Quantcast
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Reloading Bench Ideas

Discussion in 'Handloading and Reloading' started by Olympus, Dec 22, 2010.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Olympus

    Olympus Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2008
    Messages:
    3,564
    Does anyone have any ideas for a decent reloading bench? I've been looking through the photo thread and it looks like a lot of people use some kind of kit that has brackets and you just add the 2x4s and top. But I can't figure out who makes those. I've been to Lowe's and Home Depot website and can't seem to find any kind of kit for a workbench or anything.

    Anybody know what those kits are called/where they are sold? Or have any other ideas for a reloading bench. The wife says I can't do any kind of built-ins because I'm going to be using a spare bedroom. So I need something that will be free standing and that has a shelf or two for storage. Ideas?
     
  2. ranger335v

    ranger335v Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2006
    Messages:
    3,797
    Both Lowes and H'depot sell the galvanized brackets you ask about, don't have any idea if they are listed on the web sites tho. Using those brackets to make a work bench frame makes the project easy. Use 2x4 material and "dry wall" type bulk screws to hold the frame together. Add support underneath for a storage shelf. Use solid surface material for the top, inexpensive particle board or OSB works fine. Add additional 2x4 cross members under the top where you plan to mount tools like the press, powder measure stand, etc. Enclose the ends and back with the cheapest, thin paneling you can find and glue it on the legs; that will provide an incredible amount of bracing for a totally rigid bench.

    Make your bench height for standing work (about 40-42") and plan to use a thrift store "bar stool" for sitting work. The top should be as long as you have room for, mine is 8' and it's none too long. Make the top no wider than 24" (21" is good) wider benches only makes it difficult to reach items that get pushed back.

    Protect your top surface from spills. Three-four coats of marine grade polyurethane does a very good, durable sealing job and makes it easy to clean.
     
  3. Vette

    Vette Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2009
    Messages:
    41
    Location:
    CENTRAL KANSAS
    Lowes has a bench made by kobalt in ss or powder coated. Has a steel pegboard back with a bin across top that i keep powder in . Drawers under wood top. I have mounted 2 lee progressive presses and a lyman turret. Works for me.
     
  4. whipper

    whipper Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2006
    Messages:
    103
    Location:
    The Republic of California (Valinda)
  5. Olympus

    Olympus Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2008
    Messages:
    3,564
    Well I was looking for something sturdy, but as inexpensive as possible. That's why I was thinking about some kind of pre-fab kit or something.
     
  6. CoRoMo

    CoRoMo Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2007
    Messages:
    8,940
    Location:
    Californicated Colorado
    2x4 lumber, a sheet of plywood, and deck screws.
    Nothing will be cheaper. Nothing will be more sturdy.
     
  7. oneounceload

    oneounceload member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2008
    Messages:
    15,710
    Location:
    Hot and Humid FL
    A Gorilla Rack from Costco or Sam's works well when you add a double layer of plywood as the top - set the unit in half and side by side and you have an 8' long bench that is sturdy and is not permanently built it. I have done this in two homes - I get two shelves capable of holding literally a ton of lead on each unit - the shelves are adjustable so I can make one higher than the other. IIRC, they are now running about $85-90. Add a sheet of 5/8 plywood to make a 1-1/4" thick top, and you have a nice bench for under $125
     
  8. rfwobbly

    rfwobbly Member

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2008
    Messages:
    3,925
    Location:
    Cornelia, GA
    I agree. Build your own and not only save, but end up with a better bench.

    • You can buy the steel brackets and screws from Lowes or HD, then recycle lumber from scrap yards, other projects, building sites, etc. Just before Thanksgiving my HD had a sale on ten new 2x10 x20 FEET for $4 each. Good wood is everywhere.

    • Reloading benches are typically taller than the average "work bench" or desk. Build your own to your heights needs.

    • Everyone's space is different. Building you own lets you tailor your bench to your space.
     
  9. rondog

    rondog Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2007
    Messages:
    6,788
    Location:
    Commurado
    IMO, this is totally subject to the space you have to work with and your personal needs, and woodworking skills/tools. There's a thousand different ways you could go with this. But Harbor Freight also has some nice workbench kits too.

    I just used an old 6 ft. folding banquet table, built a shelf across the legs with 2x12's, and put an old bookcase cut in half on the back of the top for some shelves. But I'm kind of a Bubba about "recycling" old stuff like this. I go for cheap and functional over fancy and pretty.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. 472x1A/B

    472x1A/B Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    Messages:
    203
    Location:
    West-cent. Ill.
    Really nice bench there rondog. Way better than my scrap wood bench. (sorry for no pictures, no camra)
     
  11. UpTheIrons

    UpTheIrons Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Messages:
    388
    Location:
    South-Central Texas
    I built mine out of scavenged lumber and a discarded kitchen island top. The island top is 30x38" and I bummed all the 2x4s and 2x10s from my F-I-L. Total material cost was about $15 for the hardware. It fits nicely in the garage, plus I still have room for a single stage press on the left side, even though it will be a snug fit. After this picture was taken, I did put an angle brace on the back to increase stability. The shelf is made of 2x10s, which really helps with the weight, too.

    I kinda wish I had made it a bit bigger, though, because it is already full of cans of brass, bullet boxes, powder cans and more.

