work my way up to the .30-06 or 7mmRemMag, not the other way around.

    You've got a 30 caliber (.308") already, your 30-30.
    If you really want a 7mm (.284"), get the 7mm-08.

    Take a good look at the .243's ballistics and talk to .243 deer hunters before you decide.
     
  22. Tough Guns

    Tough Guns Member

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    that sounds like a good idea. what do you shoot?
     
  23. toycruiser71

    toycruiser71 Member

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    Hi TG....one of the things that worked for me was a lot of dry fire practice. Get some snap caps or something that will protect the firing pin and practice....A LOT. Be safe, make dang certain you are safe, then check again to make dang certain you are safe. Focus out like you have white tail in your sights, breathe correctly, squeeze and make sure that barrel stays put when you hear that click.
    I have a .308, which is my second hardest hitter behind my 12 gauge, but seriously, even there, no comparison to the 12 gauge. I have never shot a 7mm mag, but I think I would like to try one. My other rifles really don't have much kick at all to them. .223, .22 and .357 mag lever gun. Good luck!
     
  24. JTHunter

    JTHunter Member

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    Tough Guns - what twofifty said about the .243 is correct.
    I've had a Remington BDL with a Simmons 3x9 scope for 20 years and do reload 4 different loads. Being in Illinois however, I can't use it on deer, but I do have the scope set for a 200 yd zero.
    Recoil is less than my 12 gauge even with my reloads which are near the maximum powder charge for those loads. Shooting off of sandbags and loading a single bullet each time, I was able to put a 7-shot string in an area smaller than the palm of my hand (~2.5 x 3 in.) at 200 yds.
    The 4 loads I reload are 60 & 75 gr. HP, 100 gr SPBT, (all Sierra bullets) and a 70 gr SPSX from Hornady. These loads all use Accurate's 2230 powder on a Lee Progressive reloader setup.
    These loads in this caliber will let you take everything from prairie dogs and groundhogs up to a good sized deer. You might, might even be able to use the 100 gr. (deer) load on feral hogs, if they aren't too big.
    Good luck!
     
  25. Tough Guns

    Tough Guns Member

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    My dad has a 30-06 which i fired a couple times but was scared to death "was only 12 or 13". I need to find a decent gun for the $300 range. i have 2 12 gauges but to be honest with you i cant remember them being a harsh kick. i have savage and a H&R. the h&r has a recoil, the savage doesnt. but they dont feel much different or any different. they are both pump action. is that why they dont have much kick?
     
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