    [​IMG]
     
  12. shooter_from_show-me

    shooter_from_show-me Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2010
    Messages:
    240
    Location:
    West Central Mizzou
    Built mine by scratch with about $40 in material and a few hours on a Saturday about 18 months ago. Since then I have anchored it to the wall...:)

    [​IMG]



    Bill
     
  13. Hiwbiwwy

    Hiwbiwwy Member

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2010
    Messages:
    2
  14. Hondo 60
    • Contributing Member

    Hondo 60 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2009
    Messages:
    5,325
    Location:
    Manitowoc, WI
    Mine's just an old computer desk with a 2x6 bolted to it.
    This gives me the option to sit while I reload.

    [​IMG]
     
  15. BikerNut

    BikerNut Member

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2008
    Messages:
    115
    Location:
    Illinois
    Look at the sticky at the top of this forum called "Show Us Your Reloading Bench". There's currently 67 pages of ideas.

    What usually works best varies with each individual. I used office furniture to build my reloading bench/gun cleaning bench... because I already had it and it was easy to convert it to for what I needed.

    [​IMG]

    Office furniture can be handy because of the built-in shelves, drawers, etc. Plus, there are mountains of used office furniture for dirt cheap prices.

    There are more perfect setups than mine, but it works for me.
     
  16. kennedy

    kennedy Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
    Messages:
    832
    Location:
    southern Ind.
    I attached an old counter top to the wall, braced the front with 4x4s, used an old bathroom vanity with drawers to fit under it. all scrap I had in my shed, one note, I had to place a 2x4 vertically from the floor to under the bench where press was mounted to take up the strain of full length sizing.
     
  17. GP100man

    GP100man Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2007
    Messages:
    1,749
    Location:
    Tabor City, NC.
    I just built a 2x4 frame ,covered with 3/4 plywood , nail 2x4 in a L then screwed em in & braced em . Ya can also put a bottm shelf on the legs to store bullets or gear to add weight . Add shelves on top as needed

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  18. rsrocket1

    rsrocket1 Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2010
    Messages:
    1,276
    Location:
    Sacramento, CA
    +1 on the Gorilla Rack. I have a single layer of plywood on mine and have used it over the years as an RC airplane building bench, a ham radio repair workshop, Xbox mod center :) and now a reloading bench. I do use 2x4's and 2x6's to mount my presses similar to Hondo 60. These pieces of wood run to the back wall where bookshelf brackets anchor the wood to the wall studs. This makes the presses totally stiff and works great when full length resizing rifle cases.
     
  19. HOWARD J

    HOWARD J Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2010
    Messages:
    2,185
    Location:
    S/E Michigan
  20. Olympus

    Olympus Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2008
    Messages:
    3,564
    I've already looked through the sticky about the benches. That's what I was asking if what the pre-fab kits were. l think I'm going to look at the price difference the 2x4 Basics deal and just actually building my own.
     
  21. brandon_mcg

    brandon_mcg Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2010
    Messages:
    614
    Location:
    Macon, Ga
    checked into some of the pre-fabs before i built my work bench. i built an 8 feet long x 4 feet wide work bench for 38 bucks. for that price i'm thinking about building another one.
     
  22. Fleet

    Fleet Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2010
    Messages:
    384
    Location:
    Oklahoma
  23. jmorris

    jmorris Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2005
    Messages:
    9,323
    When we were kids my brother an I couldn’t reload inside the house while Mom was home so we mounted the presses to 4X4’s and clamped them in a bench vice in the garage when in use and at the top of our closet in a rack when not in use. It was quick, very stable and out of sight when not loading.
     
  24. sniper5

    sniper5 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2007
    Messages:
    735
    Location:
    **********
    For a benchtop you might want to look at an undrilled solid core door. They can be had for not too much money, and are pretty much ready to go as a bench top and are VERY rigid. Combine that with some 2x2 or 2x6 or 4x4 lumber and galvanized construction hardware and you should be into the project for not too much money.
     
  25. Lost Sheep

    Lost Sheep Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2009
    Messages:
    2,661
    Location:
    Alaska
    Why build? (Just another option)

    When I started reloading, everything I used fit in a footlocker and could be set up on an end table (with my powder scale sitting on the separate coffee table).

    I also recommend a dropcloth. Spread it out to catch any spilled powder, dropped primers (live or spent) and the inevitable carbon and primer residue that comes out of spent cartridges.

    Recently, I just repackaged all the stuff I regularly use and will share with you the pieces of my reloading setup and how I store/transport them.

    3 Toolboxes:

    One: (23" x 10" x 10") contains my press (Lee Classic Turret), mounting system (a 2"x6" board that I clamp into a portable workbench or anything handy) a small 4"X8"X1.5" fishing tackle box to contain all the small parts & tools and the primer feeding system. There's room for a couple of manuals in there, too, but I store them on my bookshelf, with one next to the computer.

    The second: (15"x8"x8") contains all the gunpowder handling parts. Scale, funnel, Lee Auto-Disk Powder measure/dispenser and a set of Lee's measuring scoops/dippers and my loading safety glasses.

    The third: (15"x7"x7") contains seven sets of reloading dies, mounted in their turrets inside their storage cylinders, ready to plug into the press and use.

    With my folding workbench, I can set up my reloading room anywhere in just a few minutes and take it down just as fast.

    If you really want a permanent bench sitting in your extra room, go for it. Having shelves with doors perhaps is very convenient and having things permanently set up is good, too. I have preferred portability. I can even easily take my entire setup to a friend's house for a two-man loading session or to the range. Just one man's choice I thought I would share.

    Lost Sheep
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page